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Washington DC (Union Station) (rshsdepot)
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   Author  Topic: Washington DC (Union Station) (rshsdepot)  (Read 449 times)
Henry
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Historian
Posts: 6109
Washington, DC (Union Station) (rshsdepot)
 
« on: Apr 29th, 2002, 9:47am »
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Date: Mon, 29 Apr 2002 06:28:35 -0400
From: Bernie Wagenblast
Subject: (rshsdepot) Washington, DC (Union Station)
 
 
 
D.C.'s Union Station Is Refurbished
Source: Associated Press
 
WASHINGTON (AP) - Union Station opened in 1908 as a monumental gateway to a
capital just beginning to find its way onto the world stage.
For more than half a century the railroads brought the world to Washington;
the world spilled into the city through the triple arches of a station
intended by its designers to stamp the city indelibly with the mark of
imperial Rome.
 
Union Station's construction just north of the Capital allowed the removal
of the tracks and trains and the old rail station that had scarred the
National Mall for decades. The removal made possible the ambitious reshaping
of the city's ceremonial core in the first decades of the 20th century.
 
At its early zenith, Union Station was a place of a million stories, a
railroad palace that witnessed the arrivals and departures of presidents and
kings, of tourists eager to see government at work, of the bureaucrats and
lawmakers who staffed it and protesters straining to denounce all of the
above.
 
While presidents had their own private quarters, most passengers arrived and
departed by walking past a platoon of stone warriors on guard just below the
coffered, gilded and barrel-vaulted ceiling of the mammoth waiting room.
 
Standing on the broad plaza outside, tour guides pointed out the statues
dedicated to Fire, Electricity, Freedom and Imagination. People approaching
the station could read the lofty inscriptions cut into the granite wall,
including this one:
 
``He that would bring home the wealth of the Indies must carry the wealth of
the Indies with him. So it is in traveling - a man must carry knowledge with
him if he would bring home knowledge.''
 
It is at Union Station where Jimmy Stewart, playing wide-eyed Sen. Jefferson
Smith in Frank Capra's classic 1939 movie, ``Mr. Smith Goes to Washington,''
arrives from the heartland, spies the Capitol dome and, eluding his cynical
handlers, sets out among the monuments to give idealism a good name.
 
But by the 1960s, after a last great surge in train travel during World War
II, the steam-whistle age of the passenger railroad yielded to the speed of
the jet aircraft and the hum of cars on the new Interstate Highway system.
 
Giant railroad stations were suddenly obsolete. Union Station, designed by
architect Daniel Burnham as the foundation stone of a classically beautiful
city, became an expensive white elephant whose most likely future appeared
to be demolition by neglect.
 
The railroads slashed schedules and began to bulldoze the stations that had
once been their pride. People began calling Union Station a mausoleum, a
quiet catacomb, a ``depressing cavern where people no longer come.''
 
Searching for a future for a historic building many people still loved, the
government stumbled into a blind alley: The station was converted into a
national visitors' center, a headquarters for the celebration of the 1976
Bicentennial, the 200th anniversary of American independence.
 
The key to making it work was the construction of a bus and auto garage
behind the station. But the money never flowed and parking never
materialized. Little was spent on the urgent repairs needed on the structure
itself.
 
The center's chief feature was a visual orientation center excavated in the
floor of the waiting room. Instantly dubbed ``the pit,'' it permitted
visitors to descend into semidarkness to view a slide show of the city's
sights, including the Capitol dome, which they could see for themselves
simply by walking outside.
 
In the end, the visitors center had few visitors. The actual rail station
was exiled in unglamorous quarters a long walk down the tracks.
 
The ``pit'' closed in 1979, the visitors center three years later. By then,
water was cascading through leaks in the roof, dislodging chunks of plaster.
The old station was closed. Amtrak passengers were shunted to their trains
through a plywood maze.
 
Union Station rose again in the 1980s, its revival a tale of a
private-public enterprise, of repair and careful restoration. When it
reopened in 1988 it had galleries of shops and restaurants, a food court and
a nine-screen movie theater.
 
At its heart it was still a railway station. And once again it was a gateway
to a capital city.
 
---
 
The story of Union Station, including the saga of its revival, is told in
``Union Station, A History of Washington's Grand Terminal,'' by Carol M.
Highsmith and Ted Landphair and published by Chelsea Publishing Co.
 
 
=================================
The Railroad Station Historical Society maintains a database of existing
railroad structures at: http://www.rrshs.org


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Henry
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Posts: 6109
Union Station-Washington, DC (rshsdepot)
 
« Reply #1 on: Aug 5th, 2002, 5:09pm »
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Date: Mon, 05 Aug 2002 15:59:54 -0400
From: Bernie Wagenblast
Subject: (rshsdepot) Union Station-Washington, DC
 
 
 
Union Station site a go
 
Akridge said to have won rights to develop prime D.C. parcel
 
Suzanne White   Staff Reporter - Washington Business Journal
 
The John Akridge Cos. has been chosen to develop about 15 acres over
Amtrak's rail tracks at Union Station, according to a government source.
 
The General Services Administration awarded Washington Bell, an Akridge
affiliate, air rights July 12 after it submitted the highest offer of $10
million. Akridge beat out Louis Dreyfus Property Group, which also submitted
a bid in May.
 
John Akridge Cos. would not confirm that it was selected by GSA.
 
"We are in discussions but nothing has been finalized," says Shannon Small,
a spokeswoman for Akridge (http://www.akridge.com).
 
GSA expects to close on the sale in early to mid-September, meeting a Sept.
30 deadline set by Congress.
 
The federal government obtained the site from Amtrak after one of its
bailouts of the railroad. In 1997, Congress asked that GSA sell the property
at fair market value, depositing the proceeds in the general fund by the end
of fiscal 2002.
 
D.C.-based Akridge is no stranger to large-scale development projects
downtown. It is among the most prolific developers in the District, with
projects such as Gallery Place in Chinatown and the 270,000-square-foot
speculative office building at 1201 Eye St. NW, leased this year by the
National Park Service.
 
Considering the demand for large chunks of office space, the health of the
residential market and the prospect of a Major League Baseball team and the
Olympics, there might not have been a better time for GSA to sell the space.
 
The site stretches from the north side of Union Station to K Street NE, not
including the H Street bridge. This is the last infill development
opportunity abutting Union Station.
 
Nearby, two federal agency headquarters are under construction on either
side of H Street: the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms to the north,
and the Securities and Exchange Commission to the south.
 
It is estimated that a 1.1 million- to 3 million-square-foot building could
fit on the site. Although it's a prime location, development is quite
complex and the expense will be great.
 
Development must start at least 40 feet above the tracks, and there must not
be any interruption in Amtrak's business. Price estimates for site
preparation alone have been staggering, ranging from $70 million to $100
million.
 
In the mid-1990s, the Amtrak air-rights site was considered for the new
Washington Convention Center, now under construction seven blocks to the
west.
 
Earlier this year, Bobby Goldwater, president of the D.C. Sports &
Entertainment Commission, said the site was too small for a baseball stadium
but would be great for a field house, theaters or parking for the Olympics.
 
D.C. officials saw potential in the site as well - and even considered
bidding for it - but they couldn't put a proposal together in time for the
May deadline.
 
E-MAIL: slwhite@bizjournals.com PHONE: 703/816-0331
 
 
=================================
The Railroad Station Historical Society maintains a database of existing
railroad structures at: http://www.rrshs.org


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Henry
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Historian
Posts: 6109
Union Station-Washington, DC (rshsdepot)
 
« Reply #2 on: Jun 25th, 2004, 10:34am »
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Date: Fri, 25 Jun 2004 06:16:28 -0400
From: Bernie Wagenblast
Subject: Union Station-Washington, DC (rshsdepot)
 
From today's Washington Times.
 
Bernie Wagenblast
 
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Vibrant Union Station a destination in itself
 
 
While 66,000 Metro passengers, 10,000 Amtrak riders, 25,000 MARC train
travelers and another 2,500 Virginia Railway Express customers scurry each
day through Washington's Union Station, amid the hustle and bustle of
commuters and tourists there are plenty of people with no intention of
traveling farther.
 
For complete article:
http://washingtontimes.com/weekend/20040623-104746-4829r.htm
 
=================================
The Railroad Station Historical Society maintains a database of existing
railroad structures at: http://www.rrshs.org


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Passenger_Extra
Historian
Posts: 1284
Re: Union Station-Washington, DC (rshsdepot)
 
« Reply #3 on: Jul 9th, 2004, 10:53am »
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Since I was a little kid, Ive always been impressed by Union Station.  
 
It belongs in Washington!  When you walk onto the concourse there you KNOW you are in the capitol city.
 
I think its darkest hour was when they decided to turn it into a "National Visitor's Center", and dug that God ugly hole in the center of the main waiting room.  
 
I remember it best though as a youngster in the 50's standing out by the gates.  The smell of diesel fuel, and the almost subliminal rumble of idling EMD E-6 and E-7's, baggage wagons, and hustling red caps, and the anticipation of going somewhere.  
 
Air terminals just can't quite duplicate that.


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Not good on trains 1, 2, 5, 6, 25 & 26 west of Washington D.C. and trains 27 & 28.
Walt_C
Historian
Posts: 2934
Re: Union Station-Washington, DC (rshsdepot)
 
« Reply #4 on: Jul 9th, 2004, 4:26pm »
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Union Station was intended to match the National Monuments, which is why it looks as good as it does. In 1929, by an act of Congress,  the Capitol Grounds were extended to Union Station, requiring a drastic re-routing of the streetcar lines which passed in front of the station. This was accomplished by construction of a trolley tunnel ( with a fountain on top) to remove the tracks from the Union Station Plaza. The plans for this were drawn up, at the direction of the Congress, without consulting either streetcar company ( there were two at that time), but the cost of the project ( about $375,000) was paid by the companies.--- This shows how important the monumental nature of the station was, and is, to the Congress.

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Please move to the rear and speed your ride-Regards, Walt
Jim

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Posts: 240
Re: Union Station-Washington, DC (rshsdepot)
 
« Reply #5 on: Jul 9th, 2004, 5:28pm »
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The article forgot to mention one important former tenant railroad, the PRR, later PC.  The PRR's Federal Express staged the most spectacular accident at the station in Jan. 1953, crashing into the concourse basement after its brakes failed at 70 mph.

« Last Edit: Jul 9th, 2004, 5:32pm by Jim » Logged
Passenger_Extra
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Posts: 1284
Re: Union Station-Washington, DC (rshsdepot)
 
« Reply #6 on: Jul 12th, 2004, 11:03am »
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Yeah that was a hell of a mess too!
 


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Not good on trains 1, 2, 5, 6, 25 & 26 west of Washington D.C. and trains 27 & 28.
Walt_C
Historian
Posts: 2934
Re: Union Station-Washington, DC (rshsdepot)
 
« Reply #7 on: Jul 12th, 2004, 11:17am »
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That wreck was caused by a defective angle-cock on the third of the New Haven passenger cars in the 13 car consist. The original New Haven Crew had had trouble with the valve somewhere in Rhode Island, but "fixed" it, and didn't report the problem to the new engine crew that took over in New Haven when the switch was made to the electric locomotive. Naturally the PRR crew which took over at NYP knew nothing about the problem, and the train made all of the stops, including Baltimore. However when the first brake application was made approaching Union Station, the angle-cock stuck again, preventing the brakes on the 10 rear cars from being applied. The GG1 ( No. 4876) and the first three cars essentially skidded all the way into Union Station, being pushed by the trailing 10 cars. The train was doing about 30 MPH when it ran out of track.

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Please move to the rear and speed your ride-Regards, Walt
Henry
Moderator
Historian
Posts: 6109
Washington Union Station (rshsdepot)
 
« Reply #8 on: Jul 24th, 2006, 10:34am »
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Date: Sun, 23 Jul 2006 18:26:56 -0400
From: William Wright <wrightwm at earthlink dot net>
Subject: Washington Union Station (rshsdepot)
 
I've learned a lot from this list as I've been writing my history of  
Union Station in Washington, and I wanted to give those of you who  
are interested the chance to see how I've been using what I've  
learned.  Now available for downloading from  
www.washingtonunionstation.com are my first three chapters, which  
describe railroads in 19th century Washington, planning the station,  
and its construction.  Please be aware that the chapters, because  
they include pictures and maps, are in large (550 - 700 kb) pdf files.
 
I welcome your comments, corrections, and suggestions, and would  
particularly like to hear from people who know of material that  
describes the experiences of individuals, whether travelers or  
workers, at the terminal before 1950. Also helpful would be  
references that show how the station in Washington affected those in  
other cities -- for example, I've seen references that talk about how  
the design of Kansas City Union borrowed design features from  
Washington.
 
Thanks for your help.
 
Bill Wright
=================================
The Railroad Station Historical Society maintains a database of existing
railroad structures at: http://www.rrshs.org


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CSXvet

Posts: 814
Re: Washington Union Station (rshsdepot)
 
« Reply #9 on: Jul 26th, 2006, 7:41pm »
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I've only downloaded the first chapter, covering the 19th century, and from that sample the work appears to be beautifully researched and well-written. I did not a a couple of minor errors, which I'll note off-line when I get my info together, but otherwise I learned much.  
 
One thing that might be explored further and noted in the text is the PRR's political clout in the immediate post-Civil War era.  Sen. Simon Cameron of Pennsylvania was a major Republican power in this period and a staunch PRR ally -- both political and financial.  He and Tom Scott made a lethal combination in getting the Pennsy's way in Washington -- and, at the same time, walling the B&O off from its southern connections.  It also might be noted that after the Civil War, both the Pennsy and B&O had ambitions of extending into the Deep South, and Washington was a key battleground in their stategies.  Thanks to Cameron and Scott, the Pennsy got exclusive use of the Long Bridge, leaving the B&O to struggle along with an awkward carferry operation at Alexandria and no direct connection whatever to the RF&P.  Through its subsidiary lines between Washington and Quantico, the Pennsy essentially monopolized the Richmond gateway.  The 1873 panic and subsequent depression shortstopped both railroads' "southern strategy," but the B&O was still left stranded until the early 1900s.
 
Union Station was made possible in part because of the Morgan-Cassatt "community of interest" program, which attempted to stabilize what had become a wastefully overcompetitive situation in the East and Midwest.  The B&O came under PRR control in 1900, and the two railroads essentially became partners in the Washington gateway facilities.  This included not only Union Station, but the formation of the Richmond-Washington Company that established a joint six-railroad control of the RF&p and a neutral freight classification facility at Potomac Yard.


« Last Edit: Jul 26th, 2006, 7:48pm by CSXvet » Logged
silver_champion
Historian
Posts: 888
Re: Washington Union Station (rshsdepot)
 
« Reply #10 on: Jul 27th, 2006, 8:08am »
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Henry, thanks for posting the website on Washington Union  Station. I just loved it. I am a history and a train nut.  Do you or anyone is know of a site on Penn Station

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Henry
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Historian
Posts: 6109
Re: Washington Union Station (rshsdepot)
 
« Reply #11 on: Jul 27th, 2006, 2:29pm »
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I don't know of any sites like that one for Penn Station, but googling "Pennsylvania Station" (with the quotes) can keep you busy for quite a while.
 
http://www.google.com/search?q=%22Pennsylvania+Station%22
 
Some notable results:
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pennsylvania_Station_%28New_York_City%29
 
http://www.answers.com/topic/pennsylvania-station-new-york-city
 
http://www.greatbuildings.com/buildings/Pennsylvania_Station.html
 
http://www.nyc-architecture.com/GON/GON004.htm
 
http://www.forgotten-ny.com/STREET%20SCENES/Penn%20Station/penn.html
 
And many more...
 
Henry


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Henry
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Posts: 6109
Union Station - Washington, DC (rshsdepot)
 
« Reply #12 on: Oct 2nd, 2006, 5:32pm »
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Date: Mon, 2 Oct 2006 10:36:21 EDT
From: Bernie Wagenblast
Subject: Union Station - Washington, DC (rshsdepot)
 
From today's Washington Post.
 
Bernie Wagenblast
 
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 
 New Life Above the Union Station  Tracks
 
 
By Dana Hedgpeth  
District-based developer John E. ``Chip`` Akridge III has closed on a deal to  
 buy 15 acres of air rights above the railroad tracks at Union Station with  
plans  to build a $1 billion mixed-use project.  
Akridge paid $10 million to the General Services Administration, which owned  
the air rights. It is the first time the agency, the federal government`s  
property manager, has sold air rights. Executives at Akridge and the Government  
Acountability Office said they worked on the complicated deal with Amtrak for  
 four years.  
Akridge`s tentative plans call for about 3 million square feet of offices,  
restaurants, shops, condos, apartments and a hotel. The buildings will be on a  
concrete platform, supported by columns, about 20 feet above the tracks.  
An atrium will connect Union Station with H Street NE and the surrounding  
neighborhood, where new housing and stores have been built. The project will be  
similar to projects above railroad tracks in Chicago, New York and  
Philadelphia.  
It will be called Burnham Place after the architect of Union Station, Daniel  
H. Burnham. Akridge executives said they plan to market housing in the  
project  to politicians and aides who want to live near the Capitol and the office  
space  to trade associations, law firms, accountants and consultants.  
Completion is years away.  
Akridge`s project must go through planning and design, then get zoning and  
other approvals. Construction of the concrete platform is likely to begin in  
late 2008, executives said, and take about three years. The rest of the project  
 would be built after that.  
``It`s a once-in-100-year opportunity to be able to develop a site within two  
 blocks of the U.S. Capitol,`` said Joe Svatos, senior vice president at  
Akridge.  
 
=================================
The Railroad Station Historical Society maintains a database of existing
railroad structures at: http://www.rrshs.org


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silver_champion
Historian
Posts: 888
Re: Union Station - Washington, DC (rshsdepot)
 
« Reply #13 on: Dec 29th, 2006, 6:57pm »
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b These project at Union Station would look  at the 30St. Station in Philly.

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Henry
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Historian
Posts: 6109
Washington DC (Union Station) (rshsdepot)
 
« Reply #14 on: Sep 30th, 2008, 3:56pm »
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Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2008 15:45:53 EDT
From: Bernie Wagenblast
Subject: Washington DC (Union Station) (rshsdepot)
 
From The Associated Press.
 
Bernie Wagenblast
 
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 
Washington's Union Station celebrates 100 years
 
By SARAH KARUSH
 
Less than 30 years ago, Union Station, the grand gateway to the nation's
capital, seemed to be going the way of the steam engine.
 
Like passenger rail itself, the Beaux Arts building was in decline, with
chunks of the ceiling falling off and mushrooms growing on the floor.
 
Today, the 100-year-old building is a thriving transportation hub, a
shopping mall and one of Washington's most visited sites with more than 32 million
people passing through a year. The station will celebrate its centennial this
weekend (Oct. 4-5) with a display of historic locomotives and rail cars
rarely seen in one place.
 
"The history of this station tracks in some ways with the railroad
industry," said Joe McHugh, vice president for government affairs at Amtrak. The
railroad, which is headquartered at Union Station, is taking the lead in the
anniversary celebrations.
 
Amtrak was formed out of the ruins of once-grand private passenger rail
service, which declined in the mid-20th century with the rise of air travel and
the automobile. Recently, rail travel has undergone a modest resurgence. Some
25.8 million passengers took Amtrak in the last fiscal year-the most since the
government-owned corporation started business in 1971.
 
The Union Station centennial falls on the 20th anniversary of the station's
1988 rehabilitation, and Amtrak is using it as an opportunity to showcase one
of the nation's most successful makeovers.
 
"The restoration of the building gave us back one of the great
architectural landmarks of Washington," said Dwight Young, who works for the National
Trust for Historic Preservation.
 
Daniel Burnham, the principal architect of the 1893 Chicago World's Fair,
designed the station to serve as "a monumental gateway to Washington," Young
said. His creation opened in 1907, though it wasn't completed until the
following year.
 
In the early decades, nearly everyone, including presidents and visiting
royalty, arrived in Washington by train, making Union Station the first thing
they saw.
 
On Jan. 15, 1953, a runaway train crashed through the main concourse. The
floor collapsed under the weight of the locomotive, but nobody was killed. Just
four days later, the damage was hardly visible when a special train for
President Eisenhower's inauguration rolled into the station, according to an
official station history.
 
But as passenger trains fell out of favor, so did big train stations. New
York's original Pennsylvania Station, a similarly grand, classically-inspired
structure, was razed in 1964.
 
Union Station survived, thanks in part to an ill-fated project to remake the
building into a national visitor's center for the country's bicentennial.
The marble floor was torn up to carve out a theater for an elaborate slideshow
presentation.
 
The visitor's center was a flop, and soon the station was shuttered because
of structural problems. Passengers used a makeshift Amtrak terminal behind
Union Station, with a covered walkway around the building to get to the street.
 
A public-private partnership spent $160 million to restore the building. It
reopened in 1988-once again a train station, but this time with high-end
retail and restaurants.
 
Amtrak has been trying to foster similar efforts-albeit on a smaller scale-
around the country through its Great American Stations program. A renovated
station can help spur development of neglected downtowns, advocates of such
projects say.
 
Before Union Station's renovation, the thriving Capitol Hill neighborhood
where it is located was "depressed," said David Ball, president of Union
Station Redevelopment Corp., the nonprofit that holds a long-term lease to the
building from the U.S. Department of Transportation. "We were sort of the
catalyst."
 
The centennial celebration is Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., and Sunday, noon-4
p.m. The free event will feature an exhibit of historic locomotives and
passenger cars from the heyday of rail travel, as well as modern Amtrak equipment.
Visitors will be able to walk through the cars and even buy souvenir stamps
inside an old railway post office car. Archival photos of the station will
also be on display.
 
=================================
The Railroad Station Historical Society maintains a database of existing
railroad structures at: http://www.rrshs.org


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ClydeDET
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Posts: 4793
Re: Washington DC (Union Station) (rshsdepot)
 
« Reply #15 on: Oct 1st, 2008, 6:22pm »
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My first visit to Union Station was in 1966. It was a bit worn, but otherwise OK, you could see what it once was. In 1972 and 1973 and then 1974 it was - being destroyed for the Visitor Center. Caught the Crescent there in January 77 (might have been '76, but i think '77) to get to Charlottesville for a conference after i got to Washington just in tome to discover all the flights out ahd been cancelled for a huge snowstorm (I hadn't planned to fly to Charlottesville anyway). It wasn't very impressive as the Visitor Center. Whoever was responsible for that bad idea should have been taken out and shot against some convenient wall.
 
Haven't been there since they finally redid it, but thre pictures and articles I've seen have suggested it is well-done and a satisfactory job.


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Henry
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Posts: 6109
Washington, DC (Union Station) (rshsdepot)
 
« Reply #16 on: Aug 12th, 2011, 12:59pm »
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Date: Fri, 12 Aug 2011 10:11:58 -0400
From: Bernie Wagenblast  
Subject: Washington, DC (Union Station) (rshsdepot)
 
Union Station Stakeholders
Float Renovation Plans
 
Link
to article in the Washington Business
Journal:
 
http://www.bizjournals.com/washington/blog/2011/08/union-station-stakeholders-float.html
 
Bernie Wagenblast
 
www.bwcommunications.net
 
=================================
The Railroad Station Historical Society maintains a database of existing
railroad structures at: http://www.rrshs.org


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Henry
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Historian
Posts: 6109
Washington, DC (Union Station) (rshsdepot)
 
« Reply #17 on: Dec 7th, 2011, 5:12pm »
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Date: Wed, 7 Dec 2011 07:42:37 -0500 (EST)
From: Bernie Wagenblast  
Subject: Washington, DC (Union Station) (rshsdepot)
 
August Quake Costs Union
Station Millions, Months of Repair
 
Link
to story on WTOP Radio:
 
http://www.wtop.com/?sid=2659123&nid=654
 
Bernie Wagenblast
 
www.bwcommunications.net
 
=================================
The Railroad Station Historical Society maintains a database of existing
railroad structures at: http://www.rrshs.org


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Henry
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Posts: 6109
Washington, DC (Union Station) (rshsdepot)
 
« Reply #18 on: Dec 9th, 2011, 1:45pm »
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Date: Fri, 9 Dec 2011 08:09:03 -0500 (EST)
From: Bernie Wagenblast  
Subject: Washington, DC (Union Station) (rshsdepot)
 
A More Perfect Union Station - DC's Train Station is a Mess. Again.
 
Link to article in the Washington City Paper:
 
http://www.washingtoncitypaper.com/articles/41832/a-more-perfect-union-station/
 
Bernie Wagenblast
 
www.bwcommunications.net
 
=================================
The Railroad Station Historical Society maintains a database of existing
railroad structures at: http://www.rrshs.org


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Henry
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Posts: 6109
Washington, DC (Union Station) (rshsdepot)
 
« Reply #19 on: Apr 9th, 2012, 12:00pm »
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Date: Mon, 9 Apr 2012 07:25:27 -0400 (EDT)
From: Bernie Wagenblast  
Subject: Washington, DC (Union Station) (rshsdepot)
 
Union Station's $35 Million Makeover
 
Link to photo essay in The Washington Post:
 
http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/capitalbusiness/union-stations-35-million-makeover/2012/04/08/gIQAtphf4S_gallery.html
 
Bernie Wagenblast
 
www.bwcommunications.net
 
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The Railroad Station Historical Society maintains a database of existing
railroad structures at: http://www.rrshs.org


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