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Books on Stations
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   Author  Topic: Books on Stations  (Read 403 times)
toptrain
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Books on Stations
 
« on: Dec 29th, 2015, 8:55am »
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A place for your book reviews of books related to Stations.
You must realize that for me a report reflects a purpose for reading a book.
A report by someone who's search for info on a station in 1956 and a opinion on a book used in that search will differ from one of a person looking for info on a 1850 station. Everyone wants to find what they are looking for. My reports are slanted towards info sought after. It seems now I read a book to find something. I am not the best person to be writing a book report.  
frank
 
 I'll start with a newer 2002 publication of a book Named - - - -;
 " TRAIN DEPOTS and ROUNDHOUSES ".
by; Hans und' April Halberstadt.
 
 A book mainly on surviving stations. The cover has a beautiful, clear view of the 1876 built Jackson, Michigan Depot. A restored, still active station. Also on page 9 is the photo again and info paragraphs on this station. A mixture of old and new views fill this 192 page book The majority are new photos in color. the further you go back into the book the scarcer the historic photo become. Still many eye popping photos in color of good definition are here to view.
 
book index
book 1 Trains Depots and Roundhouses by Hans und April Halberstadt.
book 2 Replys  1, 6, 7 " Passenger Terminals and Trains ", by John A. Droege.  
book 3 Reply  2 " Great American Railroad Stations ". By Janet Greenstein Potter.
book 4 Reply  3 " The Railroad Station " " A Architectural History " by Carol L. V. Meeks
book 5 Reply  4 " Down at the Depot " by Edwin P. Alexander.
book 6 Reply  5 " Buildings and Structures of American railroads." By Walter Gilman Berg
book 7 Reply  8 " Railway Stations, Masterpieces of Architecture " by Charles Sheppard.
book 8 Reply  9, 10 "On the Main Line" by Edwin P. Alexander.  
book 9 Reply 11 " Railway Architecture", By Marcus Binney & David Pearce.
book 10 Reply 12 " The Railway Station" by Richards and Mackenzie.
book 11 Reply 27-28, Traveling the PRR, by William Rau.
book 12 Reply 29 to 32, The Vanishing Depot, Ranulph Bye.
book 13 Reply 33-34, Readings Victorian Stations, by Edward Lewis.
book 14 Reply 36, The Next Station Will Be.  
book 15 Reply 40, Jersey City Post Card book. Randal Gabrielan.
book 16 Reply 41, CRR of NJ Stations, structures, and Marine Equipment. By Benjamin L. Bernheart
book 17 Reply 44, All Stations , Thames and Hudson.


« Last Edit: Oct 13th, 2016, 7:16am by toptrain » Logged

toptrain
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Re:  Books on Stations
 
« Reply #1 on: Dec 29th, 2015, 9:10am »
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for the second one I cover, I go a classic. it is a 1968 printing of the 1916 book  
** " Passenger Terminals and Trains ", by John A. Droege.
 Original printed not as a historic reference but as at the time a up to date informational book covering Terminals and Stations of their day. If you wish to look back to 1916 here it is, in small black and white photos mostly not sharp in definition. Information is within, and so are drawings. Early information is not here.
Enjoy !
frank.


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toptrain
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Re:  Books on Stations
 
« Reply #2 on: Dec 29th, 2015, 9:42am »
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My third book covered is a good one, matching the scope of what is done here with the long list of stations, painfully, not indexed, but even more diverse than this list. This books index is well thought out and if searched, easy to see if the Station of interest is covered here.  
 The book is;
*  " Great American Railroad Stations ". The name is simple but correct.  
* By Janet Greenstein Potter. copyright 1996.  
* You will find history, and basic architectural information on each station covered, and there are many, from all over our country. You won't find dimensional drawings, but will find, some drawings in as built views. You will fine some very interesting old views of some of the stations.
* Someday someone, or some historic Society may publish a huge 25 book cyclopedia covering everything on every station. Without a time machine a impossibility.  But a wish. Till then with my limited knowledge of aviable books  this may be the best done yet.  
Really Enjoy!
 frank


« Last Edit: Dec 29th, 2015, 10:15am by toptrain » Logged

toptrain
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Re:  Books on Stations
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« Reply #3 on: Dec 29th, 2015, 11:41am »
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* Now on to Meeks. Carol L. V. Meeks is the author of the fourth book I will cover. The title here reflects the purpose of this book.
** " The Railroad Station " " A Architectural History ". A Good book !!
** Ok now this book is by a Architect. The Author tries to cover a period from the beginning of railroading to 1956. A very large time period. He covers everywhere of consequence in his way of thinking. Europe, Great Brittan, Mexico, and America. Again a very large area of study. In puts it all in a 7' X 9' book of 203 printed pages. In which he covers a lot of period history and stations. To this add a 98 page Illustration section with 231 views. To me he is  a Architect first, a Railroad Historian second.  
** Harrisburg is not Hamburg. Concord is not Cologne. Boston is not Paris. Philadelphia is not London. We didn't have Greece and Rome. We didn't have the great French, English and Spanish architectural periods. Our cities at the early time just after the start of the Nineteenth century, 1820 when railroads were conceptual here, great architecture fill the great cities of Europe. Carriage terminals in Paris and London were many times larger than the taverns and Hotels that were used for our first station houses. We were a rural country. Our larger cities were along the coast line. The main way to transport goods for us was water born. Ships, barges, canals, were the way to move bulk comities at this time. Europe had a head start on us for the transport of goods. They also developed way to allow for the movement of people from here to there more efficiently. We learned from them.
** This book even though covers Europe better than the US. On stations I was studying I found discrepancy's historically. On the Jersey City terminals  he  misses the first terminal station built by the New Jersey Railroad, opened in 1834. The second NJRR terminal completed and opened in 1857, he, Meeks,  lists it in, and compares it to terminals built from 1860 to 1890. I say he missed the ferry.
** Still "all in all" Meeks has compiled a lot of good information here.  
** I rate this as my third best book on stations.  
frank
 
Edit added 5-31-2016
 
" The Railroad Station" " A Architectural History" by Carroll L.V. Meeks.
* first published in 1956, and again in 1995. My copy is of the 1995 printing.
* The first time I used this book for a reference to what was going on in Jersey City in the 1830 to 1845 with the New Jersey Railroad and Transportation Company, I was disappointed. Coverage of the first railroad terminal when completed in 1834 was nonexistent. Why wouldn't the first railroad terminal servicing New York City from the west side of the Hudson River, not be covered. A Railroad Historian would have done that. The Architectural Historian C.L.V. Meeks did not.  The second and the third railroads chartered in the state of New Jersey being in 1831, the Patterson and Hudson River RR, and 1832 the New Jersey Railroad & Transportation Co. both used the west bank of the Hudson River as there eastern terminus. This alone should have put whatever was built in Jersey City in a historical book on early railroads. Why Meeks didn't do it is known to Meeks alone.  
*  On my first read of the sub-chapter to chapter two " Provincial America" on page 48. Even then I couldn't agree with much there, when compared, to the problems faced by the NJR&TCo.  A lot can be seen and measurement taken from the little information in the three drawings and the period maps of the time. For instance this terminal, which was opened in 1834, was a 3 track train shed used to shelter arriving and departing passengers and equipment. The length due to the angular construction of the building is over 270' on one side and 260 on the other. The width of the train shed is almost 70'. Built as a terminal with tracks entering only one side of the shed structure. Enough room was left between the shed structure and Hudson street to allow for a Head house to be built in the future. Available information shows a head house being there by 1844.  
*  I have a comparison of a station built in Europe with the NJR&TC0. Terminal of 1834. Now Jersey City had a population of around 6,000, when the terminal opened in 1834. Now a railroad was built to take British traffic, passenger and their luggage from the French coastal city of ROUEN to PARIS. It opened in 1843 almost 10 years later. The station in Rouen serviced not only what passenger and freight transferred to this French railroad but local passengers and freight to Paris. Rouen at the time of opening was a city of over 100,000 people. My comparison goes 6,000 people to 100,00 people and their needed services. A Jersey City 3 track train shed, verses a 2 track train shed in Rouen. Neither terminal had a head house at the time but the one at Rouen had a side building for passenger services. The Jersey City terminal has a state of the art ferry terminal across the street which provided all services. No length of with measurements were given for the Rouen terminal. You can make whatever you want from this comparison. A very Large terminal was built in Rouen to replace this one. It was built between 1913 and 1928. A drawing of this new terminal at Rouen is in Meek's book figure 191. Information including a drawing of the Rouen terminal at opening is in the 1834 Illustrated London News on page 330.  
*  
 frank
This is a drawing of the Rouen terminal 1843


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« Last Edit: May 31st, 2016, 6:33am by toptrain » Logged

toptrain
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Re:  Books on Stations
 
« Reply #4 on: Dec 29th, 2015, 2:57pm »
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** This my fifth book covered is a standard of books on railroad stations. Copyrighted in 1970. A large 320 page book on American railroad stations from 1831 to 1920. How is that for a great period.
** The book is " Down at the Depot " by Edwin P. Alexander. **
This is a book familiar to many railroaders. Its 320 large pages 9" X 12" that are filled with large photos.
A book with a very nice difference. Edwin shows along with a photo of the station, another one with the type locomotive that would be seen running to and past this station. 289 stations are listed in the index. The photos are from dozens of different railroads.  
I rate this my 4th best station book.
 frank


« Last Edit: Dec 30th, 2015, 11:33am by toptrain » Logged

toptrain
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Re:  Books on Stations
 
« Reply #5 on: Jan 10th, 2016, 7:26am »
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* A 6th book I'll list now isn't in my collection. It is a book covering all types of railroad structures and opens another way for you to view information on stations.
* On line libraries. Access to book here are fairly unrestricted depending on the site. Google books, Internet Archive, and Hathi trust are good ones.  
The 6th book  is " Buildings and Structures of American railroads." By Walter Gilman Berg. The index is good and info easy to find. You may find this a book of interest.
*  A link to the book, in Google books ;
https://books.google.com/books?id=gIs5AAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=Buildings+and+Structures+of+American+Railroads&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjC2I2Hnp_KAhWC8z4KHYDACxAQuwUILjAA#v=onepage&q=Buildings%20and%20Structures%20of%20American%20Railroads&f=false


« Last Edit: Apr 22nd, 2016, 8:58am by toptrain » Logged

toptrain
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ehbowen
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Re:  Books on Stations
 
« Reply #6 on: Jan 20th, 2016, 10:07pm »
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Passenger Terminals and Trains by Droege is now out of copyright and is available as an electronic edition free of charge through Google Books.


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Re:  Books on Stations
 
« Reply #7 on: Jan 21st, 2016, 2:15am »
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on Jan 20th, 2016, 10:07pm, ehbowen wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Passenger Terminals and Trains by Droege is now out of copyright and is available as an electronic edition free of charge through Google Books.

 
It can be viewed and downloaded at https://books.google.com/books?id=SdwNAAAAYAAJ&dq=Passenger%20Terminals%20and%20Trains%20by%20Droege&pg=PR3#v=onepage&q&f=false
 
Henry


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toptrain
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Re:  Books on Stations
 
« Reply #8 on: Jan 26th, 2016, 4:44pm »
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Well done Eric and Henry good info and source.
 
 
Reply 8,  book 7," Railway Stations, Masterpieces of Architecture " by Charles Sheppard.
 
** A almost 9" wide X 12 1/2" high book of 80 pages. It is large, but not big. Its 80 pages restricts the amount of information here within. The majority of the photos are color. By covering the whole world dont look here for diversity, only huge terminals are mainly covered here. The ones that still remain. Views will show more of the art work and grandiose architecture of these palaces of the railroad world. This railroad station book is just a book of railroad candy. Nothing you can sink your teeth into. A railroad tourist book. Still the pictures are nice. Out of the 10 books I have of stations i rate this book twenty first.  


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Re:  Books on Stations
 
« Reply #9 on: Jan 26th, 2016, 5:07pm »
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Reply 9, book 8, "On the Main Line" by Edwin P. Alexander  
 
* Let's get back to railroading and real station . The ones used to commute and travel. You will see many everyday stations of the Pennsylvania Railroad, Cumberland Valley Railroad, The Philadelphia Wilmington & Baltimore Railroad, The Philadelphia and Erie Railroad. With chapters on the PRR's Philadelphia Division , The Middle Division, The Pittsburg Division, The Conemaugh Division, The Schuylkill Division, and the New York Division. I could do a giant list of station names, but this is a book that naming the stations I like in it, the list would be so long it would give me writers cramps to do it. This is # 1 or 2 book for me.


« Last Edit: Feb 27th, 2016, 8:21am by toptrain » Logged

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Re:  Books on Stations
 
« Reply #10 on: Jan 26th, 2016, 5:29pm »
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"On The Main Line" is an excellent book. I have enjoyed reading it several times. It is subtitled "The Pennsylvania Railroad in the 19th Century."


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Re:  Books on Stations
 
« Reply #11 on: Jan 27th, 2016, 5:29am »
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book 9, Reply 11 " Railway Architecture", By Marcus Binney & David Pearce.
 
** Yep this is not a book on American Stations. These British authors have done well in making this a interesting book. The book is a standard 7 1/2' X 10". It has 256 pages . The small amount of info on US stations is scattered around in the book. Mostly covering various uses made here of our old stations. The bulk of the information covers this small country's railway station very nicely. The majority of stations are smaller city and town stations. Mostly of well made of brick and stone and dating from the 1830's up.  
** For a book of mainly British stations, I enjoy viewing. Binney, and Pearce have done well here.
 
Frank


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Re:  Books on Stations
 
« Reply #12 on: Feb 27th, 2016, 7:36am »
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book 10, reply 12, is another British book on Railway stations. This book takes indexing to a new level for me. It not only indexes stations, but general information and Sources. There also is a forth index on the notes posted at page bottoms. Illustrations are not that numerous and are kept to 6 different locations in this book, making this not a book of photos but of information. Stations listed here are from all over the world.
frank


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Re:  Books on Stations
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« Reply #13 on: Feb 27th, 2016, 10:23am »
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Cover photo of book 1


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« Reply #14 on: Feb 27th, 2016, 10:24am »
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Cover photo of book 2.


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« Reply #15 on: Feb 27th, 2016, 10:25am »
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Cover photo book 3


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« Reply #16 on: Feb 27th, 2016, 10:26am »
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Cover photo of book 4.


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« Reply #17 on: Feb 27th, 2016, 10:33am »
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Cover photo of book 5

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« Reply #18 on: Feb 27th, 2016, 10:47am »
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Book 6 is a on-line book. Here is a copy of its cover.
* "Buildings and Structures of American Railroads".
Link to book; https://books.google.com/books?id=gIs5AAAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=buildings+and+structures+of+american+railroads&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwia0Ju_p6LMAhXJVz4KHbVFCYAQuwUIKDAA#v=onepage&q=buildings%20and%20structures%20of%20american%20railroads&f=false


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« Reply #19 on: Feb 27th, 2016, 10:50am »
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Cover photo of my book 7.


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« Last Edit: Feb 27th, 2016, 10:51am by toptrain » Logged

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