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Buffalo, NY DL&W
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JBS
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Re: Buffalo, NY (DL&W)
 
« Reply #20 on: Sep 8th, 2005, 5:51pm »
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couple more photos here:
http://wnyheritagepress.org/photos_week_2004/dlw_terminal/dlw_terminal.htm


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RARITAN_CLOCKER
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Re: Buffalo, NY (DL&W)
 
« Reply #21 on: Sep 8th, 2005, 6:10pm »
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     JBS: MAGNIFICENT!! Thanks for sharing these additional photos!! Truly a majestic structure, so typical of the Lackawanna!! And this station was opened only a few months before my mother was born!! I especially loved reading about the "Ladies Parlor", so typical in train stations of that era. A true product of a VERY genteel and elegant era!!

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RARITAN_CLOCKER
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Re: Buffalo, NY (DL&W)
 
« Reply #22 on: Sep 8th, 2005, 8:48pm »
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    The following is from: "ERIE-LACKAWANNA: DEATH OF AN AMERICAN RAILROAD" by H. Rodger Grant: "............the terminal building (at Buffalo) was a monument to the extravagance of another day; its cavernous immensity a bit embarrasing when contrasted to its diminishing usefullness. The sweeping marble staircases that led to the second-story concourse, the seventy-five foot ceilings, magnificent in their decadence, symbolized a bygone day." Rest In Peace, Buffalo Terminal.

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HwyHaulier
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Re: Buffalo, NY (DL&W)
 
« Reply #23 on: Sep 10th, 2005, 10:18pm »
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To introduce myself. A regular member here has urged, for months, that with my interests in the industry, this is a "must join" group. I've watched various threads for months, and a sincere salute to the very high quality of what I have seen.....
 
I have used the HwyHaulier handle for many years. Much of my work experience has been on the rubber tired side. I am something of a complete fanatic about the DL&W. In the 1960s, I worked for a number years with a large, national motor carrier, managed by a very fine group of people who left Hoboken, post the merger (so called) with that other line. I started service with the firm at its station in BUF.
 
This DL&W - BUF thread has put me over the edge. On topic, what could possibly have been all six stations serving BUF in 1923? I can figure one each: NYC, LV, DLW, ERIE, PA.  
 
But, what of the sixth? B&O (BR&P)? WAB? NKP? The last shud be over the top, as I'll conjecture it was in early with DLW.......
 
Many thanks for the various BUF views in this thread......
 
.............Vern.............Bel Air, MD...............
 
 
 


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RARITAN_CLOCKER
Former Member
Re: Buffalo, NY (DL&W)
 
« Reply #24 on: Sep 10th, 2005, 10:45pm »
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 Vern: First of all, WELCOME ABOARD!! Second, I'm glad you FINALLY took my advice and joined!! Rail forums do NOT get ANY better than this!! You have some real masterminds here, regarding the rails!! Hey, guys, just know that Vern is a great guy and a good personal friend of mine........not only is he a big DL&W fan, but also, he is VERY knowledgeable on the trucking industry past and president, and, of course, piggyback operations!! Vern, again, welcome to the Rolls-Royce of Rail Forums!!

« Last Edit: Sep 10th, 2005, 10:45pm by RARITAN_CLOCKER » Logged
arnstg
Railfan
Posts: 212
Re: Buffalo, NY (DL&W)
 
« Reply #25 on: Sep 10th, 2005, 11:14pm »
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Great discussion on this fine old terminal. I used to work once in a while Downtown from 12M-8AM. Made sure to get there early so as I could catch  the inbound NKP connection for the train  to NJ.
 
  Fine old station. Sad to see what it has become. Oh to be able let you visulize what I saw.
 
  Regarding the Library of Congress descriptions for their photos: I don't know who did them but their sense of direction is way off. The first photo says they are shooting from the end of Main St. towards the southeast . Come on.  
 
 Surely they mean Southwest. Unfortunately , other photos have similar errors.
 
  Hmmm. I wonder where he /she got their compass!
 
 
  Hope you  keep us to date on what's happening.


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RARITAN_CLOCKER
Former Member
Re: Buffalo, NY (DL&W)
 
« Reply #26 on: Sep 11th, 2005, 12:44am »
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    Back in the early 60s, I can remember seeing NKP Pullmans at Hoboken; when did the NKP through-car service to Hoboken via the E-L  stop? I can remember, as best I can, seeing the NKP cars at Hoboken around, say, 1963 and 1964.

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HwyHaulier
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Re: Buffalo, NY (DL&W)
 
« Reply #27 on: Sep 11th, 2005, 11:47am »
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Raritan, et. al. .....
 
Thanks for welcoming post! Ref. NKP. Might I conjecture that the known date of close of DL&W -BUF coincided with end of CGO - BUF service over NKP? That thru service must have become quite tenuous post merger. One could see who was in charge: The massive trashing and destruction of perfectly good DL&W rail lines, thus breaking the old, established routings.....
 
Errata. In my 10:18 pm of last nite, I don't know why I had six stations on my mind. Too late an hour? I looked at message #6, with this, again....
 
"...The D.L.&W. was the oldest railroad station existing in Buffalo in 1979.  It was also the last of the five stations which operated in Buffalo in 1923 at the city's zenith as a major rail center.  Set on a prominent riverfront site, it retained its integrity of design."  
 
So, guess I identified the five in my message. Now a matter of figuring who ran where? Five stations hints B&O had already agreed with DLW to run the BR&P schedules in/ out DLW...... And, just what did dear, old WAB do, anyway?
 
Henry - In your 9/8 @ 1:24 pm. I was tickled with your summary of present day BUF. I lived there, 1962 thru 1964. I always walked around with the perception the clock stopped on Black Friday, 1929, and I was in some kind of a time warp. Lots of glorious sights, tho most in a somewhat shabby condition. I don't like reading too much BUF material in one sitting; it's much too depressing! Ah, they have all moved to Tampa!
 
..................Vern..................
 


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Henry
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Re: Buffalo, NY (DL&W)
 
« Reply #28 on: Sep 11th, 2005, 11:52am »
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on Sep 10th, 2005, 10:18pm, HwyHaulier wrote:       (Click here for original message)
8<--
This DL&W - BUF thread has put me over the edge. On topic, what could possibly have been all six stations serving BUF in 1923? I can figure one each: NYC, LV, DLW, ERIE, PA.  
8
But, what of the sixth? B&O (BR&P)? WAB? NKP? The last shud be over the top, as I'll conjecture it was in early with DLW.......
8<--

 
Vern,
 
Welcome to the forum!
 
I am curious as to the context of the statement that there were 6 stations serving Buffalo in 1923. There were far more than 6 stations, but most didn't serve through trains.
 
The NYC had the Union Depot on Exchange St, but also had an East Buffalo depot as the Union Depot was downtown and not on the main line.  
 
The Erie had its Michigan St depot, but also had an East Buffalo depot (not far from NYC's E Buffalo depot) where the Niagara Falls Branch diverged from the main line.  
 
DL&W and LV had their downtown terminals.
 
Grand Trunk had a depot in Black Rock by the International Bridge at the connection to the NYC's Belt Line.
 
PRR had already moved into the NYC's Union Depot on Exchange. Their little facility was only a stone's throw from the NYC's Union Depot and was the equivalent of an Amshack a century ago.
 
NKP, B&O/BR&P and WAB shared the DL&W Terminal. Prior to its consruction the BR&P used NYC's Union Depot.
 
The NYC had 15 other stations on its Belt Line for commuter service and one more station ("North Buffalo") just north of the Belt Line on the Niagara Falls branch. Belt Line commuter service was discontinued some time after WW I.
 
The Erie had 7 more stations in Buffalo on its line to Niagar Falls from East Buffalo; Sycamore, Genessee, East Ferry, East Delavan, Kensington, Main St and International Jct. There were also at least two more stations served by Buffalo & Southwestern trains to Olean and Salamanca. I don't know how long the Buffalo local stops on the NF and B&SW trains lasted, probably until WW I and not much after then.
 
The DL&W had at least 1 more station (at Main St) on its line to Black Rock and the International Bridge. I imagine they had some sort of depot at Black Rock too. I doubt passenger service on that line lasted to WW I.
 
In 1923 many interurbans will still going and I believe there was sort of a traction terminal downtown at Lafayette Square.
 
In 1923 the stations serving at least some of the through trains would have been: NYC Exchange St, *possibly* NYC East Buffalo, DL&W Terminal, Erie Michigan St, Erie East Buffalo, LV Terminal and Grand Trunk Black Rock.  
 
In 1926 the railroads with passenger service at Buffalo accounting for 151 expresses and 140 locals included: NYC (NYC&HRR, LS&MS, MC, NYWS&B, TH&B, B&NF, B&L, C&NF); Erie (A&B/B&NYC, SB&EJ, B&SW/B&J); PRR (BNY&P/WNY&P, BC&P); DL&W; BR&P; NKP; LV; B&W; GT; Wabash.
 
I am sure this makes things more confusing than ever, but I hope it helps some.
 
Henry


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Henry
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Re: Buffalo, NY (DL&W)
 
« Reply #29 on: Sep 11th, 2005, 12:04pm »
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on Sep 11th, 2005, 11:47am, HwyHaulier wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Raritan, et. al. .....
 
Thanks for welcoming post! Ref. NKP. Might I conjecture that the known date of close of DL&W -BUF coincided with end of CGO - BUF service over NKP? That thru service must have become quite tenuous post merger. One could see who was in charge: The massive trashing and destruction of perfectly good DL&W rail lines, thus breaking the old, established routings.....

 
I believe NKP/EL through service continued from "East Buffalo" until at least the N&W/NKP/WAB merger.
 
Quote:

 
Errata. In my 10:18 pm of last nite, I don't know why I had six stations on my mind. Too late an hour? I looked at message #6, with this, again....
 
"...The D.L.&W. was the oldest railroad station existing in Buffalo in 1979.  It was also the last of the five stations which operated in Buffalo in 1923 at the city's zenith as a major rail center.  Set on a prominent riverfront site, it retained its integrity of design."  
 
So, guess I identified the five in my message. Now a matter of figuring who ran where? Five stations hints B&O had already agreed with DLW to run the BR&P schedules in/ out DLW...... And, just what did dear, old WAB do, anyway?

 
I think I covered that in the previous post.
 
Quote:

Henry - In your 9/8 @ 1:24 pm. I was tickled with your summary of present day BUF. I lived there, 1962 thru 1964. I always walked around with the perception the clock stopped on Black Friday, 1929, and I was in some kind of a time warp. Lots of glorious sights, tho most in a somewhat shabby condition. I don't like reading too much BUF material in one sitting; it's much too depressing! Ah, they have all moved to Tampa!

 
I have been living in Ohio for the past 5 years, but I'll be moving back to Buffalo soon. My family, friends and business are there. I can't say if I will stay there for the rest of my life or not, I have this dream of finding a house in the country on a busy main line or at a junction and Ohio or Pennsylvania may be to where I retire.
 
Until NYS and Buffalo politicians made living there almost unbearable, I really loved living in Buffalo. With mother's health deteriorating quickly I really need to be back there with her now.
 
Henry


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HwyHaulier
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Re: Buffalo, NY (DL&W)
 
« Reply #30 on: Sep 11th, 2005, 12:26pm »
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Henry -
 
Many thanks for detailed view of stations in BUF. In your #6, I ran with the view the five stations only embraced major sites. I knew - from walking around - there were endless "flags", "conditionals" and commute stops, throughout the region.
 
Concur, ref. NKP. Once the lights went out at the foot of Main Street, E-L had the fall back play to East Buffalo.....
 
An aside, sort of. Reasons to move to BUF. The great news is there are truly super deals on the housing. Not much of this high flying nonsense, seen in the BAL market, of some crappy little 2 BR bungalow moving out @ $500K. Also, concur BUF is fine, as long as one can get their head on straight in dealing with the weather. Them's that can't deal with it best go to Tampa or Tempe......
 
..............Vern...............
 


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RARITAN_CLOCKER
Former Member
Re: Buffalo, NY (DL&W)
 
« Reply #31 on: Sep 11th, 2005, 12:52pm »
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       Fellows: Many folks (even many railfans) tend to forget Buffalo's role as a busy railroad center through the 50s and into the 60s. The E-L closed the magnificent old DL&W station in 1962, but continued to operate out of Babcock St. until 1969. The NYC's mammoth Buffalo Central Terminal soon became nothing more than a massive, echoing mausoleum. The LV's elegant, 1916-era terminal was shut down in the mid 50's and, today, no longer exists. If Buffalo's railroad heritage is pretty much ignored these days, rest assured that the DL&W's efforts in helping to develop the greater Buffalo area are virtually forgotten altogether. Truly sad that so much of Buffalo's great railroad heritage has already been lost to the ages. BTW.....do any former DL&W viaducts remain in the city? Or, have they all been destroyed as well?

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Henry
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Re: Buffalo, NY (DL&W)
 
« Reply #32 on: Sep 11th, 2005, 1:13pm »
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on Sep 11th, 2005, 12:52pm, RARITAN_CLOCKER wrote:       (Click here for original message)
8<---
 If Buffalo's railroad heritage is pretty much ignored these days, rest assured that the DL&W's efforts in helping to develop the greater Buffalo area are virtually forgotten altogether. Truly sad that so much of Buffalo's great railroad heritage has already been lost to the ages. BTW.....do any former DL&W viaducts remain in the city? Or, have they all been destroyed as well?

 
There is very little awareness of how the RR's helped build Buffalo. Most people think the Erie Canal built Buffalo, but it was only a minor player after about 1850.
 
I'm not sure what you mean by viaducts. If you mean substantial bridges then no, those are all gone.  
 
There is only one intact DL&W bridge in the city that I can recall at the moment. That is a plate girder bridge at Military Rd on the Black Rock branch of which only a short remnant remains and is used to occasionally serve a business with loads of plastic pellets. "LACKAWANNA RAILROAD" on the bridge girders were finally painted over about 8 years ago. I believe I have the last photos ever taken of that bridge before it was repainted, I shot it while the painting crews were there!
 
Most of the DL&W Black Rock branch right of way in the Buffalo area has been absolutely obliteratated and in many areas has been built over in the past 15 years. It's heart breaking.  
 
Henry


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RARITAN_CLOCKER
Former Member
Re: Buffalo, NY (DL&W)
 
« Reply #33 on: Sep 11th, 2005, 3:55pm »
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  Henry: To think that the DL&W was once so prominent in Buffalo, and now, almost all traces of this noble carrier have been obliterated....DANG!! NO RESPECT FOR HISTORY!! Just keep on building those Wal-Marts, Home Depots, Taco Bells, malls, condos, and townhouses.........with NO respect WHATSOEVER for the history bieng destroyed!!  "SAYS PHOEBE SNOW/WHO CANNOT GO/UPON HER TRIP TO BUFFALO/THINGS ARE NOT RIGHT/THERE'S NO DELIGHT/THEY'VE RUINED MY ROAD OF ANTHRACITE"

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Henry
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Re: Buffalo, NY (DL&W)
 
« Reply #34 on: Sep 14th, 2005, 1:50pm »
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on Sep 11th, 2005, 11:47am, HwyHaulier wrote:       (Click here for original message)

Thanks for welcoming post! Ref. NKP. Might I conjecture that the known date of close of DL&W -BUF coincided with end of CGO - BUF service over NKP? That thru service must have become quite tenuous post merger. One could see who was in charge: The massive trashing and destruction of perfectly good DL&W rail lines, thus breaking the old, established routings.....

 
Vern,
 
I looked into the issue of when through servive via the NKP died and came up with the following from Ed Montgomery:
Quote:

Here's a little help,
 
I have an EL timetable with the N&W connection but by that time the train had been cut back to Fort  
Wayne.  Apparently N&W had to discontinue service state by state.  There was a picture of the last  
train leaving Fort Wayne in one of the TRAINS magazines of that era.
 
Ed Montgomery

 
And this from Mike Connor (his dad was in management for the Erie and EL, I met him at an ELHS meeting, and Mike works in RRing)
Quote:

I don't have access to NW(K) passenger off lists but EL Form 1 (28  
April 1963) shows a through coach in Train  1-31 from "New York-Chicago, via  
NKP No. 5 (Train 1-31)".  No through Sleeping Cars (NKP had a  
Buffalo-Chicago Sleeper in NKP #5).
  There was a 2nd Edition of the EL Form 1 of 28 April 1963 (no date  
shown) and the New York-Chicago [coach] via NKP #5 is no longer shown.  NKP  
#5 was shown as having a Bflo-Chgo coach and a Bflo-Chgo Sleeping Car.
  The next EL Form 1 was 29 September 1963 so I surmise that the last  
through NKP-EL coach was between c. 1 May 1963 and September 1963.
   The NKP was merged into the N&W 16 October 1964 so there was no  
through NW-EL coach or Sleeping Car service via Buffalo.
Hope this helps.
M J Connor

 
And this from Bill Weibel:
Quote:

The BAGGAGE cars did  not the Pullman cars..at least coming thru Scranton  
EB.

 
Meaning that under N&W baggage cars were still interchanged.
 
Henry


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Henry
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Re: Buffalo, NY (DL&W)
 
« Reply #35 on: Dec 9th, 2005, 1:03pm »
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The remaining trainshed of the Terminal could become some sort of gaming casino thing. Why politicians think that gambling is good for a depressed rust-belt city is beyond me. More tax-free sovereign territory and the City of Buffalo just raised the property taxes on my house in Buffalo 40%. I think it is absolutely ridiculous.
 
Henry
 
http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial/20051209/1009490.asp
 
Senecas undeterred as ground is broken for downtown casino
 
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Next New Year's is aim for debut on 9-acre site in Cobblestone District
 
By SHARON LINSTEDT and MARK SOMMER  
News Staff Reporters
12/9/2005  
 
The Seneca Nation of Indians is moving ahead to develop the Seneca Buffalo Creek Casino on vacant land in downtown Buffalo's Cobblestone District.  
During a groundbreaking ceremony Thursday, Seneca leaders announced they will build their main gambling complex on a nine-acre site along Michigan Avenue, the area they previously said would be a parking lot.  
 
While the Senecas have not set an exact time frame for opening their Buffalo casino, leaders said they want to begin construction this spring and will aim for a debut on New Year's Eve 2006.  
 
They also will continue efforts to acquire the nearby Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad terminal to expand their entertainment operations, as well as more land in the neighborhood for additional parking.  
 
"The nine acres is the main casino site; the DL&W would be an extension of that presence," said Rajat Shah, Seneca Gaming Corp.'s senior vice president for corporate development.  
 
The Senecas are looking at the second floor of the rail facility to develop limited gambling, retail, entertainment and a restaurant, according to Shah.  
 
The Senecas are making no secret of their desire to control more Cobblestone neighborhood property beyond the nine acres that became sovereign territory Dec. 2. Several sources said the Seneca Nation is seeking property for parking adjacent to the casino site.  
 
Unlike the Seneca casino deal in Niagara Falls, where parcels of land were identified in negotiations between the state and the tribe for its gambling operation, there is no specified limit on the amount of land that the tribe can acquire in Buffalo.  
 
However, the Senecas' casino compact with the State of New York says the land the tribe obtains in Buffalo must be limited for "gaming and commercial activities traditionally associated with the operation or conduct of a casino facility."  
 
The compact does not spell out what those activities are. And given the different things the Senecas have sold at their casino in Niagara Falls - from stereos to cigarettes - a Seneca casino in downtown Buffalo could end up being another location for smokers to buy cigarettes tax-free.  
 
At Thursday's groundbreaking, the Senecas also announced they will solicit designs from architects across the country to create a "signature destination."  
 
"We want it to have a distinctive flair," said John Pasqualoni, president and chief executive officer of Seneca Gaming. "We want a world-class facility that fits in with the HSBC Arena and the proposed Bass Pro store."  
 
Mayor Anthony M. Masiello, long a backer of a Buffalo casino, heralded the casino development as a "critical component" of downtown Buffalo's rebirth.  
 
The 100,000-square-foot casino complex will be built to accommodate 2,200 slot machines, 50 gaming tables, a buffet and a fine-dining restaurant. A 2,500-vehicle parking garage and operations facilities are planned for the nine-acre site bounded by Michigan and South Park avenues, and Fulton and Marvin streets.  
 
Leaders and dozens of other members of the Seneca Nation gathered for Thursday's groundbreaking, which served as a homecoming of sorts. Several times during the ceremony, speakers sprinkled their remarks with the Senecas' native language.  
 
Seneca President Barry E. Snyder Sr. recalled that 167 years ago, the Senecas were driven off the Buffalo Creek lands. "This is a truly wonderful homecoming for the Seneca people, and we are here forever," he said.  
 
While several Cobblestone District residents also were on hand, some holding up "Welcome Senecas" signs, they were vastly outnumbered by casino protesters. The chorus included those who oppose gambling, as well as preservationists who want the historic H-O Oats grain elevator on the building site to be saved.  
 
The protesters, many of them holding anti-casino signs, chanted "Shame on You" and "More harm than good" as dignitaries made their congratulatory speeches.  
 
Many were members of Citizens Against Casino Gambling in Erie County, which has announced that it will file lawsuits in federal and state courts to stop the casino. "It's a very sad day for Buffalo," said Bill Durfee, a member of the group. "The notion that the casino is going to be an engine for development is ludicrous. Study after study has shown casinos are a net drain on the economy. Casinos don't rejuvenate neighborhoods or cities."  
 
Tim Tielman of Campaign for Greater Buffalo expressed his dismay as the wrecking ball collided with the 1912 H-O Oats mill for the first time, barely disturbing it.  
 
"It's a disgrace that our elected leadership is standing here cheering on the destruction of a historic structure," Tielman said. "Development can co-exist with historic buildings, but no one is giving it a try here."  
 
Afterward, Snyder said that there would be no final decision on what to do with the H-O silos until an assessment is done.  
 
Snyder said he had no intention of meeting with preservationists. "We're more concerned about the Seneca Nation; that's my position," he said.  
 
Pressed on why he would not meet with them, he answered, "I don't have to."  
 
Mayor-elect Byron W. Brown was more optimistic about working with the Senecas to make sure serious consideration is given to preservation issues.  
 
"The Senecas have not made up their minds yet about how to deal with the H-O Oats elevator, and I would urge them to explore whether it can be incorporated in their plans if that is reasonable and appropriate," Brown said.  
 
 
Tom Precious of The News Albany Bureau contributed to this report.  
 
e-mail: slinstedt@buffnews.com
and msommer@buffnews.com
 
 


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efin98
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Re: Buffalo, NY (DL&W)
 
« Reply #36 on: Dec 28th, 2005, 1:20am »
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The Buffalo Central Terminal not enough for you guys that you want something kept that is not even there anymore God forbid there be more than one decaying ruin left in that city that a very small number of people gawk at...
 
Frankly I don't blame the city for wanting the last vestiges of the terminal torn down in favor of something that actually is of use to the folks who live there.
 
Quote:
There is very little awareness of how the RR's helped build Buffalo. Most people think the Erie Canal built Buffalo, but it was only a minor player after about 1850.

 
Nice smoke and mirrors there.  You are right, AFTER 1850 they were minor players. But BEFORE then they were king. No canal, no city of Buffalo. The railroad didn't build the city, the canal did. Amazing how many of the companies were built on the money generated from those waterways


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Re: Buffalo, NY (DL&W)
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« Reply #37 on: Dec 28th, 2005, 2:34pm »
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on Dec 28th, 2005, 1:20am, efin98 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
The Buffalo Central Terminal not enough for you guys that you want something kept that is not even there anymore God forbid there be more than one decaying ruin left in that city that a very small number of people gawk at...

 
Ed,
 
Nobody is talking about keeping decaying ruins. Preservation and adapative reuse of historic landmarks doesn't mean leaving decaying ruins around.
 
Significant architecture is one of the primary things promoted in Buffalo these days. DL&W Terminal was in a prime downtown location and now it's a freaking yard and carbarn for a next to useless light rail line.
 
Central Terminal is no longer decaying, it is in far better shape today than it was in 1999.  
 
Quote:

Frankly I don't blame the city for wanting the last vestiges of the terminal torn down in favor of something that actually is of use to the folks who live there.

 
Unless you have read something about this which I haven't, I'm unaware of anyone talking about tearing down the last vestiges of the terminal. The articles talk about using the second floor (the Bush trainsheds) as the casino.
 
Quote:

 
Nice smoke and mirrors there.  You are right, AFTER 1850 they were minor players. But BEFORE then they were king. No canal, no city of Buffalo. The railroad didn't build the city, the canal did. Amazing how many of the companies were built on the money generated from those waterways

 
The railroad in conjunction with the lake shipping is what allowed Buffalo to grow into a metropolis. If the Erie Canal  hadn't been built, Buffalo would still have become a city once the railroad was built. It was a logical location for a large grain and coal port operation. Cheap water transport began or ended at Buffalo because of Niagara Falls. This is the major reason the railroads wanted to get there, not because the Erie Canal was there. The Erie canal put Buffalo on the map, but after 1850 it didn't od much to keep it there.
 
Ed, do you deliberately try to piss people off, or is that just the way you always write?
 
Henry


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Re: Buffalo, NY (DL&W)
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« Reply #38 on: Dec 28th, 2005, 2:37pm »
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Here's a closer view of the Bush trainsheds which have been covered with some sort of rubberized roofing to fully enclose the second floor area.
 
Henry


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ClydeDET
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Re: Buffalo, NY (DL&W)
 
« Reply #39 on: Dec 29th, 2005, 10:18am »
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Well, not directly appropos Buffalo - but the old I&GN (Mopac) station in San Antonio was abandoned and decaying. The AMTRAK line to Laredo (was that train the International - can't recall) made its San Antonio stop there while it ran, but the station was not used. You got on or off on the platform and hoped somebody was there to meet you or one of the cab companies had thought to have a few taxis there inc ase of business. I think ticketing was handled at the SP station used by the Sunset and there may have been a shuttle from I&GN to the SP station.
 
That station has been adapted and redeveloped as a financial institution and very nicely too. Anchor for redevelopment of the neighborhood and a good example of what can be done if somebody cares to.  
 
Fort Worth's former Amtrak Station on Jones Street (ex-Santa Fe) on the east side of downtown has been replaced as a station by a new-build Intermodal Center used not only by Amtrak, but also the TRE and Fort Worth T (transit operation - buses right now). The old station has been remodeled and adapted, along with freight-house next to it, to a market. Apaprently well- utilized and the whole deal is helping spiff up that end (east side) or downtown Fort Worth. Now if they can only get something going for the old T&P Station, the skyscraper (for its time) at the south end of downtown FW...
 
Some of the folks up "Nawth" might be able to pick up and idea or two from the Texians.


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