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Topic Summary
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Feb 27th, 2013, 10:08pm
Having dealt with the ruined sheetrock in my layout (basement) room and having to remove nearly my entire layout to get to the sheetrock, at last I have reached a point where I can start over... only this time i'm going to avoid the mistakes i made the last time... and make new ones instead...
 
to begin.  The hidden staging yard: this time i have made enough room to add a loop track 28" radius that's enough to handle 86' LaBelle passenger cars.  
 
To reach the hidden yard's central operating pit I'm not crawling...  I'm 60 and am done with ducking and crawling... i have a secretary's chair and i "roll under," instead of ducking.  
 
Hidden yard track is code 100 Atlas with Atlas Custom Line no 6 turnouts.  
A note:  I'm modeling the period between 1880 and 1910.  
most freight trains (on this railroad)are 6-9 cars long, the longest trains will be about 12 cars in length
passenger trains are either 1 or 2 cars (a combine or a baggage and coach.)  special trains like "The BOAT TRAIN"  and the "WESTERN EXPRESS" might get up to 4 cars (RPO/baggage, combine, two coaches)
this means that (on this railroad) trains are about 5 feet in actual length
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Feb 27th, 2013, 10:26pm
The "other" side of the backdrop.  the turnout at right goes under the backdrop appearing on the other side as a spur into J C Tucker Company's COAL LUMBER GRAIN yard.
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Feb 27th, 2013, 10:38pm
first new building  
PHOECH'S FISHNETS
they make ladies stockings i guess
I'll have to make a sign
its a waterfront building, will be partially on a dock
 
a note:
i have been in model railroading since the 1950s, i have worshipped at the altar of the false gods of animation and excess detailing and hopefully learned a lesson.
 
i build models to a level of "adequate detailing" and may later add additional details but this is model railroad and not an outsized still life or contest model.
 
i hope this will encourage others to post more photos and descriptions of their projects.
 
thanks for looking
 
ring the cowbell
 
steve
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Feb 27th, 2013, 10:55pm
another view, taken while i was doing detail painting, both roof and floor are removable
 
the roof is clapboard that i have shinglized
Posted by: toptrain Posted on: Feb 28th, 2013, 5:08pm
Steve, the layout is HO ? Those old kit passenger cars are interesting. This layout will be replaced. Also there is another section where the oar cars are going. Last the buildings look more G gaaue than HO.
 frank
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Feb 28th, 2013, 7:33pm
Yes the layout is HO, although i sometimes will build something in O or On2 or HOn2 1/2.
 
I have a number of cars built from Ambroid, Binkley, central valley Labelle and other kits as well as some scratch
 
I like building things from wood although i have used sheet styrene at times, its just not the same thing.  
 
I'm putting this in scratchbuilding rather than HO scale, cuz most of this is going to be on building stuff,  
 
and yes i salvaged almost everything from the Carolina Mills "blob" and i hope to get the mainline there again some day.
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Feb 28th, 2013, 9:01pm
still working at the waterfront
The fishing docks are a complex of five buildings mostly built on the dock (and another three backing right up to them.)
 
Left to right  Thatcher's Inlet and Thatcher's Outlet (the annex) I thought they specialized in wall plugs (outlets) but found out otherwise and so will you.  
 
Next door butting up against the Inlet is  
Salty's Brine (the two shingled buildings)  
 
and then Phoech's Fishnets apparently a supplier of ladies apparell  
 
This is Thatcher's.  The Main building (Inlet) roof is removable, the whole building can be removed to service...
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Feb 28th, 2013, 9:11pm
the other side of Thatcher's.  
 
Salty's butts up against the tall blank wall.
 
note the slot under the door of the Outlet building keep an eye on it
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Feb 28th, 2013, 9:28pm
Thatcher's doesn't make electrical outlets, they cover up switch machines
 
Yes, i still use my 30 year old Kemtron twin coil machines.  A brass tube hot glued then imbedded in the scenery carries the brass throwrod from the machine to the throwbar.
 
BTW I work on a real railroad and when i throw a switch (by hand) i put all 200 lbs of my lard ass into it and by Gawd there's a good healthy snap involved, or you won't get the points closed.
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Feb 28th, 2013, 9:46pm
Salty's Brine (Rhode Islanders will get the inside joke on that one)  
 
I'm still working on the dormers.  Left side of Salty's butts against the tall blank wall of Thatcher's
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Feb 28th, 2013, 9:50pm
another view of Salty's.
Posted by: TAB Posted on: Mar 2nd, 2013, 12:20pm
Hi Steve....It's great to see you back at layout construction once again and posting your scratch building efforts here. Carving into clapboard siding to simulate wood shingles is a great idea which produces a very effective result....Tom
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 2nd, 2013, 2:07pm
thanks for the kind words.
it has been a long and difficult time.
 
i stole the idea of converting clapboard into shingles from Peter Barney, an On2 scale modeler.  Since a lot of us have basement layouts where humidity can warp cardboard i thought it had merit, even if it can be tedious at times.
 
This is a pre reconstruction plan for the current section, I call it Narragansett Pier,RI although it has features stolen from Wickford, Gallilee, and Newport RI as well as Fall River and New Bedford, MA.  
 
the section from the angle in the seawall (L) to the Rocky outcropping at the end of Ocean Drive is salvaged from the previous layout (Carolina II)essentially intact.
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 2nd, 2013, 2:27pm
A view of the fishing dock with Thatcher's at the left, Salty's in the middle and Phoech's at the right.  The steamboat Pier is at Far Side right.  the dock  is hot glued to a structural member behind the sea wall and (obviously) that's a cardboard mock up of sloop de jour.  
 
i guess i'd better do something quick, that cardboard box can't hold up a dock forever!
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 2nd, 2013, 2:38pm
to the rescue, the Sturdy Bilt Dock Company has sent George (the pile driver) and Gracie (the crane barge) to get to work on that dock.  
 
George and Gracie were scratch built in 1997.  
 
A long LONG time ago I worked on a pile driver.  (That's me halfway up the tower, trust me, that's one place you do not want to be!)  
 
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 2nd, 2013, 3:07pm
another quick peek at George and Gracie.
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 6th, 2013, 10:26pm
here is a view of the harbor area.  one major structure missing (coal unloader and grain elevator) the schooner is not a freighter, but if i don't tell anyone they won't know...
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 6th, 2013, 10:55pm
a closer look
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 9th, 2013, 10:52am
One more view.  the grey base (left of the station)  is the base for the dominating grain elevator... the next project...  
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 9th, 2013, 4:23pm
There once was a grain elevator/coal unloader at Narragansett Pier.  I have no idea of what it looked like except that it was once upon a time voted the most unsightly structure on Narragansett Bay.  
 
so some fool will now send me a photo.  
 
In the mean time i have built a elevator/unloader sort of based on a photo of one which was located near Syracuse New York, on the Erie Canal and New York Central RR.  
 
2 construction views
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 9th, 2013, 4:27pm
the other side,  
 
construction view
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 9th, 2013, 11:44pm
test fitting for appearance
 
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 10th, 2013, 5:19pm
its got legs  1 of 2
 
the elevator stands 14 1/2 inches tall
 
i'd say that dominates the waterfront
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 10th, 2013, 5:29pm
i guess you could say this is the "dominating structure" of the waterfront district, even when viewed through the masts of the schooner.
 
i haven't painted the legs or trim yet
 
a couple of notes, i will be doing some heavy weather, and i intended this to appear as a heavily used industrial structure.  toward that end i used some fuzzy lumber here, a warped stick there  
 
look closely, find Mr Tucker (in the top hat) admiring his new elevator.
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 10th, 2013, 6:36pm
the harbor from Hazard's dock to Stillman & Morgan Ship's Chandlery
Posted by: TAB Posted on: Mar 11th, 2013, 5:22pm
.....I like the lines of that grain elevator. It's an interesting model....Tom
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 15th, 2013, 6:44pm
the out back, chute to the coal bunker
and the blower sends grain up the elevator
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 15th, 2013, 9:28pm
and the front side, 2 views.  
 
in theory how does this 'elevator, coal loader' work
 
well, from the 1860s into the early 20th century the cheapest way to move cargo from one place to another was by boat.  Even when the railroads appeared it was still 1/6th the cost per ton to move by water.  So if you were on the waterfront, a river or even a canal and time was not a factor you would "ship" by water.  as late as 1915 it was still faster and cheaper to move coal in bulk from Newport News, VA to Belfast, Me.  
 
at the same time grain flowed out of the inland regions to the coast for trans shipment to Europe.  Grain from the midwest came east by rail and canal mostly to New York City, while New England grain wound its way to small ports where schooners would pick it up for delivery to the Metropolis.  
 
Ok, so grain comes in a few cars at a time is unloaded into the trackside pit and is blown up into the elevator for storage.  a single train car of the period could hold between 10 and 15 tons, a typical (small) schooner could hold 250 tons.  
 
The schooner arrives with a hold full of coal and a deckload of merchandise or what ever freight could be found headed the right way.  Once the deck load is unloaded the hold is thrown open and large baskets are filled with shovels.  A cable is rigged from the topmasts of the schooner to the frame on top of the elevator.  
A double block is rigged on the cable.  when the baskets are full they are raised up to the masthead and as the cable is further drawn in the block and basket slides up the cable to  platform under the head frame.  The baskets are tipped up and the coal dumps out and slides down the chute to the large bunker behind the unloader.  
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 15th, 2013, 9:33pm
When the coal has been unloaded the rigging is struck and the cargo hold is lined with (clean?) canvas and grain is blown into the hold.  Once full the schooner would take on whatever cargo was available as a deckload.  In New England it was usually rough lumber.
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 16th, 2013, 8:39pm
moving next door the other big part of the Harbor is the steamship pier.  There once was a pier at Narragansett Pier.  it didn't look like this.  This looks more like something that belongs in Fall River or the East River.  However, this is "the pier."  It is the third rebuilding of "The Pier."  It has been on 4 layouts so far.  
 
In my world, steamboats stop here on their way between New York City, Fall River, Newport, Providence.  
 
The equipment for the "Boat Train" is spotted on the pier.  
for those who are interested the cars are Binkleys.  
 
 
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 16th, 2013, 8:45pm
with the head house on the pier
 
note the track goes further into the head house than it should.  
the head house was built from Northeastern scribed sheets with Grandt Windows.
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 16th, 2013, 8:51pm
although the head house is not a new structure, i completely disassembled it (the old Ambriod glue was cracking apart after 30 years) which gave an opportunity to improve interior bracing.  it also got a new roof.
 
as you can see here the building is not rectangular
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 19th, 2013, 8:43pm
next along the coast is Stillman Morgan and Company Ship's Chandlery.  i built this quite a while ago, it is unusal for me at least as the building is styrene.  this was inspired by a trip to Mystic Ct and some photos.      
the less than expert weathering job was an accident
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 19th, 2013, 9:12pm
another look
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 23rd, 2013, 2:54pm
no waterfront is complete without a whole bunch of fishing shacks. Here are are some of mine, mostly built out of scrapbox wood.  1 of 3.  I haven't found my box of sea gulls yet but i'm looking... oh , wait just a minute!
this isn't ocean front, this is Narragansett Bay, so they aren't sea gulls after all, They're bay gulls.
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 23rd, 2013, 3:02pm
More waterfront sheds and shacks.  The large white building covers a switch machine.
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 23rd, 2013, 3:12pm
and of course we got to have a few old boxcar sheds.  the HP&F will be hardly readable once the weather gets to it
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 30th, 2013, 10:45pm
not really scratchbuilding, but this is how we used to make rocky outcroppings in the days before rubber molds became popular...
 
wad up paper and make the basic profile...
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 30th, 2013, 11:49pm
I took a piece of aluminum foil and crinkled it into a ball, then flattened it out.  i mixed up my favorite soup of rocky's rock hard water putty,  its harder and stronger than plaster.  some i spread on the wadded paper, the rest i spread in the aluminum foil, then waited a few minutes so it wasn't quite as soupy...
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 31st, 2013, 8:02pm
no rubber molds here
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 31st, 2013, 9:01pm
and strip off the aluminium foil,
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Mar 31st, 2013, 9:27pm
add some colour before ground cover
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Apr 8th, 2013, 8:20am
In the real village of Narragansett Pier,  Moving along the wooden seawall from the fishing dock we follow Ocean Drive which ran from South Pier (where the station was located) to the casino, and the road was lined with a series of rambling hotels.  I haven't got the room for even one of the hotels, so I'll just have to make do with some houses.
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Apr 8th, 2013, 8:26am
A second view.  This is a slightly modified Campbell kit, built almost 20 years ago by Kim Greenawalt (Perry Kline).  Kim's husband, Professor emeritus Maury Klien, is the author of a monumental 3 volume history of the Union Pacific, and Pulitzer nominated biographies of financier and railroad mogul Jay Gould and WE H Harriman of the UP.  
 
I'm still working on the foundation, and some of the trim needs to be reinstalled.
 
while there is no interior, there is a little red light in the corner window...
Posted by: toptrain Posted on: May 2nd, 2013, 8:55am
*** Having just found you I am impressed by your structures and the use of space.   Your warf seen is interesting.  A very busy place. The Tower does dominate, but to me isn't the most notable of structures. Some of the smaller are eye catchers. Your 1860 station is very nice. I like the gingerbread detail squaring off the overhanging roof, with its detailed supports, standing out. The " Gandy Dancer " age of the versatile American type 4-4-0 and its 2-6-0 counterpart is a time of extravagant detailing of structures and railroad equipment. Your stations detail shows some of this periods style in contrast to the squared off  no nonsense New England design of the warehouse, warf, and other small buildings.  
** Are all the structures modeled from views you have thought of, or are they from real buildings of the past?
frank
Posted by: moocow Posted on: May 4th, 2013, 9:28pm
thanks for your kind comments.  
 
I carry a camera and when i see something i like i take a photo, sometimes i make a sketch.  i have notebooks full of sketches, notes and photos going back to the 1960s.  I this case i have combined elements from several places into one location on the layout.  
 
photo shows the station as built c1876
Posted by: moocow Posted on: May 4th, 2013, 9:39pm
this is the area I'm modeling as it appeared in 1884, photo probably taken from the grain elevator.  the hotels have sprouted along Ocean drive, but the Casino is still in the future
Posted by: moocow Posted on: May 5th, 2013, 7:56pm
I'm not sure if this is going to end up in the Narragansett module, but its on the board now.  This is a farmhouse i saw outside Canastota, NY.  I took several photos from the road and then made a sketch and finally plans.    
because of the complexity of this particular building I am using techniques which i seldom employ.  Once i had the wall sections cut out, I located where the wall sections came together and i made 1/16" slots so the wall sections will self align and lock together.
1st of three
Posted by: moocow Posted on: May 5th, 2013, 8:02pm
how the slots work for those who have never done anything like this
Posted by: moocow Posted on: May 5th, 2013, 8:54pm
I've only just begun cutting the door and window openings... there are a lot of them!
wall sections set up as a mock up
Posted by: toptrain Posted on: May 7th, 2013, 7:38am
on May 4th, 2013, 9:39pm, moocow wrote:       (Click here for original message)
this is the area I'm modeling as it appeared in 1884, photo probably taken from the grain elevator.  the hotels have sprouted along Ocean drive, but the Casino is still in the future

 
* When I see this view it is for the first time ever for me. Yes the station is on a angle that its detail isn't viewable. Only its location and roof is seen. But this didn't catch my eye. The locomotive with its one Monitor roofed passenger car did. If it wasn't for the AHM Lincoln funeral car I never would have known about this style of car. I have come to know that this was a common type of car in the 1860s and 70s.  
* The second photo shows a different station area than the first. A sheltered roof over what is a platform extension is missing on the first photo. If only that building wasn't blocking what is going on. You can see the horse and the front of a carriage. Is it picking up or dropping off passengers , freight, or doing both.
* Ambroid and another manufacture made kits of passenger cars of this type. I keep searching for them at train shows to no avail. This photo has reminded me of my search. It is a good thing , not a bad one.
* Great photo !
 Frank
Posted by: moocow Posted on: May 8th, 2013, 1:37pm
I believe you're thinking of Alexander Scale Models "Hi Baller" cars.  some came with a clerestory that could be rounded to make a monitor style roof.
 
they had cast metal sides, platforms, roofs and wooden floors.  I think they came with metal trucks and link and pin couplers.  
 
i have a few somewhere... I'll have to look for them.
Posted by: toptrain Posted on: May 9th, 2013, 5:09pm
Steve ; here is a old add for a  Alexander scale models monitor roof cars. they are separate form the crerestory roof. Have a separate ordering number. There are 4 different monitor roof cars.
Posted by: moocow Posted on: May 10th, 2013, 4:36pm
i have about a half dozen of these, many with flat roofs and some with the clerestory roof, but none with the monitor style roof, i'll have to put them on my list of things to look for!
Posted by: toptrain Posted on: May 10th, 2013, 5:44pm
Steve. I have been looking for them also.  
 What you call a flat roof most of the times is a radius roof. Like the ones on Mantua 1860 passenger cars. They have a continuous curve and so are a part of a circle with a radius to that circle. very very few are truly flat.  
frank
Posted by: moocow Posted on: May 14th, 2013, 8:26am
i just put some pic in the HO passenger car thread of HiBallers and some Binkleys
Posted by: moocow Posted on: May 27th, 2013, 8:15pm
i didn't have all the windows i needed for the farmhouse, so i ordered them.  I'm still waiting.
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Dec 4th, 2013, 10:35am
Front wall of the main section of the farmhouse
with windows in place
 
The colors are close to what was on the inspiration.
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Dec 4th, 2013, 4:18pm
Addition: side facing the road
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Dec 12th, 2013, 10:30pm
got windows, still need doors...
 
new layout progress to date
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Dec 17th, 2013, 3:02pm
the north and south end (addition?) walls
I'm still short a door, but since that door is on the rear of the main section I'm going to plunge ahead without it.
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Dec 24th, 2013, 6:07pm
Farmhouse, those aren't the roof panels, but you get the idea
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Jun 10th, 2017, 1:06pm
long time coming.  had to rip out everything and start over AGAIN after the building inspector came through.  starting over much smaller and with a lot less $.  
 
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Jun 18th, 2017, 1:27pm
testing the unfinished Kingston interchange and yard
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2017, 1:39pm
i need a single stall enginehouse and a place to turn locos around
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2017, 1:42pm
working on the roof  
obviously it is based on the John Allen enginehouse
Posted by: Henry Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2017, 2:39pm
Very nice!
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Jun 28th, 2017, 2:44pm
ready  for scenery
 
maybe i should paint that 10 wheeler
 
nahh!  been that way since 1970, why change now.
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Jul 8th, 2017, 3:48pm
new scene to the right of the enginehouse
 
Rodman's Crossing
Posted by: TAB Posted on: Aug 7th, 2017, 11:27pm
....I like the way all the colors blend together with each other....Tom
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Aug 13th, 2017, 4:10pm
should point out  
there is a view block 3 1/2 inches in front of the backdrop covered in "improved lichen" (lichen dipped in rubber cement and then in salvaged ground foam) from "the vault of the ages" (a box of stuff salvaged from 50 years of model railroading)  
the view block conceals the "escape track" which connects the staging yards
 
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Aug 15th, 2017, 3:06pm
squeezing in behind the engine house and jammed up against the backdrop is a mock up of 1/2 model compressed Boon St Station.  
 
this is the 4th mock up, each one seems to be bigger than the one before.  it has grown from 7 1/2 inches to 11 inches so far.  next try will lengthen the open shed end.
 
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Aug 15th, 2017, 3:10pm
the actual Boon St Station was 123' long and 32' wide
it is still in existence now a laundromat
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Aug 16th, 2017, 3:20pm
having grown to 12 1/2 inches the (6th) roof is under construction  
roof with formers
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Aug 20th, 2017, 1:27pm
workin' on it
 
 
the canopy has been shinglized
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Aug 26th, 2017, 4:05pm
roof complete dormer set in place to check fit.  
windows not yet cut out
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Sep 13th, 2017, 3:51pm
front wall Boon st station with bay window in place
Posted by: TAB Posted on: Sep 13th, 2017, 11:05pm
.....how did you do the stone work?......Tom
Posted by: moocow Posted on: Sep 15th, 2017, 2:44pm
the old fashioned way.  I roughed up a stip of balsa wood, then drew the stone detail on with an old ballpoint pen.