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A 1843 station at London Bridge.
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   Author  Topic: A 1843 station at London Bridge.  (Read 228 times)
toptrain
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A 1843 station at London Bridge.
  londen_bridge_station_dwg._-_Copy_640x465.jpg - 94983 Bytes
« on: Jun 19th, 2016, 9:21am »
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* I know this forum is used for mainly American stations. I am posting this because of the amount and quality of the information I accidently found online. I have a large page of text and a full page drawing of a front view and a floor plain. I only regret that the drawing came out so small. If only this was a standard amount of information found for all stations.  
* The wonder of this text is that, it seems in the first sentence, I am writing it to you today, presenting this well written, extremely polite and proper English wording of a description of this station. I make no claim to the text here for the Editor of this fine book on Engineering and Architecture has done so well with it back in 1843. I am just glade that I found it, and now share it with you. This is just a sample of what can be found on-line at Google and other E-Book Library's.
* Enjoy the read!
 
 frank
 
*       "The Civil Engineer and Architect's Journal."
                
*         No. 75.—VOL. VI. 1843. -------Page 403
  
 
THE NEW TERMINUS OF THE BRIGHTON, CROYDON, DOVER, AND GREENWICH  RAILWAYS,  AT LONDON BRIDGE.
 
* WE have at length the pleasure of presenting to our readers some
particulars of the New Joint Railway Terminus at London Bridge,
the extensive works of which have been in progress during the last
18 months, and are now all but completed, so far as respects the por
tion to be executed by the Brighton, Croydon, and Dover Companies;
and our remarks are accompanied by a view of the entire facade, as
it will appear when the Greenwich Company’s portion of the building
shall have been completed, together with a ground plan.
* From the time of the passing of the Acts of Parliament for the
construction of the Brighton and Dover lines of railway, it became
evident to the Directors and Engineers of those undertakings, that the
Croydon terminus at London Bridge would be found not only totally
inadequate to the carrying on of the united trafiic of these lines of
railway, but that its position to the north of the Greenwich station
was inadmissible, involving as it did the inconvenience and danger of
crossing the Greenwich line of railway at the departure and arrival of
every train; and in due time arrangements were accordingly entered
into with the Greenwich Company, by which the original Croydon
station was made over to them in exchange for the original Greenwich
station, together with an extent of new works on the south side
thereof of equal area; by this arrangement, combined with the
widening out of the Greenwich viaduct from the Croydon junction
to the terminus, from which point four lines of rails are now pro
vided, the Greenwich traffic is kept entirely distinct, and to the
northward of that of the Brighton, Croydon, and Dover lines: while
by a happy agreement between the. four different companies, assented
to on the part of the Greenwich company, by the advice of their
talented architect George Smith, Esq., a complete unity of design
has been preserved in the entire facade, as seen from the approach
from Duke Street.
* The whole extent of surface now occupied by the joint station, is
l30,000 square feet, or about three acres. And when it is consi
dered that the whole of this extensive surface has of necessity been
raised by massive piers and arches to an average height of about
23 feet above the natural surface of the ground, some idea may be
formed of the magnitude and cost of these works, in which, exclusive
of the old Croydon and Greenwich terminus, above 8,000,000 of bricks
have been consumed.
* On entering the station the spacious and elegant iron roofs attract
notice; the surface covered in by this means includes an area of
48,000 square feet, or upwards of an acre, atfording ample scope for
housing and cleaning the numerous carriages of the different compa
nies, and securing from the weather the spacious arrival and depar
ture platforms, and the space to the south appropriated to carriages
waiting the arrival of trains.
* These roofs are supported by three rows of cast iron fluted columns,
of elegant design, connected together above their capitals by orna
mented arched ribs, which carry the trusses of the roof; the rain
water is received into cast iron gutters communicating with the
columns, which being cast hollow, convey away the water to the pipes
and drains of the substructure. In the construction of these roofs,
Mr. Rastrick has observed the same peculiarity of form in the struts
as be employed at the roofs of the terminus at Brighton, but in this
case, instead of being of wrought iron tubing, they are of cast iron,
hollow, and tinted to harmonise with the tinting of the columns, and
the nuts at the end of the lting and queen rods are concealed by or
namental foliated pendants. The whole area is well lighted by sky
lights on either side of the ridge, running nearly the whole length
0f the roofs, and numerous others in appropriate situations.
* The arrival and departure platforms, each 21 feet in width, are fine
specimens of Bangor slate paving, in slabs, averaging 6 feet 6 inches
by 4 feet each. On the arrival platform is a travelling luggage en
closure, deserving of notice, as being well adapted to its purpose, and
less unsightly than such contrlvances usually are.
* To avoid confusion, a back entrance to the station has been pro
vided by means of an inclined plane, commencing at the south end of
Joiner’s Street, by which cabs and omnibusses are allowed to enter
and wait the arrival of trains, by which means the inconvenience of
the confined space in front of the principal entrance is very much
lessened.
* The goods warehouse stands on the east side of Dean Street, com
municating by a bridge with the spare carriage house on the west.
The cranes for hoisting and lowering are worked on the pneumatic
principle, by a small steam engine placed under the tank, which sup
plies the station with water.
* On referring to our engraving, it will be seen that the advanced
portion of the facade consists of a centre, in which are three door
ways, and two wings with a doorway in each ; that in the right wing
is the first class passengers’ entrance to the booking offices; the right
hand door of the centre is the second class entrance, and the centre
doorway is the way for luggage; and the remaining doorways are the
first and second class entrances to the Greenwich company’s offices.
Receding from the principal front on the right is the campanile rising
to a height of 97 feet from the level of Tooley Street to the summit
of the vane, and exhibiting an illuminated clock for regulating the
times of the arrival and departure of trains.
* Still further removed from the line of the principal front are the
ofiices for the arrival and departure of parcels, (forming the extreme
wings of the facade,) united by alofty archway, which serves as an
entrance for gentleman's carriages departing by the trains. The in
terior of the building contains on the ground-floor the general booking
office 53 feet by 21 feet, with separate entrances, passages. and
waiting rooms, for first and second class passengers, so arranged, that
the two classes are kept distinct, until they arrive at the platform, to
effect which Objects, the arrangements seem well adapted. On the
one-pair floor, to which we ascend by a stone staircase in the tower,
there is a large room for the public meetings of the companies, and
three others for the use of the joint station committee, secretary, &c.,
besides the apartments of the housekeeper; a secondary staircase
from this part of the building leads to the clock room, in the upper
floor of the tower, and above this to the lead flat, at the level of the
principal cornice, from which, between the arches of the upper part,
an extensive view of the metropolis and its southern suburbs is                
obtained.
* To carry out their object, the committee availed themselves of the
professional services of J. N. Rastrick, Esq., and W. Cubitt, Esq., as
their joint engineers, to the judicious counsel of whom they are
mainly indebted for the amount of accommodation secured in so  
confined and difficult a situation.
* In the architectural department, Mr. Henry Roberts has been gene
rally consulted, the designs being prepared, and the works more im
mediately superintended by Mr. Thomas Turner, the resident archi
tect and engineer; and we deem it due to the taste and talent of the
latter gentleman to state that we are indebted to him for the elegant
Italian composition represented in our engraving.
* We remember, that in the competition for the new Infant Orphan
Asylum, the second premium was awarded to Mr. Turner, and we
think his present effort entitles him to be considered as one of the
rising architects of the day.
 
No. 75.—VOL. VI. 1843.
 
 


http://Forums.Railfan.net/Images/Stations/londen_bridge_station_dwg._-_Copy_640x465.jpg
Click Image to Resize

« Last Edit: Jun 19th, 2016, 11:23am by toptrain » Logged

toptrain
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toptrain
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Re:  A 1843 station at London Bridge.
 
« Reply #1 on: Jun 19th, 2016, 11:41am »
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A Apology from me.
 
* It would seem by the number of reads that I have annoyed a few people trying to read this posting. I am sorry for all the editing I have done continuously at the time of posting. Every time I read my forward to this article, it was lacking in composition. I guess that at 70 years old I feel a need to do things done right away. Even now things are still wrong.(edit 3-9-2017 insert the word "do".) One of the most oblivious is that in the article's original text made to fit a certain size column, the split words that were hyphenated to show a spit word were all eliminated when transferred from book to post. Many are still missing. Please don't be too hard on me for it took a lot of work just to get to here.
 
 frank


« Last Edit: Mar 9th, 2017, 7:32am by toptrain » Logged

toptrain
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George_Harris
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Re:  A 1843 station at London Bridge.
 
« Reply #2 on: Jun 20th, 2016, 1:53am »
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Frank:  I don't see that you have anything to apologise to anybody about.  We do have a few self appointed policemen and English professors here, by that I mean those that get in an uproar about trespassing, etc. on the one hand find grammar and spelling errors on the other.  With your guidance I fished around and found the article, copied and got rid of all the line breaks.  Here it is:  
 
p. 403  
No. 75.— Vol. VI.— December, 1843.  
 
THE NEW TERMINUS OF THE BRIGHTON, CROYDON, DOVER, AND GREENWICH RAILWAYS AT LONDON BRIDGE.  
 
(With an Engraving, Plate XV.)  
 
We have at length the pleasure of presenting to our readers some particulars of the New Joint Railway Terminus at London Bridge, the extensive works of which have been in progress during the last 18 months, and are now all but completed, so far as respects the portion to be executed by the Brighton, Croydon, and Dover Companies; and our remarks are accompanied by a view of the entire facade, as it will appear when the Greenwich Company’s portion of the building shall have been completed, together with a ground plan.  
 
From the time of the passing of the Acts of Parliament for the construction of the Brighton and Dover lines of railway, it became evident to the Directors and Engineers of those undertakings, that the Croydon terminus at London Bridge would be found not only totally inadequate to the carrying on of the united traffic of these lines of railway, but that its position to the north of the Greenwich station was inadmissible, involving as it did the inconvenience and danger of crossing the Greenwich line of railway at the departure and arrival of every train; and in due time arrangements were accordingly entered into with the Greenwich Company, by which the original Croydon station was made over to them in exchange for the original Greenwich station, together with an extent of new works on the south side thereof of equal area; by this arrangement, combined with the widening out of the Greenwich viaduct from the Croydon junction to the terminus, from which point four lines of rails are now provided, the Greenwich traffic is kept entirely distinct, and to the northward of that of the Brighton, Croydon, and Dover lines: while by a happy agreement between the four different companies, assented to on the part of the Greenwich company, by the advice of their talented architect George Smith, Esq., a complete unity of design has been preserved in the entire facade, as seen from the approach from Duke Street.  
 
The whole extent of surface now occupied by the joint station, is 130,000 square feet, or about three acres. And when it is considered that the whole of this extensive surface has of necessity been raised by massive piers and arches to an average height of about 23 feet above the natural surface of the ground, some idea may be formed of the magnitude and cost of these works, in which, exclusive of the old Croydon and Greenwich terminus, above 8,000,000 of bricks have been consumed.  
 
On entering the station the spacious and elegant iron roofs attract notice; the surface covered in by this means includes an area of 48,000 square feet, or upwards of an acre, affording ample scope for housing and cleaning the numerous carriages of the different companies, and securing from the weather the spacious arrival and departure platforms, and the space to the south appropriated to carriages awaiting the arrival of trains.  
 
These roofs are supported by three rows of cast iron fluted columns, of elegant design, connected together above their capitals by ornamented arched ribs, which carry the trusses of the roof; the rainwater is received into cast iron gutters communicating with the columns, which being cast hollow, convey away the water to the pipes and drains of the substructure. In the construction of these roofs, Mr. Rastrick has observed the same peculiarity of form in the struts as he employed at the roofs of the terminus at Brighton, but in this case, instead of being of wrought iron tubing, they are of cast iron, hollow, and fluted to harmonise with the fluting of the columns, and the nuts at the end of the king and queen rods are concealed by ornamental foliated pendants. The whole area is well lighted by skylights on either side of the ridge, running nearly the whole length of the roofs, and numerous others in appropriate situations.  
 
The arrival and departure platforms, each 21 feet in width, are fine specimens of Bangor slate paving, in slabs, averaging 6 feet 6 inches by 4 feet each. On the arrival platform is a travelling luggage enclosure, deserving of notice, as being well adapted to its purpose, and less unsightly than such contrivances usually are.  
 
To avoid confusion, a back entrance to the station has been provided by means of an inclined plane, commencing at the south end of Joiner’s Street, by which cabs and omnibusses are allowed to enter and wait the arrival of trains, by which means the inconvenience of the confined space in front of the principal entrance is very much lessened.  
 
The goods warehouse stands on the east side of Dean Street, communicating by a bridge with the spare carriage house on the west. The cranes for hoisting and lowering are worked on the pneumatic principle, by a small steam engine placed under the tank, which supplies the station with water.  
 
On referring to our engraving, it will be seen that the advanced portion of the facade consists of a centre, in which are three doorways, and two wings with a doorway in each; that in the right wing is the first class passengers’ entrance to the booking offices; the right hand door of the centre is the second class entrance, and the centre doorway is the way for luggage; and the remaining doorways are the first and second class entrances to the Greenwich company’s offices. Receding from the principal front on the right is the campanile rising to a height of 97 feet from the level of Tooley Street to the summit of the vane, and exhibiting an illuminated clock for regulating the times of the arrival and departure of trains.  
 
Still further removed from the line of the principal front are the offices for the arrival and departure of parcels, (forming the extreme wings of the facade,) united by a lofty archway, which serves as an entrance for gentlemen’s carriages departing by the trains. The interior of the building contains on the ground-floor the general booking office 53 feet by 21 feet, with separate entrances, passages, and waiting rooms, for first and second class passengers, so arranged, that the two classes are kept distinct, until they arrive at the platform, to effect which objects, the arrangements seem well adapted. On the one-pair floor, to which we ascend by a stone staircase in the tower, there is a large room for the public meetings of the companies, and three others for the use of the joint station committee, secretary, &c, besides the apartments of the housekeeper; a secondary staircase from this part of the building leads to the clock room, in the upper floor of the tower, and above this to the lead flat, at the level of the principal cornice, from which, between the arches of the upper part, an extensive view of the metropolis and its southern suburbs is obtained.  
 
To carry out their object, the committee availed themselves of the professional services of J. N. Rastrick, Esq., and W. Cubitt, Esq., as their joint engineers, to the judicious counsel of whom they are mainly indebted for the amount of accommodation secured in so confined and difficult a situation.  
 
In the architectural department, Mr. Henry Roberts has been generally consulted, the designs being prepared, and the works more immediately superintended by Mr. Thomas Turner, the resident architect and engineer; and we deem it due to the taste and talent of the latter gentleman to state that we are indebted to him for the elegant Italian composition represented in our engraving.  
 
We remember, that in the competition for the new Infant Orphan Asylum, the second premium was awarded to Mr. Turner, and we think his present effort entitles him to be considered as one of the rising architects of the day.  
 
 
 (For those that want to see it in the original as a pdf, go to https://ia802608.us.archive.org/30/items/civilengineerarc06lond/civilengineerarc06lond.pdf
 
or as txt, https://archive.org/stream/civilengineerarc06lond/civilengineerarc06lond_djvu.txt
Which by the way you can copy-paste, but much watch out for occasional miscopies.


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toptrain
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Re:  A 1843 station at London Bridge.
  londen_bridge_station_dwg._-_2.jpg - 161681 Bytes
« Reply #3 on: Jun 20th, 2016, 10:14am »
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 Hi George.  
   Thanks for the redo of the text. Me and my computer have to struggle with each other to get something done, all the time. You have made it a easy read. I really like to read these well written descriptions of station architecture. If you are a Londoner, does that station still exist or was it replaced with another? I like in the description the line where it says over eight million bricks were consumed by it. This depot must have quite a appetite.
frank
 
Below is a larger copy of the station drawing so it can be viewed better.



Image exceeds display size of 900 pixels wide. (1086x789, 161681 bytes)

Click Here to View Image londen_bridge_station_dwg._-_2.jpg - 161681 Bytes


« Last Edit: Mar 9th, 2017, 8:09am by toptrain » Logged

toptrain
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Henry
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Re:  A 1843 station at London Bridge.
 
« Reply #4 on: Jun 20th, 2016, 10:45am »
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Looks like a beautiful station and that's a lot of bricks!


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George_Harris
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Re:  A 1843 station at London Bridge.
 
« Reply #5 on: Jun 20th, 2016, 10:17pm »
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on Jun 20th, 2016, 10:14am, toptrain wrote:       (Click here for original message)
 Hi George.  
   Thanks for the redo of the text. Me and my computer have to struggle with each other to get something done, all the time. You have made it a east read. I really like to read these well written descriptions of station architecture. If you are a Londoner, does that station still exist or was it replaced with another? I like in the description the line where it says over eight million bricks were consumed by it. This depot must have quite a appetite.
frank.

Not a Londoner.  Home is just out of Memphis TN.  Haven't gotten as far in the London direction as London, Ontario.  Have been west a little ways, as far as Singapore.  Oh, forgot about Sydney NSW, but that was quite a few years earlier.


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toptrain
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Re:  A 1843 station at London Bridge.
  london_bridge_station_s.jpg - 198707 Bytes
« Reply #6 on: Jun 22nd, 2016, 6:57am »
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George thanks again for the post, and I hope you liked the book.
 frank
 
 Here is a public domain view of the 1844 station from Wikipedia.
 


http://Forums.Railfan.net/Images/Stations/london_bridge_station_s.jpg
Click Image to Resize

« Last Edit: Jul 3rd, 2016, 10:21am by toptrain » Logged

toptrain
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ClydeDET
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Re:  A 1843 station at London Bridge.
 
« Reply #7 on: Jun 27th, 2016, 9:44pm »
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Well, I was an English major and was once a lawyer. I see no problem with anything toptrain had to say, nor how he said it.
 
I was also unaware that this forum was primarily for American stations and works - rue, MOST of what we see is stuff from the USA, but I think that is because it is a site located in the USA.
 
So - I say very interesting account of the terminal. Thanks for putting it up.


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Les_Shepherd
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Re:  A 1843 station at London Bridge.
 
« Reply #8 on: Jun 28th, 2016, 3:04am »
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I would hardly call London Bridge one of my favourite stations in London but it is one that has always interested me for several reasons. I passed through the station every day when I was working in London in 1990. It is the only terminal station in London with both terminal platforms and platforms for through working of surface trains.
 
The first station was built in 1836 by the London & Greenwich Railway. They proceeded to collect tolls from the 2 companies which followed and sought to use the station. These were the London & Croydon Railway and the London, Brighton & South Coast Railway (LBSCR). This caused much disagreement between the companies for many decades. Congestion etc., at the 1836 station saw a new station built in 1842-1844. It was not until 1844 that the railway lines reached Dover.
 
As traffic increased it became necessary for the South Eastern Railway(SER)  to extend its lines across the Thames to the edge of the City. This entailed constructing high level platforms on brick & steel arches then above the streets to bridges across the river to Charing Cross and Cannon street. This work occurred during the 1850's.
 
Over the decades many alterations were made. The station suffered severe damage during the second world war. The most alarming was in 1940 when a parachute bomb became entangled in a signal girder with the bomb resting against the signal cabin. The signalmen continued working while the bomb was defused. To allow business to continue temporary facilities were provided to replaced damaged areas. These remained in placed well into the 1970's. The remains of the 1843 frontage were demolished in 1966.
 
Major upgrading and reconstruction occurred in the 1970's. The whole facility remained cramped and crowded with the limited space in heavy demand by passengers.
 
For the past 2 years a major reconstruction has been underway. This not only includes the buildings and platforms but also the track layouts and signalling. The work is continuing at he moment and has involved serious delays and re-routing of many services.
 
I will stand correction on this but there are 11 lines entering the station, 4 of these continue to Charing Cross and Cannon Street. I am unaware of how this will change with the present reconstruction work. There are also underground stations for 2 tube lines, the City branch of the Northern Line and the Jubilee Line.


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Re:  A 1843 station at London Bridge.
 
« Reply #9 on: Jun 30th, 2016, 9:28pm »
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That is very interesting, Les. I always find the number of roads and stations in London interesting. Closest I can think of in the US would be pre-AMTRAK Chicago.

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toptrain
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Re:  A 1843 station at London Bridge.
 
« Reply #10 on: Jul 1st, 2016, 8:14am »
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* I am just sitting back enjoying the conversation between Henry, George, Clyde and Les and really liking it. Up to now all I can say is WOW! I wish I had more to share. That update by Les give added interest for the future of this interesting depot. I have 2 other English books on stations terminals and depots. Maybe there will be additional tidbits of interesting info to share on this London train station.
 Frank


« Last Edit: Jul 1st, 2016, 10:35am by toptrain » Logged

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Re:  A 1843 station at London Bridge.
  Davidson_poem_b.jpg - 207839 Bytes
« Reply #11 on: Jul 1st, 2016, 8:57am »
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Well Les, it seems that back in the Victorian age travellers didn't like London Bridge Station either. A Poem By John Davison. Here he criticizes this inadequate station.
 frank


http://Forums.Railfan.net/Images/Stations/Davidson_poem_b.jpg
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toptrain
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Re:  A 1843 station at London Bridge.
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« Reply #12 on: Jul 1st, 2016, 10:20am »
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*** More about the London Station;
* In the book "Railway Architecture" by Binney and Pearce, this station is mentioned on page 28-29. My information at the start of this post is of the station after it was extended in 1843-44. The original station opened on December 14 1836, and was designed by George Smith. The latter 1844 extension was designed by Henry Roberts. The station was built for the first steam railway in London by the "London and Greenwich Railway". The Railway to Greenwich when opened in 1836 was almost entirely built upon raised stone arches. I guess that makes it the first elevated railroad ever constructed. In another book "The Railway Station" by Richards and Mackenzie, The open areas of the arches where feasible were leased for stores, and other purposes.  A high Level station was added 1864 on a extension to Waterloo and Charing Crossing. Latter additions started in 1850-51 by Samuel Beazley was not completed until 1866 when the barrel vaulted train shed was finished and opened. A present time description at time of publishing 1979 is " A profoundly Complicated, muddled, and architecturally undistinguished assembly of buildings that sit cheek to jowl with Southwark Cathedral". I don't think this is a very nice description that is favorable to this station. Also stated in 1979 was a major redevelopment of the Station planed to tidy up the mess. I guess that means that they started thinking about what to do, but didn't do anything till a few years ago as Les tells us. Things like that most likely happen around here also.
frank
 
edit; Here is a public domain view from Wikipedia showing the viaduct, The line was 3 3/4 miles long. The viaduct was made up of 851 semi-circular arches . I bont know if it included the new branch line .


http://Forums.Railfan.net/Images/Stations/London_bridge_and_viaduct_s.jpg
Click Image to Resize

« Last Edit: Jul 3rd, 2016, 10:27am by toptrain » Logged

toptrain
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Les_Shepherd
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Re:  A 1843 station at London Bridge.
 
« Reply #13 on: Jul 3rd, 2016, 1:49am »
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Frank, you are correct that the Greenwich Railway was built on arches. They are brick arches and they continue in use today. We can only guess as to why it was necessary to construct the arches.
 
With the extensions to Charing Cross and Cannon Street the lines needed to be carried above the streets of Southwark. The station was built 23ft above ground level so this was not a great problem. A separate company was formed to carry out the work for the South Eastern Railway. The lines (4 tracks) skirt the edge of Southwark Cathedral. They also crossed a small portion of the grounds of St Thomas's Hospital. Using powers in the enabling laws the Hospital Trustees demanded that the entire hospital and grounds be purchased and demanded payment equal to 90% of the company's capital. Arbitration brought a more equitable result including the substantial funding of the new Albert Embankment Hospital.
 
The only intermediate station on the extensions is at Waterloo East where there is a ramp across to the concourse of Waterloo Station. A single line connection was built from the platforms at Waterloo, across the concourse and joined the Charing Cross-London Bridge line. The connection was auspiciously used by Queen Victoria on her trips to Europe. I believe that the connection was removed when Waterloo Station was rebuilt early in the 20th century.


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Re:  A 1843 station at London Bridge.
  London-Greenwich_viaduct.jpg - 240016 Bytes
« Reply #14 on: Jul 3rd, 2016, 10:30am »
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Here is another view from Wikipedia that is listed there as Public domain.
It is a clearer view showing the brick work of the viaduct.
 frank.  
 
Discription;  Viaduct by Bermondsay Church.


http://Forums.Railfan.net/Images/Stations/London-Greenwich_viaduct.jpg
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« Last Edit: Jul 3rd, 2016, 10:45am by toptrain » Logged

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Re:  A 1843 station at London Bridge.
 
« Reply #15 on: Jul 3rd, 2016, 10:56am »
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Here is a you tube video of the station now.
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w2GM-0N1ZMc
 
2nd better link
 
3D virtual tour of London Bridge Station to me from catfordken, a Londoner.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2JxQb-80VY


« Last Edit: Jul 13th, 2016, 4:55pm by toptrain » Logged

toptrain
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Re:  A 1843 station at London Bridge.
 
« Reply #16 on: Mar 9th, 2017, 8:20am »
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***  Has anyone looked at the video of the new station yet in the previous post. It is really something to see.  
 frank


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Re:  A 1843 station at London Bridge.
 
« Reply #17 on: Mar 9th, 2017, 1:00pm »
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The 3D Virtual Tour was interesting. I wish I had taken the time to stop there 25 years ago with my dad. We got to most of the other major stations in the area. We took trains out of Paddington, Euston and Waterloo and saw most of the Underground stations. We also visited the Underground Museum, which was very interesting. The week after I was in Waterloo Station it was bombed. We saw the Queen's Train at Euston when we departed for Glasgow in the very early AM, but I was so thoroughly potted from our pub crawl that night that I don't remember much other than it was black with gold trim!


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Re:  A 1843 station at London Bridge.
 
« Reply #18 on: Jun 8th, 2017, 8:17am »
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** Great memories Henry. Thanks for sharing. Frank

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