Railfan.net Home Railfan Photos ABPR Archives Staff Safari Photos Railfan Links

Railfan.net Forums Railfan.net Forums Railfan.net Forums
Welcome, Guest. Please Sign In or Register. Mar 25th, 2017, 3:46am
Categories •  FastIndex •  LongIndex •  Help •  Search •  Members  •  Sign In •  Register


Trains, TV, Movies, & Other Media
   Railfan.net Web Forums
   The Mainline
   The Concourse
(Moderator: Forum Admin)
   Trains, TV, Movies, & Other Media
« Previous topic | Next topic »
Pages: 1 ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16  ReplyReply     EMail TopicEMail Topic   PrintPrint
   Author  Topic: Trains, TV, Movies, & Other Media  (Read 5717 times)
Henry
Historian
Posts: 6065
Re: Trains, TV, Movies, & Other Media
 
« Reply #180 on: May 8th, 2006, 11:44am »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

I caught the last two thirds of it purely by accident while flipping channels. I usually don't watch "Silent Sundays" on TCM, but it usually isn't about trains
 
While there was plenty of slapstick, I was impressed with how the General and Texas looked, they were decent representations of Civil War locos. Of course, in 1927 there would have still have been people alive who could remember how old mid-19th century American type locos looked. It wasn't accurate period prototype railroading, but I still enjoyed it.
 
Henry


Logged
toddsyr

View Profile  

Posts: 4322
Re: Trains, TV, Movies, & Other Media
 
« Reply #181 on: May 8th, 2006, 2:03pm »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

I hear ya Henry. I'm not a fan of silent films either, but this was a must see for me as it's been discussed here. I actually enjoyed it, of course, due to the vintage trains. The General met my expectations from what I knew of it, but the Texas was an added bonus. Any idea on the make of the coaches? They were rather unique looking! Two tiers of windows and all. As for you missing the first 1/3, you only lost out on the narrator's beginning and probably not too much of the rail action. Just how Buster Keaton is rejected from serving the Southern Forces, yet still ends up as a Union enemy. I can't remember if this was mentioned in this thread previously, but the narrator says the film was made on an Oregon shortline. The film maker wanted to do it in Georgia etc., but couldn't find any narrow gauge in that part of the country. He wanted to keep the story as authentic as possible. Thus, they found the narrow gauge line in Oregon. Todd

Logged

George_Harris
Historian
Posts: 3780
Re: Trains, TV, Movies, & Other Media
 
« Reply #182 on: May 8th, 2006, 10:02pm »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

on May 8th, 2006, 2:03pm, toddsyr wrote:       (Click here for original message)
The film maker wanted to do it in Georgia etc., but couldn't find any narrow gauge in that part of the country. He wanted to keep the story as authentic as possible. Thus, they found the narrow gauge line in Oregon. Todd

Huh?  The Western and Atlantic was a five foot gauge railroad.  Definitely not narrow gauge.  
The story I had heard, which I believe you can find stated in the 1962 article in Trains magazine about the restoration of the General and the re-enactment of the chase was that the studio had wanted to use the originals, but the NC&StL who owned it and the city of Chattanooga which thought they controlled it both refused on the grounds that treating this thing as a comedy was an insult to all involved, particulary the Southerners.  They also did not want to take any risk of the engine being damaged.  Remember, in the 1920's there were a lot of Confederate and Union veterans both still alive and active.  This feeling that it showed disrespect for a life and death struggle also had a lot to do in making the movie just about as far from the original event as it could get without leaving the US.
 
George


Logged
toddsyr

View Profile  

Posts: 4322
Re: Trains, TV, Movies, & Other Media
 
« Reply #183 on: May 9th, 2006, 11:49am »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

George, though your opinion is highly respected by me, I'm just going by what the narrator said. Yes, the equipment was lettered for Western & Atlantic but this doesn't mean it wasn't re-lettered. Just a thought. For what it's worth, the track didn't look like narrow gauge to me, but there was no other track to compare it to. As discussed before in this thread, I don't believe the original General was used either. Todd

Logged

HwyHaulier
Historian
Posts: 3424
Re: Trains, TV, Movies, & Other Media
 
« Reply #184 on: May 9th, 2006, 12:04pm »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

George -
 
Besides, the Southerners were touchy for the longest time. I recall the early 1960s, when news didn't travel quite as fast. Many of my Southerner acquaintances claimed they had no knowledge of spurious reports the War Of Northern Aggression had ended! <G>
 
....................Vern................Bel Air, MD.................


Logged

Ticket Agent serving...Pacific Stage Lines...Washington State System...Mt. Hood Stages...Pickwick Stages...Transcontinental & Western Air Lines.... Admitted Gold Bug..... Observant Orthodox Mossback..... H.M.R.A.O. Curmudgeons......
toddsyr

View Profile  

Posts: 4322
Re: Trains, TV, Movies, & Other Media
 
« Reply #185 on: May 9th, 2006, 7:18pm »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

From what I understand, there's still "pockets of resistance". As for George's comments, I have to side with his opinion seeing how Hollywood got another part of the authenticity wrong. The Texas pursued in reverse, unlike in the movie. Don't get me wrong, I liked the film, but here's some more accurate details.
 
From:  
 
http://www.andrewsraid.com/
 
"The Beginnings & Pursuing The General
The locomotive Texas, like the General, was built in, Paterson, New Jersey, but not by the same builder. The Texas was built by Danforth, Cooke & Company and placed in service on the Western & Atlantic Railroad in October, 1856. The original cost of the Texas was $9,050. At the time, the gauge of the Western & Atlantic RR was five feet, and the Texas was built to that gauge. The drivers were 60 inches in diameter, and there were four, together with four leading truck wheels, making the locomotive of the well known American type with a 4-4-0 wheel arrangement. Her cylinders were fifteen inches in diameter, and the stroke was 22 inches. The Texas was of the same power and approximately the same size as the General. The engine was shipped from New Jersey by water to Savannah and there put on the rails of the Central Railway of Georgia to Macon and thence over the rails of the Macon & Western RR to Atlanta. One of the first modifications made to the engine in the shops of the Western & Atlantic RR was to replace the pilot or cow catcher with one of horizontal pieces of strap iron. This type of cow catcher was a mark of engines of the Western & Atlantic RR in those days, and all pilots were of this type. The man who made them was Richard A. "Uncle Dick" Saye, who died in 1910.
 
During the Civil War period, it was customary to assign a locomotive to assign a locomotive to an engineer and to a special run. In April, 1862, the Texas was assigned to Peter James Bracken, engineer, and his fireman was Henry P. Haney. Braken was a man of 28 years while Haney was a mere lad of fifteen years. They were assigned to a regular freight run between Dalton and Atlanta. At Dalton, the Western & Atlantic RR was connected with the East Tennessee & Georgia Railroad which served east Tennessee and had connections to the north and east. On April 11, 1862, the Texas ran north leaving Atlanta about 10:00 AM, and arriving in Dalton around 6:00 PM. On the morning of April 12, 1862, Bracken left Dalton with the Texas and 21 loaded cars bound for Atlanta. About two miles south of Adairsville, he was flagged by Conductor William A. Fuller and Anthony Murphy, foreman of the Machinery and Motive Power at the State Road Shops in Atlanta. These two were afoot at this point seeking to overcome their train pulled by the General, which had been stolen that morning by the Union raiding party led by James J. Andrews, spy and contraband merchant. Bracken knew both Fuller and Murphy, and he stopped his train and took them aboard. They proceeded to tell Bracken what had happened, and Bracken backed his train to Adairsville. Just a few minutes before, the General, with its three cars, had passed him at Adairsville, and he was curious then about the train speeding through with no one aboard who was familiar to him. They reached Adairsville within a few minutes, and the 21 cars were set aside on the fly. Then The Great Locomotive Chase was on more even terms, even though the Texas was running in reverse.
 
The pursuit of the General by the Texas continued northward for some 51 miles before the General was abandoned by the Andrews Raiders about two miles north of Ringgold. Certainly the Texas was the hero of this run, but through the years, the General has received most of the credit and notoriety. Captain Fuller was inclined towards the Texas, as he stated in an interview in 1895, "The question as to whether the General or the Texas should have the honors has been discussed. I am rather inclined to the Texas, but at the same time I never could have availed myself of the service of the Texas if I had not succeeded in getting the William R. Smith at Kingston; nor could I have got to the Smith if the Yonah had been out of reach at Etowah. And if I had not had the use of the old handcar from Moon's Station to Etowah, I never could have reached the Yonah in time. So all of these came in for a share." Along with the Texas should be honored those men who were running her. At the top of the list is Peter James Bracken, the engineer; Henry P Haney, the fireman; Alonzo Martin, wood passer; and Fleming Cox, brakeman, together with Conductor William A. Fuller, and foreman Anthony Murphy.
 
As the chase ended and the raiders abandoned the General and fled into the woods, each man for himself, Braken eased the Texas to within a few feet of the General. He then directed young Haney to go aboard and see if anything was wrong. Haney found the firebox door open and very little fire in the firebox. He then tried the water cocks and found little or no water in the boiler. After a wait of 20 or 30 minutes, the Texas took the General in tow and mover her back to Ringgold. Here the General was left, and Bracken and Haney with the Texas went on down to Adairsville where they picked up their freight cars and proceeded to Atlanta, just as though nothing had happened.
 
In October, 1895, Peter J. Bracken summed up his experience in running the Texas on April 12, 1862 in a letter to William A. Fuller as follows: "I was running the Texas on the day that Andrews stole the General. If I had not been running myself, I would not have rode on her with anyone else running, as I would not (have) taken the chances or run the risk we run that day with any one else handling the engine. It makes me nervous now when I think of the X-ties on the track. I do not want any unnecessary notoriety about the chase and would not answer or pay any attention to those questions from any one else but on account of old times and old friendship, I will answer them to the best of my recollection and ability. My recollections are that no one else touched the throttle of my engine from the time I saw you coming down the hill east of Adairsville until we run up on the General about three miles above Ringgold."


« Last Edit: May 9th, 2006, 7:20pm by toddsyr » Logged

toddsyr

View Profile  

Posts: 4322
Re: Trains, TV, Movies, & Other Media
 
« Reply #186 on: May 15th, 2006, 10:04pm »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

Starting NOW, at 10 eastern, The Harvey Girls. As in Fred Harvey. No future airdates listed. It's on the TCM channel. Todd

« Last Edit: May 15th, 2006, 10:07pm by toddsyr » Logged

toddsyr

View Profile  

Posts: 4322
Re: Trains, TV, Movies, & Other Media
 
« Reply #187 on: May 17th, 2006, 6:43pm »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

Coming on in about 17 minutes, Mega Machines on the Discovery Channel. One segment will feature the GE Evolution locomotive. Todd

Logged

notrom
TRAINing
Posts: 15
Re: Trains, TV, Movies, & Other Media
 
« Reply #188 on: May 19th, 2006, 8:07am »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

Nobody's mentioned a British film The Titfield Thunderbolt. Shot in the late 1950s, the Ealing Films production features a sleepy rural branch line set for closure by British Railways (the then nationalised owner of all mainline railways in GB). A gentle comedy of how local villagers decide to run their own railway, it turns on a battle between the villagers and the evil owners of a bus company who do everything they can to sabotage the railway, hoping to get it closed so they will have a monopoly on local transportation. Great shots of a single line railway in rural south west England (I think it was shot in Devon) and their sole locomotive, an ex-Great Western Railway 0-4-2 steam tank engine and a handful of coaches, one of which which includes a bar (you couldn't make a film today in which alcohol and drinking feature so heavily!).
 
When the owners of the bus company sabotage the locomotive and cause it to crash, in desperation the villagers remove a preserved locomotive (a genuine Bury 0-4-0 dating, I would guess, from 1835-1840) from the local museum and steam it up as a replacement. thouroughly enjoyable film with lots of steam footage. For me, the highlights are all too brief shots of the mainline station where the branch line meets the mian London lines and you get to see tantalisingly brief  sequences of ex-Great Western 4-6-0 express locomotives, including, I think, one of the last surviving GW Churchward-designed Star class (built 1914, last survivor scrapped 1957) and its successor, the Castle Class. For those of you unfamiliar with these locomotives, they were painted in a beautiful dark green livery, with copper capped chimneys and a polished brass fitting that enclosed the boiler top feed mechanism and the safety valves. the locomotives had outside cylinders but inside Walshaert's valve gear and are some of the most handsome British locomotives built - glorious engines indeed!
 
Apart from that, I would agree that The Train with Burt Lancaster has to be the best film featuring steam ever made.


Logged
toddsyr

View Profile  

Posts: 4322
Re: Trains, TV, Movies, & Other Media
 
« Reply #189 on: May 20th, 2006, 4:25pm »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

Thanks for the post notrom and welcome to the forums! I'll surely keep an eye out for "The Titfield Thunderbolt". It sounds very entertaining. If you see an airtime for it, feel free to post it here. Todd
 


Logged

DLWJohn
Railfan
Posts: 184
Re: Trains, TV, Movies, & Other Media
 
« Reply #190 on: May 20th, 2006, 4:49pm »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

I think it was on a three stooges board where we were discussing The General, The locomotives were from some logging road, whose name I cant recall, from northern California I believe(?) The thread on the board about it is probably long gone but I'll see if I can find it again.

Logged
toddsyr

View Profile  

Posts: 4322
Re: Trains, TV, Movies, & Other Media
 
« Reply #191 on: May 20th, 2006, 9:12pm »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

Thanks PC. Good luck and looking forward to new data. Todd

Logged

toddsyr

View Profile  

Posts: 4322
Re: Trains, TV, Movies, & Other Media
  MATEWAN_COAL_TIPPLE.jpg - 52615 Bytes
« Reply #192 on: May 27th, 2006, 12:55pm »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

I saw a movie last night called Matewan on the IFC. Yahoo listings description:
 
"Matewan (1987)
IFC May 27 10:30am Add to My Calendar
Movies, 135 Mins.
***+ (Rated PG-13)  
 
  You can record this program to your TiVo. Learn more...
 
A union organizer's work with coal miners ends in a massacre in 1920s Matewan, W.Va.  
 
Cast: Chris Cooper, Will Oldham, James Earl Jones, Mary McDonnell, Bob Gunton, Kevin Tighe, Gordon Clapp, Josh Mostel, Joe Grifasi, Maggie Renzi, David Strathairn.
Director(s): John Sayles
 
When I saw the movie involved coal mining, I figured trains must be involved. This they were, but not in the capacity  I figured on. I was hoping for alot of switching, branch runs etc, but there was none. However, trains made several appearances. This included a steam hauled passenger train at various times, some vintage wooden box cars, station areas, and even a mining tram. I wasn't disappointed in the least. Also, the miners early plights and attempts at unionizing were portrayed very well. In real life, Matewan W. Virginia was served by the Norfolk & Western. Here's a photo of the Matewan coal tipple from:
 
http://community-2.webtv.net/DizHarris/SHINBRIERALMOST/page4.html
 


http://Forums.Railfan.net/Images/concourse/MATEWAN_COAL_TIPPLE.jpg
Click Image to Resize

« Last Edit: May 27th, 2006, 12:56pm by toddsyr » Logged

toddsyr

View Profile  

Posts: 4322
Re: Trains, TV, Movies, & Other Media
 
« Reply #193 on: May 27th, 2006, 4:20pm »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

I had to run a virus scan just now due to some crap that tried to infect my PC while doing a search. Nod32 saved my butt once again! Anyhow, while that was running, I scanned the TV listings and noticed the PBS show Tracks Ahead has returned to the air. It's coming on in 10 minutes ( 4:30 Eastern ) on PBS. Todd

Logged

PW_bullet_train
Former Member
Re: Trains, TV, Movies, & Other Media
 
« Reply #194 on: May 28th, 2006, 2:21pm »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify   Remove

I just saw "Von Ryan's Express" yesterday.  Nice scenes of the Italian State Railways, particularly in the mountains.

Logged
toddsyr

View Profile  

Posts: 4322
Re: Trains, TV, Movies, & Other Media
  VON_RYANS_EXPRESS.jpg - 5683 Bytes
« Reply #195 on: May 28th, 2006, 11:48pm »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

I remember the movie fairly well, but am probably due to see it again. That's the one good thing about bad memory, old movies become "new" again after a few short years! Thanks for the post PW_bullet_train. Here's a picture of some equipment I found on:
 
http://www.tmc.tv/les_films/story_80373.shtml
 
I think it's a French website, definitely not English. Todd


http://Forums.Railfan.net/Images/concourse/VON_RYANS_EXPRESS.jpg
Click Image to Resize

Logged

HwyHaulier
Historian
Posts: 3424
Re: Trains, TV, Movies, & Other Media
 
« Reply #196 on: May 29th, 2006, 9:29am »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

In the past week or so, Fugitive Lovers (1934) ran. From my viewing, came off as a fair adventure story, starring a 1933 Greyhound Lines "Z" type Yellow Coach.  
 
In the online movie data base (IMDB), it gets high marks for good camera work. Just about any kind of scene any one would want. Toward the end of the film, several scenes with a Santa Fe freight, under steam of course.
 
As the bus is enroute New York to St. Louis, the technical folks did a good job. Recall the Penna. Turnpike wasn't open yet; thus, no food and rest stop at Breezewood. The stop for lunch at what is said to be Altoona. Scene includes a city streetcar in the background.
 
In the era, Greyhound clearly had good relationships with the movie studios. In this film, coach #3166 was logically either Pacific (SP) or Overland (UP). Greyhound was careful, though, not to highlight the identity of a paticular member carrier.....
 
.....................Vern....................Bel Air, MD..................  


Logged

Ticket Agent serving...Pacific Stage Lines...Washington State System...Mt. Hood Stages...Pickwick Stages...Transcontinental & Western Air Lines.... Admitted Gold Bug..... Observant Orthodox Mossback..... H.M.R.A.O. Curmudgeons......
toddsyr

View Profile  

Posts: 4322
Re: Trains, TV, Movies, & Other Media
 
« Reply #197 on: May 29th, 2006, 9:50pm »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

Sounds like a great flick Vern! I'll have to keep an eye out for it for sure. Any idea what network it aired on? Thanks for the post, Todd.

Logged

RDG_4-8-4
Former Member
Re: Trains, TV, Movies, & Other Media
 
« Reply #198 on: Jul 9th, 2006, 11:45pm »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify   Remove

The opening sequences of "Those Bedroom Eyes" shows a lot of high-speed Amtrak action featuring SDP-40F's, F-40's, and finally a CofG E unit.  Those SDP's were really moving!!

Logged
toddsyr

View Profile  

Posts: 4322
Re: Trains, TV, Movies, & Other Media
 
« Reply #199 on: Jul 10th, 2006, 1:52am »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

Thanks for the post RDG. I don't recall this movie so I looked it up at:
 
http://movies2.nytimes.com/gst/movies/movie.html?v_id=147231
 
Definitely not for the younger railfans! Here's the description the NY Times gives:
 
"Those Bedroom Eyes
1992-Erotic Thriller
 
PLOT DESCRIPTION
 
William (Tim Matheson) is a Harvard psychology professor who is having a hard time dealing with life after the death of his wife when he meets a beautiful woman named Ali (Mimi Rogers). William and Ali strike up a relationship, and he finds the days easier to face. However, she seems oddly secretive about her past, and William can't help but wonder if she's hiding something. When William discovers the police are investigating Ali in connection with a series of murders, he becomes determined to find out her secret so he can clear her name. ~ Mark Deming, All Movie Guide"
 
It's great to hear there's alot of railroad action in the movie, I'll watch it if for that only. I do appreciate the post RDG, one more "railroad film" to watch out for! Todd


Logged

Pages: 1 ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16  ReplyReply     EMail TopicEMail Topic   PrintPrint

« Previous topic | Next topic »