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Scratchbuilding and Kitbashing Photos

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[1]

Re: A New Layout - By moocow on 09/13/17 at 15:51:41 - 'IMG_1118-2_515x386.jpg' 53 KB
front wall Boon st station with bay window in place

[2]

Re: A New Layout - By moocow on 08/26/17 at 16:05:26 - 'IMG_0858_769x423.jpg' 56 KB
roof complete dormer set in place to check fit.  
windows not yet cut out

[3]

Re: A New Layout - By moocow on 08/20/17 at 13:27:43 - 'IMG_0828_687x343.jpg' 34 KB
workin' on it
 
 
the canopy has been shinglized

[4]

Re: A New Layout - By moocow on 08/16/17 at 15:20:26 - 'IMG_0769_724x443.jpg' 59 KB
having grown to 12 1/2 inches the (6th) roof is under construction  
roof with formers


[5]

Re: A New Layout - By moocow on 08/15/17 at 15:10:22 - 'RHODE_ISLAND_RR_003_-_Copy.jpg' 84 KB
the actual Boon St Station was 123' long and 32' wide
it is still in existence now a laundromat

[6]

Re: A New Layout - By moocow on 08/15/17 at 15:06:31 - 'Boon_st_stat_mock_up_IMG_0766_3_724x376.jpg' 55 KB
squeezing in behind the engine house and jammed up against the backdrop is a mock up of 1/2 model compressed Boon St Station.  
 
this is the 4th mock up, each one seems to be bigger than the one before.  it has grown from 7 1/2 inches to 11 inches so far.  next try will lengthen the open shed end.
 


[7]

Re: A New Layout - By moocow on 07/08/17 at 15:48:50 - 'Rodman_s_crossing_IMG_0552_3_903x505.jpg' 79 KB
new scene to the right of the enginehouse
 
Rodman's Crossing


[8]

Re: A New Layout - By moocow on 06/28/17 at 14:44:57 - 'IMG_0422_836x546.jpg' 76 KB
ready  for scenery
 
maybe i should paint that 10 wheeler
 
nahh!  been that way since 1970, why change now.

[9]

Re: A New Layout - By moocow on 06/22/17 at 13:42:36 - 'IMG_0376_2_938x638.jpg' 84 KB
working on the roof  
obviously it is based on the John Allen enginehouse

[10]

Re: A New Layout - By moocow on 06/22/17 at 13:39:56 - 'enginehouse_under_construction_IMG_0374_2_923x546.jpg' 85 KB
i need a single stall enginehouse and a place to turn locos around

[11]

Re: A New Layout - By moocow on 06/18/17 at 13:27:07 - 'kingston_IMG_0347_3_772x579.jpg' 71 KB
testing the unfinished Kingston interchange and yard

[12]

Re: Building period correct 1860s freight cars - By moocow on 06/10/17 at 13:09:36 - 'IMG_0203_772x579.jpg' 84 KB
some coal jennies
 
the body is a block of wood i ran through the table saw.  the running gear is a modified Athearn car truck.

[13]

Re: A New Layout - By moocow on 06/10/17 at 13:06:23 - 'IMG_0338_4-detail_724x398.jpg' 68 KB
long time coming.  had to rip out everything and start over AGAIN after the building inspector came through.  starting over much smaller and with a lot less $.  
 


[14]

Re: A 0-6-0 camelback switcher. Body scratch built. - By toptrain on 03/11/17 at 06:35:49 - 'IMG_8272_640x480.jpg' 118 KB
** #45 got its first spin today here is the Fireman's side.
frank

[15]

Re: A 0-6-0 camelback switcher. Body scratch built. - By toptrain on 03/11/17 at 06:32:53 - 'IMG_8276_640x416.jpg' 121 KB
Two days ago my son Stephen brought over the finished locomotive. Views were taken on the Frankford turntable of ANNA #45 at Bergen Point.
 Engineers side.
 


[16]

Re: A 0-6-0 camelback switcher. Body scratch built. - By toptrain on 03/11/17 at 06:27:25 - 'IMG_8004_640x543.jpg' 141 KB
The third post shows a from the rear view of the backhead.
frank


[17]

Re: A 0-6-0 camelback switcher. Body scratch built. - By toptrain on 03/11/17 at 06:25:25 - 'IMG_8002a_640x480.jpg' 112 KB
Photo 2 shows the Fireman's side of the 0-6-0 camelback switcher.
frank
 Second the Fireman,s side;
 
 


[18]

A 0-6-0 camelback switcher. Body scratch built. - By toptrain on 03/11/17 at 06:22:01 - 'IMG_8003_640x480.jpg' 106 KB
The shops ( My son Stephen) at Saylorsburg PA have completed another locomotive for his "ANNA Railroad". The body is scratch built to fit a existing drive by Bachmann. First three views (posts) to show the Body.
First Engineers side.
 photo 1:


[19]

Re:  CRR of NJ P-7s class, 4-4-2 Atlantic type, #800 to 805. - By toptrain on 04/25/16 at 11:50:27 - '6b_IMG_5312.jpg' 82 KB
Well today I put the frame and drive back together. Here it is. Here the motor and the tower gear box is visible.
 frank

[20]

Re:  CRR of NJ P-7s class, 4-4-2 Atlantic type, #800 to 805. - By toptrain on 04/25/16 at 11:43:44 - 'at_model_shop_2c.jpg' 77 KB
Well Tom I got out to the Hobby Shop and there was a Custom Brass Model there on display. It is a Reading P6 class in excellent condition for sale. I had my camera and got a photo of it, and it made my day. If only mine once done could look that good. The photo shows that the tender kit I have is correct for the CRR of NJ model I am making.
 frank

[21]

Re:  CRR of NJ P-7s class, 4-4-2 Atlantic type, #800 to 805. - By toptrain on 04/19/16 at 19:33:57 - 'CRR_of_NJ_4-4-2.jpg' 105 KB
** Now this next photo is of what I have today to do this project. The tender kit to the right is a standard CRR of NJ 24' camel back tender. Aviable from Dan Hicks of Allentown PA.
frank

[22]

Re: Hudson Electric Wire Car - By hudsonelectric on 08/26/07 at 02:36:46 - 'Line_Car_14.jpg' 54 KB
Here's the car with the platform lowered and the side railings collapsed inward for clearance.  

[23]

Hudson Electric Wire Car - By hudsonelectric on 08/26/07 at 02:34:48 - 'Line_Car_13.jpg' 38 KB
Wire cars came in all types and sizes on trolley, interurban, and heavy traction railroads. This model is based on the CSB&SS's wire car with a hydraulic lift platform. It started out as an Ambroid Western Union materials car. I cut the sides, floor, and roof to about 40 scale feet and inserted center baggage doors. Although it's not shown, there's a door and diaphram on the opposite end of the car. I still have the other side to complete, the underbody details to install, and some other work befor it's completed. In this shot, the crew is testing out the hydraulic platform.  

[24]

Re: Express Reefers on the Hudson Electric - By hudsonelectric on 07/15/07 at 12:36:27 - 'TEA_Express_Reefer_1.jpg' 17 KB
Here's an end view showing some of the additional details that I added.

[25]

Express Reefers on the Hudson Electric - By hudsonelectric on 07/15/07 at 12:35:40 - 'TEA_Express_Reefer_2.jpg' 10 KB
The Traction Express Agency has the exclusive express business on the Hudson Electric RR. Why? The HEC OWNS it!  But express reefers could have been seen carrying perishables anywhere in the country and on any road. Outfitted with high-speed trucks, steam, signal, and brake lines, these 50' cars were run by most all passenger carrying class 1 roads and could be found in most any long-haul passenger consist and night train as head end business. This is # 1037 right out of the paint shop from overhaul.  It's a Walthers model upgraded with some Cal-Scale details, lettered with Microscale and Champ decals, as well as my own custom TEA herald. The finish, by the way, is Accupaint Erie green. The next step is to spray a flat overcoat on the model to hide the decal film.

[26]

Re: Need some advice - By TAB on 06/19/07 at 12:51:11 - 'Cutting_Windows_5.jpg' 22 KB
CUTTING WINDOW OPENINGS…(STEP 5 OR ANOTHER OPTION)
 
 
Depending on the situation there is another way to open up rectangular openings in styrene plastic. The opening is laid out as in Step 1 but then two diagonal lines are drawn as in Figure 5.
 
The lines represented as the finished size are lightly scribed with the Xacto knife and the straight edge but not cut through. Work from the corners to the middle of the line then turn the piece and scribe the remainder of the line. This prevents over scribing at the corners. Now cut through the diagonal lines from A to B and C to D. Again do this in a series of light passes with the knife and again work from the corners to the center. When the “X” is cut through, press down on the triangular shaped sections. The pieces should snap out cleanly up to the scribed lines.
 
Whatever technique is used, practice makes perfect. When you are ready to attach the windows and doors, position them in their location and use a small amount of liquid plastic cement, applied with a small brush, from the rear to hold the pieces in place. If the windows and doors are to be a different color than the walls I like to paint these pieces first prior to gluing.
 
I hope this has been of some help…Tom

[27]

Re: Need some advice - By TAB on 06/19/07 at 12:21:38 - 'Cutting_Windows_4.jpg' 26 KB
CUTTING WINDOW OPENINGS  (STEP 4 OF 5)

 
As shown in Figure #4, the area shown in red needs to be removed. A flat file or a sanding stick can be used. If using a file select one that only has the cutting ridges on two opposite surfaces. The other two surfaces are smooth. Using such a file prevents over cutting the finished opening at the corners. I prefer making a sanding stick from a suitably sized piece of wood. I like to use one that is about ¾ the size of the finished opening. This reduces the number of sanding passes and results in a squarer opening. Two different grits of sand paper can be glued to opposite sides of the stick. For the stick, I prefer bass wood which should be available at hobby shops or craft stores in various sizes similar to balsa wood shapes. The sand paper could be any product you find suitable. I’ve used sand paper from Sears and also a model product known as Flexi Grit made by Plastruct. Continue sanding or filing for all the openings. Test fit the windows as you go and make any adjustments necessary to the size of the opening.

[28]

Re: Need some advice - By TAB on 06/19/07 at 11:22:02 - 'Cutting_Windows_3.jpg' 24 KB
CUTTING WINDOW OPENINGS  (STEP 3 OF 5)

 
Chuck your drill into the pin vice. The drill size should be appropriate to the size of the window opening. I do this by eye but something from a #60 to #70 drill should be suitable.
 
Drill through the plastic at the holes marked. Now use the scale rule, as a straight edge, to draw a pencil line that connects the holes. In the case of a door that is positioned at the bottom edge of the wall, draw two lines down from the holes to the bottom edge. These lines should be parallel to the line that represents the finished opening.
 
Now its time to make some cuts. Use the Xacto knife and your scale rule to cut through the lines marked between the holes. The holes will serve as a natural stop to prevent over cutting. Do not attempt to make these cuts with a single pass of the knife. Make several passes, with light pressure, till the styrene is cut through. Repeat for the remainder of the opening. When done the piece should fall out.

[29]

Re: Hudson Electric Line Car - By hudsonelectric on 06/11/07 at 15:42:46 - 'Line_Car_10.jpg' 16 KB
The CSS&SB original also had an extending platform that could give the main platform some extra length. Here I've added the extension and it's weighted on the inside end with a small white metal casting to keep it from falling onto the adjacent tracks. It slides in and out on pieces of angle stock...next come the knock-down safety railings!  

[30]

Re: Hudson Electric Line Car - By hudsonelectric on 06/11/07 at 15:39:26 - 'Line_Car_7.jpg' 21 KB
And here it is in position....

[31]

Re: Hudson Electric Line Car - By hudsonelectric on 06/11/07 at 15:35:48 - 'Line_Car_8.jpg' 13 KB
Going up....

[32]

Re: Hudson Electric Line Car - By hudsonelectric on 06/11/07 at 15:35:03 - 'Line_Car_9.jpg' 14 KB
This is the rotating work platform with the hydraulic piston...

[33]

Re: Hudson Electric Line Car - By hudsonelectric on 06/11/07 at 15:32:15 - 'Line_Car_5.jpg' 15 KB
Here's a full length view of the roof platform...

[34]

Re: Hudson Electric Line Car - By hudsonelectric on 06/11/07 at 15:30:35 - 'Line_Car_4.jpg' 26 KB
I also added an old Walthers passenger car diaphram on one end...

[35]

Re: Hudson Electric Line Car - By hudsonelectric on 06/11/07 at 15:27:35 - 'Line_Car_1.jpg' 16 KB
The kit came with some good white metal castings....

[36]

Hudson Electric Line Car - By hudsonelectric on 06/11/07 at 15:26:22 - 'Line_Car_2.jpg' 17 KB
Electric railroad line cars were used for maintenance and repairs of the overhead catenary and power wires. Taking some ideas from the Chicago, South Shore & South Bend's line car, began laying out the platform and car body. The core is an Ambroid Western Union materials 50' car cut down to 42'. I added steel Tichy ends, inserted a pair of Bethlehem Car Works baggage car doors, and began building the roof platform. It'll ride on the freight trucks that came with the Ambroid kit...Central Valley trucks, I would think. The CSS&SB used a former steel MU car for its line car with a hydraulic pump that would raise and lower a rotating platform mounted on the roof. This would allow crews access to the wires on one track over as well as the wires for the track the car was on. I'm using the same principle here.  

[37]

Re: Model Railroad Photography - By S-12_Dave on 06/01/07 at 18:39:02 - '5012.at.speed.sm.jpg' 178 KB
Hi all,
 
I have always liked to experiment taking photo's with the models actually running. Let's face it, that's what we normally do with the real thing. The problem is... the lighting is not the best on my layout, and my digital camera can in no way be considered "top of the line". On the "plus side"....I can take dozens and dozens of shots with the digital camera, and try something different in every shot. It's costs nothing to throw away all of the "duds" to find that one good photo. In the below photo,  I actually "paced" the train as it ran along... moving the camera as closely to the exact same speed as the locomotive as I could. I deleted dozens of shots before I came up with this one.  

[38]

Re: Model Railroad Photography - By joneau261 on 05/29/07 at 18:12:23 - 'P4092873_800x599.jpg' 62 KB
To get enough light in my shots, I usually hold a lamp above the model. I have also learned that the flash is a big annoyance to the picture. I either use something to block the flash, or I hold the camera back so it doesn't cause a problem.
 
When the lamp is used though, it usually adds enough light, and the flash doesn't go off. More often though, I'll try to use sunlight for the pictures.
 
Here's what I usually do for pictures

[39]

Re: Heavy Traction on the Hudson Electric - By hudsonelectric on 05/20/07 at 16:31:06 - 'EP5-14.jpg' 13 KB
Here's a shot of the completed side decaling job.  

[40]

Re: Heavy Traction on the Hudson Electric - By hudsonelectric on 05/19/07 at 12:40:01 - 'EP5-13.jpg' 18 KB
My order came in from Microscale, so I started putting the stripes in on the main grey band. I thought that 3 white stripes might look a bit crowded, but 2 just didn't seem right to me...probably because I'm partial to the wings on the Erie diamond herald.    

[41]

Re: Heavy Traction on the Hudson Electric - By hudsonelectric on 05/18/07 at 17:45:23 - 'EP5-12.jpg' 44 KB
Here's a shot of a test of the pnuematic pantograph raising/lowering system. Pans up! We have contact WITH the wire and are now at 11,000 volts AC!  Note the missing step to the cab....gotta get that fixed. Can't have the crew climbing up an ol' wooden step ladder to get into the cab, now!  


[42]

Re: Heavy Traction on the Hudson Electric - By hudsonelectric on 05/17/07 at 13:27:59 - 'EP5-11.jpg' 25 KB
I started adding rails and grabs to the nose and cab door. Because the nose access hatch opens outward on the HE EP-5, the rail on the right is offset a bit in order to allow for the door hinges to swing and not have the door open onto the railing. The little bit of yellow really adds to the color scheme, but this will be the only yellow...I may see how thinner safety stripes on the pilot look in yellow, but I don't want to over do it. I ordered narrower white decal striping from Microscale to add to the wide grey side stripes. Once the body 'n fender work is done, I'll start on the electronics phase...headlights, decoder, fiber-optics, etc.  

[43]

Re: Heavy Traction on the Hudson Electric - By hudsonelectric on 05/16/07 at 11:07:28 - 'EP5-10.jpg' 14 KB
Thanks for the kind words, guys, I really appreciate your comments. Here's a nose shot of some of the spotting detail differences between the New Haven EP-5 and the Hudson Electric's EP-5. The HE MUed their locos in pairs for long freight drags, especially with ore and other mineral loaded hoppers from the Ramapo, NJ & Suffern, NY mining areas. Note the 5-chime Nathan air horn on the roof. I'll add grabs and cut bars next to the nose.  

[44]

Re: Need Repainting Help - By dehammon on 05/07/07 at 14:05:55 - 'pic_002a.jpg' 86 KB
Ouch... that hurt....
 
Look at this paint job!!!!
 
I could never match this myself!!!

[45]

Repainting - By dehammon on 05/06/07 at 07:23:44 - 'pic_004a.jpg' 57 KB
What is the best way to fix a locomotive's paint job?  
 
I was doing some renumbering and got carried away and messed up a small section of a painted area, and now need to fix it.
 
See picture below....

[46]

Son of a Bay Window Caboose!! - By hudsonelectric on 04/30/07 at 16:33:53 - 'MOW_Caboose_2.jpg' 27 KB
I'm a mod on another site and we're doing an MOW rolling stock challenge. My entry will consist of a caboose, a gon, and a 'line car' used for maintaining catenary. This is a shot of the caboose so far. I cheated a bit by pulling this out from a stalled project and re-assigning it to MOW chores. Again, it's a Silver Streak caboose body on a Central Valley floor and frame. The door is a cut-down 6.5 scale foot box car door from the Parts Dept.  

[47]

Re: Heavy Traction on the Hudson Electric - By hudsonelectric on 04/28/07 at 07:43:26 - 'EP5-6.jpg' 14 KB
The sanding's completed and the shell is ready to be cleaned, primed, and painted.  

[48]

Re: Silver Valley Central Streak Transfer Caboose Bash! - By hudsonelectric on 04/26/07 at 22:28:15 - 'Xfer_caboose_22.jpg' 17 KB
Here's a shot of the completed car. I added a rerail frog on the side, some stuff on the long end of the deck, and need to add the KD scale couplers when I get some more. This has been a fun little project and it'll make a neat caboose to tag along with a switcher around the yards!  

[49]

Re: Silver Valley Central Streak Transfer Caboose Bash! - By hudsonelectric on 04/23/07 at 12:11:00 - 'Xfer_caboose_21.jpg' 22 KB
The main side windows were drop-sash types. Here's one half open... More to come as I wap it up, so stay tuned!  

[50]

Re: Silver Valley Central Streak Transfer Caboose Bash! - By hudsonelectric on 04/23/07 at 12:09:47 - 'Xfer_caboose_20.jpg' 24 KB
Here's just some of the junk that collects on an open space of a transfer caboose...

[51]

Re: Silver Valley Central Streak Transfer Caboose Bash! - By hudsonelectric on 04/23/07 at 12:08:20 - 'Xfer_caboose_19.jpg' 21 KB
Getting ready to complete the model here...but still have some things to do. I moved the body back on the frame to create a larger space on one end for any tool or supply loading that may be needed while the crummy is out and about in the busy yard. This would be rerail gear, etc. First, though, I had to put in the window glazing and have a crewman hanging out of the window.  

[52]

Re: Silver Valley Central Streak Transfer Caboose Bash! - By hudsonelectric on 04/21/07 at 09:53:48 - 'Xfer_caboose_18.jpg' 18 KB
Although I am not a believer in 'over-weathering', studies of photos and my own observations and archtectural spray painting experience guides me along the way. Before the catalyzed urethanes and chemical UV screens came into use, enamels would become faded and porous, allowing them to stain, chalk, and streak. The mid-'50s era that I model was still a time for conventional industrial paints and this weathering job is moving in that direction. This caboose is used for transfer and train make-up duties in the Camden Terminal strage yard, 24/7. It's in an industrial area and is subjected to all of the pollutants and oily diesel smoke that goes along with it. It's still about 80% complete, but I'm getting there with it.  

[53]

Re: Silver Valley Central Streak Transfer Caboose Bash! - By hudsonelectric on 04/20/07 at 18:00:10 - 'Xfer_caboose_17.jpg' 20 KB
Here's another progress shot...I have to add a rerail frog to one side, finish installing the rails, put in window glazing, get the crew in, and add some other stuff. I'm weathering as I go along with the paint, too.  

[54]

Re: Silver Valley Central Streak Transfer Caboose Bash! - By hudsonelectric on 04/16/07 at 15:24:04 - 'Xfer_caboose_15.jpg' 21 KB
The end and side railings are going in...

[55]

Re: Silver Valley Central Streak Transfer Caboose Bash! - By hudsonelectric on 04/15/07 at 06:07:20 - 'Xfer_caboose_14.jpg' 22 KB
Next will come the body 'n fender work. The car body will be red with my Camden Terminal Company herald under the window. The decking will be brown-black and I'll have to add plenty of railings for safety. More to come, so stay tuned!  

[56]

Re: Silver Valley Central Streak Transfer Caboose Bash! - By hudsonelectric on 04/15/07 at 06:04:29 - 'Xfer_caboose_12.jpg' 22 KB
And the smokejack, too. Originally, I used the leaf spring Bettendorf-style trucks that came with the Silver Streak kit and I believe they are old Central Valley trucks. I replaced them with a pair of older Andrews-type caboose trucks from Bethlehem Car Works.

[57]

Re: Silver Valley Central Streak Transfer Caboose Bash! - By hudsonelectric on 04/15/07 at 05:59:53 - 'Xfer_caboose_10.jpg' 20 KB
Next I added the steps and end sills that came with the kit...

[58]

Re: Silver Valley Central Streak Transfer Caboose Bash! - By hudsonelectric on 04/15/07 at 05:57:24 - 'IMG_2156.jpg' 13 KB
Here you can see how the walls and ends sit flush on the frame and floor...

[59]

Re: Silver Valley Central Streak Transfer Caboose Bash! - By hudsonelectric on 04/15/07 at 05:52:40 - 'IMG_2155.jpg' 14 KB
Here's an interior view, The horizontal bar on the lower part of the bay window interior is the piece that would normally sit on the car floor. You can also see where I cut out a section of the side wall to allow the bay window to be moved up allowing the body assembly to sit flush on the frame and floor.

[60]

Re: Silver Valley Central Streak Transfer Caboose Bash! - By hudsonelectric on 04/15/07 at 05:48:31 - 'IMG_2154.jpg' 17 KB
Here's a view of the end and wall together. I had to cut the bottoms of the car ends and trim a section of the car sides off and raise the bay window up to the top line of the car side. This would allow the body to sit flush on the frame and floor assembly.

[61]

Re: Silver Valley Central Streak Transfer Caboose Bash! - By hudsonelectric on 04/15/07 at 05:45:47 - 'IMG_2153.jpg' 17 KB
I wanted to make the body small like the prototypes, but large enough to house the bay window, a toilet, stove, locker space, etc. This led to a body length of 15 scale feet. I cut out sections of the wood sides from the Silver Streak kit and began to put it together. The car ends and bay windows are the original metal castings from the kit.

[62]

Re: Silver Valley Central Streak Transfer Caboose Bash! - By hudsonelectric on 04/15/07 at 05:41:37 - 'Xfer_caboose_11.jpg' 23 KB
...and after adding the Tichy parts.

[63]

Re: Silver Valley Central Streak Transfer Caboose Bash! - By hudsonelectric on 04/15/07 at 05:40:45 - 'IMG_2151.jpg' 11 KB
The frame assembly after it had been cut down...

[64]

Silver Valley Central Streak Transfer Caboose Bash! - By hudsonelectric on 04/15/07 at 05:37:46 - 'IMG_2149.jpg' 21 KB
Ya know? YA KNOW??    Sometimes ya just hafta  build something that ya need and not wait around. Over the years, transfer caboose models have come and gone...everything from expensive brass models from Overland to a terrific bay window job by Walthers painted up in MOW grey (the old Tru Scale model, I believe). And, of course, when I finally decide I'd like one, there's nothing around...sold out, been gone.   For me, this is a a real DIY craftsman hobby, so I decided I'll make my own! Don't need no stinkin' brass or plastic RTR model!   Central Valley still makes one kit, a styrene stock car, and the frame and floor are available seperately, so that is the base. The body is made from an old Silver Streak SP wood sided bay window caboose kit that I picked up on eBay. First I took the Central Valley frame and floor and cut out two sections shortening the base to 30 scale feet. Because the brake details are molded into the frame, this brought the brake reservoir too close to the bolster to allow the truck to swing freely. I cut off the reservoir tank, AB valve, and cylinder, and replaced them with Tichy parts. Here's a shot of the underframe and floor from Central Valley....

[65]

Re: SD38 Bash Help! - By towny72 on 04/09/07 at 21:12:14 - '878.jpg' 60 KB
TAB, this pic is the unit I am modeling. You can see clearly how the hand brake is mounted on this girl. Removing the wheel shouldnt be a prob, I took a look at it and it will pop right off. Some light sanding will make the nose smooth. But then you look at this ratchet and question marks fill my head.

[66]

Re: Loco Lettering - By Henry on 03/15/07 at 13:19:39 - 'MKT.gif' 4 KB
I think the "M" is a little wider than a lot of sans-serif lettering styles. I made this from an arial font and widened the M by hand.
 
I also made an avatar out of it while I was at it
 
Check this link for a Microscale HO decal set, 87-180: LINK URL
 
It is out of stock, but you may be able to find it at a dealer somewhere.
 
Henry
 


[67]

Re: Another Caboose from a Box of Wood Sticks - By hudsonelectric on 01/13/07 at 09:16:32 - 'OS_Braced_Cabeese_12.jpg' 169 KB
...and a shot of the working marker lights, too. I took my time building this kit and I still found that it's a project that will almost tell me how it will turn out. For modelers who want to try a different kind of model to build, they shouldn't be intimidated by these kits. You can build them straight out of the box or make modifications as you like. Painting can be done with a set of smaller brushes and craft store acrylic paints, some fine sand paper and standard hobby knife are about all of the tools you'ld need, and I used ACC with the fast dry spray as the cement. I like these kits....they take on an individual character of their own that you just can't get from a cookie cutter styrene stamped out kit. Although the laser-cut wood kits do build up to be finer in appearance, the experience gained from building kits like these are basic skills that you can use for any other aspect of model building in this hobby.   Think I'll do another one sometime!

[68]

Re: Another Caboose from a Box of Wood Sticks - By hudsonelectric on 01/13/07 at 09:07:34 - 'OS_Braced_Cabeese_9.jpg' 162 KB
and an end shot....

[69]

Re: Another Caboose from a Box of Wood Sticks - By hudsonelectric on 01/13/07 at 08:59:50 - 'OS_Braced_Cabeese_6.jpg' 128 KB
I added shades to the cupola and mounted it to the roof. I also added trim to hide any gaps between the cupola body and the car roof. The roof is the typical curved roof stock for these kits with painted 400 grit wet/dry paper as the roof covering for both the car body and cupola. The car is painted in brushed-on acrylic tomato red with a black roof. I went over the color coat with a brushed-on semi-gloss clear to deepen the color and prepare it for decals.

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Re: Another Caboose from a Box of Wood Sticks - By hudsonelectric on 01/13/07 at 08:47:05 - 'OS_Braced_Cabeese_4.jpg' 187 KB
This is the white metal casting for the cupola as supplied with the kit. It looks okay, but didn't exactly fit. These kits had looser tolerances because of the way the materials were cut and the technology at the time.

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Re: Another Caboose from a Box of Wood Sticks - By hudsonelectric on 01/13/07 at 08:40:08 - 'OS_Braced_Cabeese_2-2.jpg' 142 KB
In this shot, you can see the side door modification that I made. The door is a left over brass baggage car door from a Bethlehem Car Works baggage car kit.

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Re: Crossings - Hand Laying... - By dehammon on 12/30/06 at 09:29:38 - 'crossing.jpg' 119 KB
Picture#4 - One of my Geeps at the crossing....

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Re: Crossings - Hand Laying... - By dehammon on 12/30/06 at 09:21:08 - 'crossing_002s.jpg' 68 KB
Picture#3 - The crossing proper...

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Re: Crossings - Hand Laying... - By dehammon on 12/30/06 at 09:18:57 - 'crossing_004s.jpg' 44 KB
Picture#2 - The short leg of the crossing

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Re: Crossings - Hand Laying... - By dehammon on 12/05/06 at 20:27:52 - 'crossing02.jpg' 152 KB
I've took a step backwards and redid the crossing. it was looking too funky.... knew it could look better. I have the ties and rail in place, and i'm about to complete the epoxy work.  
 
question i have though is, how far from the crossing do i make my gaps in the rail? i'll be running 2 truck geeps if that is of any help...  
 
and now the picture...

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Re: New River coal mine kitbash photos anyone? - By S-12_Dave on 12/02/06 at 15:47:50 - 'M.Harry.E.03.jpg' 79 KB
There are parts of two kits in this model.

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Re: Weathering tips and techniques - By LEHIGHVALLEE on 11/30/06 at 09:26:47 - 'FB-1_655x307.jpg' 42 KB
  Sometimes tool makers go to great lengths to add detail to plastic diesels, they add levels of detail underneath screens to show braces, radiator shutters and interior detail that would show behind the screen. Unfortunatly when painted this detail just becomes lost in a solid color. Here is a way to add contrast to pop out those details. In the photo we have an Alco B unit that has the bracing simulated under the screening along the top of the unit. Maskoff the entire screened area to start and paint it  a warm toned light gray (light gray with a few drops of tan). Mask off the detail you want to show and spray the rest of the screened area a dark flat gray. For the finishing touch very lightly dry brush the black areas with the light gray and lightly dry brush the gray areas with black to pop out the screen detail and give it a three dimensional look.
 
     Also note in this photo how drybrushing an earth toned paint on the trucks and underbody has really accented the detail. Another paint detail to note is the oil spillage from the crankcase breather on the roof of the locomotive, the oil streaks on the side of the engine were done with an index card mask

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Re: Weathering tips and techniques - By LEHIGHVALLEE on 11/29/06 at 15:47:07 - 'CEMENT_HOPPER_620x414.jpg' 36 KB
 Covered hoppers that carried cement always seemed to be heavily weathered due to spillage of the lading and the corrosive nature of raw cement.  For this car I used ground gray pastel chalk affixed to the roof with artists matte medium to look like spilled cement which on the prototype would build up to a depth of several inches. For the sides I used the same technique as the green NYC box car by making rust spots and then applying streaks through a slit cut in an index card in shades of gray and rust colored paint.  
 
  I wondered why covered hoppers always seemed to rust on the lower part of the carbody so I asked my father who was chief mechanical officer of the LV. When these cars were unloaded the powdered cement wouldn't flow well so the people unloading the car would pound on the side sheets with sledge hammers! This accounts for the weathering patterns, they couldn't reach higher than that to strike the car!

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Re: Weathering tips and techniques - By LEHIGHVALLEE on 11/29/06 at 15:18:57 - 'LV_GON_691x290.jpg' 41 KB
 Plastic is a wonderful materiel but it is lacking when trying to duplicate the look of well worn wood. here are a few tips to add grain and splits to styrene. For light wood grain effects a few passes in the direction of the grain with a medium grit sandpaper (150 grit) will add texture. For more extreme wood grain effects dragging a razor saw in the direction of the grain will look like very weathered wood. Knots and splits can be added with a scribing tool or the back of an X-acto blade.
 
   The car shown in the photo is a Weaver O-scale war emergency composite gondola. The prototype was designed and built during WW2 to conserve steel by using wood sides with steel bracing. These cars took a tremendous beating on the Lehigh Valley while  being used as mill gondolas carrying steel products. The wood sides were vulnerable to being punctured by the lading or crushed by over head cranes hitting the top angle of the side which would splinter the top board. The carmen would patch smaller holes with a piece of sheet steel bolted to the existing  boards.
   
 
    On the model, before it was painted, I spent about a week scribing in wood grain and splintering the side boards. Larger holes were patched with .005 styrene panels with rivet heads to simulate the carriage bolts that the shop crews would use. On the interior of the car I cut in the joints between boards and used a dremel tool to drill small holes to show where the boards were bolted to the sides. This is just to show you that weathering is not always paint and chalk but can actualy be part of the modeling phase before the painting and finishing phase.

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Re: Weathering tips and techniques - By sgp__Rail_Fan on 11/28/06 at 18:12:20 - 'Forney_Creek_025.jpg' 70 KB
Hey, LEHIGHVALLEE great work, and you got some neat techniques! I have tried my luck with weathering and luck is what I have.
 
 I have found that when you are working with coaches that are meant to look like they are made of wood (in my case Bachman On30 coaches) it is some times a good idea to take a regular screw driver (or proper modeling knife) and go between the wood on the car where there is lettering.  
 
This is a pic of my On30 coach before the weathering was spread properly.

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Re: Weathering tips and techniques - By LEHIGHVALLEE on 11/27/06 at 18:35:41 - 'NYCG8.jpg' 247 KB
  And another. Thats it for now, hope it was instructive!

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Re: Weathering tips and techniques - By LEHIGHVALLEE on 11/27/06 at 18:33:56 - 'NYCG7.jpg' 198 KB
 The finished product.

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Re: Weathering tips and techniques - By LEHIGHVALLEE on 11/27/06 at 18:32:45 - 'NYCG6.jpg' 252 KB
 Now for the finishing touches a light spray of dust some restenciling of the dimensional data and repack dates with different paint and using scrap dry transfers

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Re: Weathering tips and techniques - By LEHIGHVALLEE on 11/27/06 at 18:21:43 - 'NYCG5.jpg' 220 KB

 
Here's a real fun part, cut some slits in an index card tapering toward the bottom and then spray a thin rust colored mix through the slits lining it up with the rust spots and scrapes that you added in the last step.

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Re: Weathering tips and techniques - By LEHIGHVALLEE on 11/27/06 at 18:15:38 - 'NYCG4.jpg' 218 KB
 Taking Tamiya flat brown I started to highlight seams and make random rust spots on the body.

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Re: Weathering tips and techniques - By LEHIGHVALLEE on 11/27/06 at 18:12:45 - '45150013.jpg' 202 KB
 Often roofs that were painted black were not actualy painted but covered in car cement which is like a roofing tar. This stuff did not peel like paint did on the galvanized roofs. Straight black is a no-no for modeling, a better choice is a medium gray which will appear black but not hide detail. On this car I masked and painted the roof my dark gray mix.

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Re: Weathering tips and techniques - By LEHIGHVALLEE on 11/27/06 at 18:06:20 - 'NYCG2.jpg' 215 KB
 A great tip for simulating faded paint is to lightly airbrush a very thinned mix of flat white paint. As you can see in the picture it instantly fades the green and really doesn't affect the look of the lettering.  In this shot one half is faded  and the other half of the side is untouched.

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Re: Weathering tips and techniques - By LEHIGHVALLEE on 11/27/06 at 18:02:15 - 'NYCG1.jpg' 245 KB

   Let's move on to another NYC boxcar, this time in Jade green. With this one we'll explore techniques for simulating fading, oxidized paint and rust.

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Re: Weathering tips and techniques - By LEHIGHVALLEE on 11/27/06 at 16:25:17 - 'NYCR14.jpg' 208 KB
  And here she is, the finished product. Looks a whole lot better than when we started.

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Re: Weathering tips and techniques - By LEHIGHVALLEE on 11/27/06 at 16:14:46 - 'NYCR12.jpg' 223 KB
 If it looks to overdone you can remove some of the weathering. I use a small wad of paper towel soaked in Fantastik to clean any excess. Just don't make it so wet that it runs all over.

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Re: Weathering tips and techniques - By LEHIGHVALLEE on 11/27/06 at 16:06:23 - 'NYCR11.jpg' 213 KB
Using the same technique with the index card highlight the rivet seams. Using the edge of the card as a mask spray the door, the eaves, sills and ends.

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Re: Weathering tips and techniques - By LEHIGHVALLEE on 11/27/06 at 16:02:25 - 'NYCR9.jpg' 236 KB
To dull the roof down use a thinned mixture of the paint used on the underframe. Mask off the roofwalk and take a index card and cut a slot in it as shown. Spray though the slot and highlight the roof ribs and seams (see the paint on the taped up roof walk). Lightly spray the entire roof to dull to your satisfaction.

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Re: Weathering tips and techniques - By LEHIGHVALLEE on 11/27/06 at 15:54:16 - 'NYCR8.jpg' 234 KB
 This is what the roofwalk should look like when done. Note that the roof itself is to bright and shiny.

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Re: Weathering tips and techniques - By LEHIGHVALLEE on 11/27/06 at 15:51:32 - 'NYCR7.jpg' 226 KB
  The wood roof walk is next and recieves a "wood" color, in this case deck tan, after that has dried give it a black wash to darken and bring out the detail.

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Re: Weathering tips and techniques - By LEHIGHVALLEE on 11/27/06 at 15:48:03 - 'NYCR6.jpg' 196 KB
  Here's how to simulate peeling paint on a galvanized freight car roof. Freight car roofs were usualy made of galvanized steel which did not hold paint well. Certain places like the roof ribs and along the edges of the raised panels would hold paint longer. Use a flat aluminum paint and randomly paint splotches trying to keep them irregular as shown.

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Re: Weathering tips and techniques - By LEHIGHVALLEE on 11/27/06 at 15:36:27 - 'NYCR5.jpg' 196 KB
  Dry-brush the truck sideframes with a medium brown like light earth, flat earth etc. this will really make the detail pop out on these, you can also drybrush some high lights on the underframe if you wish. Now the trucks can be reassembled and put back on the car to hold the car while finishing or do like I do and use an old pair of "shop trucks".

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Re: Weathering tips and techniques - By LEHIGHVALLEE on 11/27/06 at 15:30:03 - 'NYCR4.jpg' 169 KB
Paint the trucks with the same mixture, don't get paint in the journals, see the tape squares covering them. I use a paintbrush handle through the bolster to hold the truck while painting.

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Re: Weathering tips and techniques - By LEHIGHVALLEE on 11/27/06 at 15:25:40 - 'NYCR3.jpg' 198 KB
  The first step is to paint the underframe. Remove the trucks and pop the wheel sets out of the trucks, use small squares of masking tape to cover the inside of the journals to keep paint out, also either brush paint the wheel face and backs or leave unpainted, DO NOT paint wheel treads. Mix up a medium brown gray for your airbrush, a good starting point is 1/2 Tamiya hull red and 1/2 Tamiya nuetral gray. Since the car is getting weathered I don't bother to mask the body but instead use a file card as shown to block the paint spray, a little overspray on the car won't matter as it will become part of the weathering

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Re: Weathering tips and techniques - By LEHIGHVALLEE on 11/27/06 at 15:09:11 - 'NYC_R1.jpg' 221 KB
 Now we're going to do a RTR box car step by step. Our starting point is a Intermountain O scale box car with NYC markings. Before any painting it is a good idea to wash and dry the piece for good adhesion of the paint and no dust specks, cat hair etc.

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Re: Weathering tips and techniques - By LEHIGHVALLEE on 11/27/06 at 12:14:36 - 'SAL_BOX.jpg' 226 KB
 This is what I mean by being subtle, this car appears fairly clean but when you look close you can see the mud trails left on the car end  from the car wheels of adjacent cars as well as faint highlights of panel lines and seams


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