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BTC Baltimore Traction Co.
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   Author  Topic: BTC Baltimore Traction Co.  (Read 239 times)
Barronm11
Railfan
Posts: 119
BTC Baltimore Traction Co.
 
« on: Jun 17th, 2008, 12:05pm »
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Write anything you know aout this system.

« Last Edit: Jun 17th, 2008, 12:11pm by Barronm11 » Logged

STEAM IS MY BLOOD,I LIVE AND BREATHE IT.
(There's a reason it's called mountain thunder.)
Inlet-Longport
Railfan
Posts: 116
Re: BTC Baltimore Traction Co.
 
« Reply #1 on: Jun 26th, 2008, 4:12pm »
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Baltimore Traction Co. was one of the independent street railway operators in Baltimore, MD during the late 19th Century.  It was formed in 1889 from the amalgamation of the Citizens Railway Co. and the People's Railway Co.    Starting in 1890, Baltimore Traction converted several horsecar lines to cable car operation which proved to be a costly mistake as the introduction of electric streetcars made the cable lines obsolete.  By 1893, the company began to convert its lines to electric operation.
 
In 1897, Baltimore Traction and the City & Surburban Railway were merged into Baltimore Consolidated Railway Co.  In 1898, all of the independent operators were brought together to form the United Railways & Electric Company.
 
Source:  "Who Made All Our Streetcars Go?" by Michael R. Farrell, published
in 1973 by Baltimore NRHS Publications.  
 
One Baltimore Traction car is still extant and operable.  Car 554 a single truck Brownell open car is in the collection of the Baltimore Streetcar Museum and is painted in Baltimore Traction colors.


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Barronm11
Railfan
Posts: 119
Re: BTC Baltimore Traction Co.
  img_1050.jpg - 177893 Bytes
« Reply #2 on: Jul 2nd, 2008, 10:21am »
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I think it would be a nice change to bring streetcars back to the city.


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STEAM IS MY BLOOD,I LIVE AND BREATHE IT.
(There's a reason it's called mountain thunder.)
HwyHaulier
Historian
Posts: 3433
Re: BTC Baltimore Traction Co.
 
« Reply #3 on: Jul 2nd, 2008, 3:18pm »
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on Jul 2nd, 2008, 10:21am, Barronm11 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
I think it would be a nice change to bring streetcars back to the city.

Well, of course it would! The long and dedicated work in San Francisco is quite the towering triumph of what can be done with thoughtful  
applications of Heritage Cars. Evidently, the riding public (heavy on tourists in the mix in that city) can't get enough of it...
 
San Francisco, of course, is not everywhere else. IMHO, there are some US cities, though, that would be well served to implement  
All Heritage Cars! All The Time! core systems...
 
....................Vern..................


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Ticket Agent serving...Pacific Stage Lines...Washington State System...Mt. Hood Stages...Pickwick Stages...Transcontinental & Western Air Lines.... Admitted Gold Bug..... Observant Orthodox Mossback..... H.M.R.A.O. Curmudgeons......
George_Harris
Historian
Posts: 3803
Re: BTC Baltimore Traction Co.
 
« Reply #4 on: Jul 2nd, 2008, 3:43pm »
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From Barroom11:  "Ithink it would be a nice change to bring streetcars back to the city."
on Jul 2nd, 2008, 3:18pm, HwyHaulier wrote:       (Click here for original message)

Well, of course it would! The long and dedicated work in San Francisco is quite the towering triumph of what can be done with thoughtful  
applications of Heritage Cars. Evidently, the riding public (heavy on tourists in the mix in that city) can't get enough of it...
 
San Francisco, of course, is not everywhere else. IMHO, there are some US cities, though, that would be well served to implement  
All Heritage Cars! All The Time! core systems...
 
....................Vern..................

One major advantage San Francisco has is the lack of need for airconditioning to keep people happy in the summertime.  Most apartments and houses in the city itself don't even have AC.  Yesterday's high (July 1!) was 62F.  Their definition of heat wave is any day with a high over 80F.  It is also hard to tell the difference between winter and summer as it also seldom gets very cold in winter, either.  Someone told me that Mark Twain once said that one of coldest winters he ever experienced was a July in San Francisco.  Therefore these relics can run with neither heat nor airconditioning and still fill up with people.  Very few cities can manage that.  San Francisco also has a very comprehensive city wide service of high frequency electric trolley and diesel busses.
 
If you were to decide to resurrect "heritage" trolley cars in places like Houston, where would you hide the AC equipment.  New Orleans with an equivalent climate gets away with what they do becuase of tourism.


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HwyHaulier
Historian
Posts: 3433
Re: BTC Baltimore Traction Co.
 
« Reply #5 on: Jul 2nd, 2008, 5:00pm »
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George -
 
on Jul 2nd, 2008, 3:43pm, George_Harris wrote:       (Click here for original message)
...It is also hard to tell the difference between winter and summer as it also seldom gets very cold in winter, either.  Someone told me that Mark Twain once said that one of coldest winters he ever experienced was a July in San Francisco...  

Been there! Done that! Your writer recalls that late July evenings, out around the Union Ave. watering holes could be quite bracing!   
 
Quote:
...If you were to decide to resurrect "heritage" trolley cars in places like Houston, where would you hide the AC equipment...  

Ummmm... Let's just say it, "builds character" to run sans A/C! <G> I can't say I've been much impressed with resulting aesthetics of older  
equipment which have received latter day retrofits. J. G. Brill designers must have had something on their minds with the high, free opening  
sash on its semi convertible products of a century back! <G>
 
And, as an aside, it wasn't bad on the 1926 Cars, Beth Steel product, used on the Espee commute schedules! Better to hear the mighty  
Fairbanks-Morse O/P Diesels going thru the paces! Man, that was some strong power!
 
..........................Vern...................
 
 


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Ticket Agent serving...Pacific Stage Lines...Washington State System...Mt. Hood Stages...Pickwick Stages...Transcontinental & Western Air Lines.... Admitted Gold Bug..... Observant Orthodox Mossback..... H.M.R.A.O. Curmudgeons......
Walt_C
Historian
Posts: 2934
Re: BTC Baltimore Traction Co.
 
« Reply #6 on: Jul 9th, 2008, 10:07pm »
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on Jul 2nd, 2008, 3:43pm, George_Harris wrote:       (Click here for original message)
 
If you were to decide to resurrect "heritage" trolley cars in places like Houston, where would you hide the AC equipment.  New Orleans with an equivalent climate gets away with what they do becuase of tourism.

 
  For the answer to that question, take a look at Philadelphia's "PCC II" cars currently operating on SEPTA's Route 15. In actuality, these cars are not particularly attractive, with the added cowl on the roof ( which contains the A/C) but they are an example of how A/C can be added to a PCC Car. One note- the PCC II's and the bulk of the PCC's running in S.F. come from the same series of cars--- the 1947 All Electric PCC's built for Philadelphia.


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Please move to the rear and speed your ride-Regards, Walt
Pennsy
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Posts: 4586
Re: BTC Baltimore Traction Co.
 
« Reply #7 on: Jul 10th, 2008, 8:09pm »
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The metropolitan Los Angeles area is quickly becoming an Easy Access via LRV, Light Rail Vehicle town. It once was using the standard trolley cars, and streetcars. And it got rid of them. Took a while, but they wised up and are now rebuilding the networks, and extending ones that have already been built. Took a while, but they finally realized the error in what they got rid of.

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Dyed in the wool PRR fan.
Walt_C
Historian
Posts: 2934
Re: BTC Baltimore Traction Co.
 
« Reply #8 on: Jul 10th, 2008, 9:53pm »
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Philadelphia was more fortunate in that regard. Its "Light Rail" lines are simply the remnants of its old streetcar system ( the five West Philadelphia Subway-Surface Lines and the restored Route 15) and the suburban-interurban lines of the old Red Arrow Lines. These lines simply replaced their museum-quality vehicles with new ( in 1981)  Kawasaki LRV's. ( Of course Route 15 employs the completely rebuilt PCC II Cars mentioned in my earlier post) Baltimore is in much the same position as L.A. in that it ran its last streetcar in 1963, and then had no rail transit until the opening of the Central Light Rail Line in the 1990's. ( I am not counting the Metro Subway Line as it is Rapid Transit like the DC Metro or the New York Subway System). Baltimore has an intersting Baltimore Rail Plan, which can be found by simply doing a search on the Baltimore Rail Plan. If this plan is even implimented, it would banket the Baltimore area with Light Rail Lines. The only problem here ( besides seeing if these lines are ever built) is the projected completion date is 40 years out-----maybe in the lifetime of some of our younger members, but probably not for many of us who are "long in the tooth".

« Last Edit: Jul 10th, 2008, 9:54pm by Walt_C » Logged

Please move to the rear and speed your ride-Regards, Walt
Inlet-Longport
Railfan
Posts: 116
Re: BTC Baltimore Traction Co.
 
« Reply #9 on: Jul 24th, 2008, 5:57pm »
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Car 1050 which is shown in a photo posting was not owned by Baltimore Traction but was purchased in 1898 as part of a 73 car order placed with Brownell by its successor, the Baltimore Consolidated Railway Co.  The 20' 9" single truck car is similar to the 20 cars ordered from the same builder in 1897 by Baltimore Traction.    
 
BCRY had to order more cars in 1898 to replace cars lost in a car barn fire in early 1898.
 
Source:  Early Electric Cars of Baltimore by Harold E. Cox, 1979, Forty Fort, PA, privately published.
 
 


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