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Railroads? Miles or Kilometers?
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   Author  Topic: Railroads? Miles or Kilometers?  (Read 479 times)
George_Harris
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Posts: 3833
Re: Railroads? Miles or Kilometers?
 
« Reply #20 on: Nov 19th, 2007, 2:43am »
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on Nov 16th, 2007, 11:03pm, ClydeDET wrote:       (Click here for original message)
"Low benefit" George? I'm more inclined to say "No benefit, and cost a lot besides".

I agree.
 
KenV says:
Quote:
Maybe they now teach such things much earlier and perhaps even give a direct conversion between cubic metres and litres (which is 1,000 litres per m3)  
 
The point is that there is some relationship between many of the various metric units that doesn't exist with the Imperial system. Can you imagine trying to figure out the number of gallons to fill a pool 20x10x6 feet in your head?  
P.S. 1 cubic foot = 7.480 519 481 gallon [US, liquid]

Really quite simple:
First if you have any need to deal with this sort of stuff, 1000 liters per cubic meter is automatic.  There is no wet/dry issue at all. A liter is a measure of volume, pure and simple.  
 
Same for doing the swimming pool in good wonderful English units.  First, you do it in cubic feet.  20x10x6 = 1200 cubic feet.  Hydraulic calculations dealing with large volumes and drainage calculations and such are always done in cubic feet, flow rates in feet per second and volume rates in cubic feet per second.  If you want gallons you either multiply by 7.5 on the end or 7.48 if you want to be fancy about it.  When dealing with water flows and volumes generally if you are within 10% you are good enough in drainage calculations.  Any analysis beyond three significant figures (+/-1% precision) you are only fooling yourself.  A one inch difference in depth makes for a 17 cubic foot change in volume, which is over 1%.  Yes, I know the exact calculation for one inch depth is 16.666666666 ad infinitum cubic feet, but anything beyond 16.7 is not really significant.  That is 125 gallons, by the way.  Close enough.  
 
Yes, I know that the common unit in water supply is gpm = gallons per minute, but that has more to do with water being billed to the consumer by the gallon than anything else.


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Les_Shepherd
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Posts: 425
Re: Railroads? Miles or Kilometers?
 
« Reply #21 on: Jan 12th, 2008, 7:35am »
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We made the switch to metrics in the mid 1970's.
 
All of the railroads reposted their lines with KM posts. The speed boards were all changed to kph. Metric tonnes was easy and relpacing imperial gallons with litres was no problem. I don.t think that anyhone wants to  go back to imperial.
 
Changing temperatures to celsius also proved to be no problem.
 
About the only area where difficulty has been encountered is in short lineal lengths. Quoting personal height in centermetres is still not widely understood. General references to lengths of less than 1 metre (3 ft approx) also often causes short term difficulty particularly for those of us who grew up in the imperial era.
 
The suggestion about common currencies is fraught. They are trying it in Europe. From this distance it seems unlikely that US/CAN would every have a single currency, however logical the suggestion. The same goes here. It is periodically suggested that Australia & New Zealand adopt a common currency. I doubt that it will ever happen.
 
The comments about exchange rates are apt. The exchange rates for Canadian, South African, Australian, & New Zealand currences can and do move by substantial amounts over a short period. This is driven by currency traders moving huge quantities of dollars between currencies to obtain better interest rates. One of the biggest groups of operaters in this market are Japanese housewives.


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rwk
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Posts: 708
Re: Railroads? Miles or Kilometers?
 
« Reply #22 on: Jan 12th, 2008, 11:17am »
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About Celsius, did you know that -40 is the same in both F and C, and that 32F is freezing, but 32C is hot, equivalent to about 85F. So, if an American goes to Canada in July and looks at the temp., and sees it's 32, it will seem weird at first because 32 to Americans is the freezing mark, when snow and ice is possible.

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Pennsy
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Re: Railroads? Miles or Kilometers?
 
« Reply #23 on: Jan 12th, 2008, 2:19pm »
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Couple of points:
 
23 to 25 degrees Centigrade (Celsius) is room temperature.
 
Money: Ridiculous as it may sound, the Euro is worth more than the American Dollar. Incredible as that may sound, you can thank Good Old George Dubya for that one. And so Europeans are flocking to the US to spend their Euros at a great advantage, as we used to do in Europe.  
 
Another point, Europeans and Canadians have a problem with our currency, it is all GREEN. In Canada, and Europe, paper money changes color as the valure increases. By contrast ALL American money is..... GREEN.
Problems arise from that problem. If I remember correctly, the Canadian dollar is Green, the Two Dollar bill is reddish, and the Five dollar bill is blue. As I also remember it, in Europe, the size of the bill changes as the value increases. Difficult to carry in a wallet. Hopefully Euros solved that problem.
 
The part that always surprised me, as you spend that "Monopoly Money" you really ARE spending your money. I actually solved the problem by using credit cards as much as possible. The credit card company will convert to dollars at the rate at the time you spent the money. Quite a savings with time.  


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Les_Shepherd
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Posts: 425
Re: Railroads? Miles or Kilometers?
 
« Reply #24 on: Jan 13th, 2008, 7:56am »
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I like your points about the colour/shape of money Pennsy. I am always careful with US currency for the reasons you state.  
 
We have taken the different colour/shape of banknotes a step further in that they are not printed on paper but on a patented polymer. In short, a sort of plastic. It definately makes couterfeiting almost impossible.
 
In relation to credit cards, I avoid using them for foreign currency transactions wherever possible. This is because the card companies not only charge the usual spread on the exchange rates but also a commission of about 2% on top. It is better to buy cash at a Bank. Sure, let the hotel take s swipe of the credit card but when paying on departure give them cash. On a long trip those commissions can add up.


« Last Edit: Jan 13th, 2008, 8:00am by Les_Shepherd » Logged

Pennsy
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Re: Railroads? Miles or Kilometers?
 
« Reply #25 on: Jan 13th, 2008, 10:49am »
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Hi Les,
 
I might add one other interesting piece of trivia; In Pennsylvania, there is the American Bank Note Company. You guessed it, they print lots of foreign currencies. Most notable, Mexican and Canadian. If you have some look at it carefully and you will see it is printed in the good old USA.


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Pyronova

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Re: Railroads? Miles or Kilometers?
 
« Reply #26 on: Jan 14th, 2008, 3:37am »
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on Jan 12th, 2008, 2:19pm, Pennsy wrote:       (Click here for original message)

Money: Ridiculous as it may sound, the Euro is worth more than the American Dollar. Incredible as that may sound, you can thank Good Old George Dubya for that one. And so Europeans are flocking to the US to spend their Euros at a great advantage, as we used to do in Europe.  
 
Another point, Europeans and Canadians have a problem with our currency, it is all GREEN. In Canada, and Europe, paper money changes color as the valure increases. By contrast ALL American money is..... GREEN.
Problems arise from that problem. If I remember correctly, the Canadian dollar is Green, the Two Dollar bill is reddish, and the Five dollar bill is blue. As I also remember it, in Europe, the size of the bill changes as the value increases. Difficult to carry in a wallet. Hopefully Euros solved that problem.

 
Have a look at the new "Green" USA money....  It is now coloured.  The $50 is red, the $20 is green etc.....
 
The Canadian dollar is brass, as it is a coin and has been since 1989. Nicknamed the "loonie" as it has the bird "Loon" on the one side.
The Canadian $2 is also a coin.  Two colours as it is a brass centre and a silver outer ring. Makes sense: 2 colours and 2 metals.  Called a "Twonie" as a slang carried forward from the "loonie".  Doubloon never made it.  The "Twonie" has a bear on one side.  So it is the only coin in the British Commonwealth that has the Queen with a bear behind.  
The smallest Canadian note is the Five dollar bill, which is blue with a Hologram stripe on one side.  $10 - Purple also the hologram; same with the green $20.  Haven't seen a new red $50 or a new brown $100 with the new hologram stripe.   The pink $1000 are no longer.
I like the Australian notes:  Made of 6 or 8 layers of plastic.  Can only be destroyed by cutting: it won't rip!  Great if left in the washing machine!  


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Les_Shepherd
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Posts: 425
Re: Railroads? Miles or Kilometers?
 
« Reply #27 on: Jan 23rd, 2008, 5:33am »
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on Jan 13th, 2008, 10:49am, Pennsy wrote:       (Click here for original message)
I might add one other interesting piece of trivia; In Pennsylvania, there is the American Bank Note Company. You guessed it, they print lots of foreign currencies. Most notable, Mexican and Canadian. If you have some look at it carefully and you will see it is printed in the good old USA.

 
Printing and coining is an international business. Those who do it amount to somethiing of a closed club. There are a number of countries who print and coin for their neighbours and others. In Australia we print and coin for most of the Pacific Islands countries.
 
Prior to the 1950's when there was an overflow of orders we had coins minted at Denver and San Francisco. The coins carried the mintmarks from those mints.


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