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Dispatchers
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   Author  Topic: Dispatchers  (Read 1951 times)
Railroadman
Historian
Posts: 1035
Re: Dispatchers
 
« Reply #20 on: May 8th, 2005, 8:25am »
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O Cool you push a foot pedal down to que up the radio??

Logged

The best locomotives D9-40CW, AC4400,
and SD70MAC. Maby you can beat the train...
Maby you are dead wrong Lets add Amtrak
to the list of favorite RR'S too.!!

Ham Radio call sign KC8ZFW

The Best Horn K5LA.!!

The Best Signal C&O Cantilever.!!

NS Pokey Dispatrcher to the 233 over.
Railroadman
Historian
Posts: 1035
Re: Dispatchers
 
« Reply #21 on: May 8th, 2005, 8:29am »
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I don't know if CSX does this or not but they probaly do. NS requires
their dispatchers to go out and Hirail the areas that they are going  
to be dispatching before they start working which I think is a very good idea.


Logged

The best locomotives D9-40CW, AC4400,
and SD70MAC. Maby you can beat the train...
Maby you are dead wrong Lets add Amtrak
to the list of favorite RR'S too.!!

Ham Radio call sign KC8ZFW

The Best Horn K5LA.!!

The Best Signal C&O Cantilever.!!

NS Pokey Dispatrcher to the 233 over.
Railroadman
Historian
Posts: 1035
Re: Dispatchers
 
« Reply #22 on: May 8th, 2005, 8:37am »
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Speaking of Dispatchers... I work part time as a EMS dispatcher.
Sure their is junk to put it nicely that you have to deal with
occasionally but for the most part I love my job.
 
As much as I would like to be a train dispatcher I'm not sure
if I could do it or not.


Logged

The best locomotives D9-40CW, AC4400,
and SD70MAC. Maby you can beat the train...
Maby you are dead wrong Lets add Amtrak
to the list of favorite RR'S too.!!

Ham Radio call sign KC8ZFW

The Best Horn K5LA.!!

The Best Signal C&O Cantilever.!!

NS Pokey Dispatrcher to the 233 over.
Pennsy
Historian
View Profile  

Posts: 4586
Re: Dispatchers
 
« Reply #23 on: May 8th, 2005, 10:39am »
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Hi EK,
 
I seem to remember several instances where tempers and /or demeanors were stretched when a brakeman or conductor had to request a movement from the dispatcher. They always come to some agreement. I also have seen dispatchers get into trouble with a train halted on every track awaiting clearance to move. By that time the dispatcher is on his second or third valium (midol )  
 
Needless to say, it is a rough job and yes you need to be aware of the BIG picture. You can't be in a little niche by yourself.


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Dyed in the wool PRR fan.
zwsplac
Historian
Posts: 938
Re: Dispatchers
 
« Reply #24 on: May 8th, 2005, 2:17pm »
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I love playing the Train Dispatcher game and it does give a good glimpse of what it's like. Very Stressful. You really have to think ahead. If you go on cruise control, you'll mess up a lot. While train watching, I've never seen a dispatcher make a crucial error to bring the line to a halt. In fact for the most part they've done a fine job. One of the most memorable dispatching performances was at Gibbon Nebraska, where 40 trains passed through in 6 hours, and NONE had to stop for other trains. Amazing!

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Editor of frograil.com's Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska Railfan Pages
Visit them at frograil.com

ek2179
TRAINing
Posts: 5
Re: Dispatchers
 
« Reply #25 on: May 10th, 2005, 12:21am »
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I would like to have been a fly on the wall at the PRR dispatcher's office that handled the NY-Washington main line in the 1920s.  Sure, you had a lot of tracks to work with, but the traffic was unbelievable.
 
Then consider the Lindbergh train.  After Lindy flew non-stop to Paris in 1925 or so, he was shipped back to Washington aboard a Navy Cruiser and met by the President with all the pomp that could be mustered, and that was a lot.  Of course, newsreel cameras were rolling, and there was competition among the companies to see who could get  their films shown in New York's Times Square first.  One company chartered an airplane to fly the films to NY where they'd be processed and sent to the newsreel theater.
 
Another company chartered a train on the Pennsy, consisting of an E6 4-4-2 and a baggage car fitted out as a darkroom, and a rider coach for braking.  The E6 set a new speed record from Washington to Manhattan Transfer and, since the films were developed enroute, they were shown in their theater long before those that were flown up there.
 
But the interesting thing from a dispatcher's point of view is that this special went right up the gut of the busiest railroad in the world, setting a new speed record, and was not delayed by any other train nor did it delay any other passenger train.
 
Think about that one!
 
ek2179


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George_Harris
Historian
Posts: 3824
Re: Dispatchers
 
« Reply #26 on: May 10th, 2005, 4:22am »
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on Mar 16th, 2005, 9:16pm, big_hack wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Computer Aided Dispatching.  

 
Notice the second word there:  "Aided" or if you want to be fanciesr, "Assisted"  That is, it can help, but that is all.  Computers DO NOT THINK.  Taht requires people.  The common saying is. Garbage in, garbage out.  Computers are great for repetetive tasks, so they would probably do well on a comuter type operation where all trains are of the same type iwth similar characteristics.  Just for example, if you have entered a 6,000 ton double stack allowed 70 mph with 3 good SD's on the front into the computer, and one of them fails, the computer will continue to plan based on what it was originally told in setting up meets and passes until you tell it differently, and everything will become a mess.  
 
Same applies with another CAD, Computer Aided Drafting.  Once I have the turnouts drawn up in detail, a multi-track interlocking does not take a lot of time to draw as a complete rail and tie layout.  You just set in the turnouts, flopping the cell for the turnout to get you left hand and right hand, and then set in the ties in the spaces between.  But, if you have one non-standard unit in there, you will spend more time drawing that one non-standard piece than it took to put the whole rest of it together.  
 
The people selling these systems have all kinds of little and big things in there that they can call up to make the system look impressive, but unless you like being lied to it is probably better not to ask how long it took to put each piece together.  
 
If you are doing a design where there is very little carry over between drawings and very little use of repetitive details, it will probably take MORE time to do the work in CAD than it would have to have done it by hand, even with pen and ink.  
 
OK I am getting somewhat OT, but the point is some management types seem to have confused computers with a form of magic.  They are great things, but only if used properly.  
 
George


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trainwatcher1100

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Posts: 2229
Re: Dispatchers
 
« Reply #27 on: May 10th, 2005, 6:07am »
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on May 10th, 2005, 12:21am, ek2179 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
...Then consider the Lindbergh train...the interesting thing from a dispatcher's point of view is that this special went right up the gut of the busiest railroad in the world, setting a new speed record, and was not delayed by any other train nor did it delay any other passenger train...

Amazing. Although videotape and satellites have made it unnecessary, replicating such a feat today is utterly unthinkable. And there was freight aplenty on the corridor in those days, too!
 
I gained new respect for the awesome work of those dispatchers when my nephew (granted, he's no seasoned dispatcher) tried and tried to run the Train Dispatcher simulator's Northeast Corridor route. It was so hard just to keep the passenger trains moving (and there must have been many more in 1925) that he could never even start the freights, and in no time flat the whole line would choke to a halt.
 
- Bob


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Railroadman
Historian
Posts: 1035
Re: Dispatchers
 
« Reply #28 on: Jul 27th, 2005, 10:11pm »
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I was listening to fostorialive.com the other night and I heard the CSX SC
dispatcher ask a train crew this question.
 
"Just to satisfy my curiosity, what's up with that car that's been in the siding there since Moby Dick was a minno?
 
He was not hateful it was just the way he asked that made it almost
downright funny.


Logged

The best locomotives D9-40CW, AC4400,
and SD70MAC. Maby you can beat the train...
Maby you are dead wrong Lets add Amtrak
to the list of favorite RR'S too.!!

Ham Radio call sign KC8ZFW

The Best Horn K5LA.!!

The Best Signal C&O Cantilever.!!

NS Pokey Dispatrcher to the 233 over.
BNSF_1088
Historian
Posts: 6029
Re: Dispatchers
 
« Reply #29 on: Jul 29th, 2005, 5:04pm »
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well i am trying to apply for a dispatcher positon in BNSF.

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BNSF Conductor

Director of
Save Our Trains Michigan


cmstpps
Chaser
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Posts: 63
Re: Dispatchers
 
« Reply #30 on: Jul 29th, 2005, 5:08pm »
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on Mar 14th, 2005, 11:48pm, UPConductor wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Our dispatchers rarely dispatch trains anymore.  They let CAD do the dispatching, and it sucks.  We are not a fan of dispatchers while we are on duty.

 
 
That's because the EwePee can't move a thing!!!!!


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cmstpps
Chaser
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Posts: 63
Re: Dispatchers
 
« Reply #31 on: Jul 29th, 2005, 5:11pm »
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on Jul 29th, 2005, 5:04pm, BNSF_1088 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
well i am trying to apply for a dispatcher positon in BNSF.

 
Bring 'er on we need a few more good men ! Since we are the only railroad the "can move your world"


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BNSF_1088
Historian
Posts: 6029
Re: Dispatchers
 
« Reply #32 on: Jul 29th, 2005, 5:11pm »
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Yep Thats Right

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BNSF Conductor

Director of
Save Our Trains Michigan


Railroadman
Historian
Posts: 1035
Re: Dispatchers
 
« Reply #33 on: Aug 29th, 2005, 2:36pm »
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Matt did you ever get a job dispatching??

Logged

The best locomotives D9-40CW, AC4400,
and SD70MAC. Maby you can beat the train...
Maby you are dead wrong Lets add Amtrak
to the list of favorite RR'S too.!!

Ham Radio call sign KC8ZFW

The Best Horn K5LA.!!

The Best Signal C&O Cantilever.!!

NS Pokey Dispatrcher to the 233 over.
Passenger_Extra
Historian
Posts: 1284
Re: Dispatchers
 
« Reply #34 on: Aug 29th, 2005, 7:10pm »
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on Jan 9th, 2005, 7:25pm, Fred wrote:       (Click here for original message)
There aren't many more jobs more stressful than that of a train dispatcher.  Many years ago when I lived in Ann Arbor the fellow living above my apartment & I became friends, he was an air traffic controller at Detroit Metro and I was a train dispatcher for Penn Central so we always kidded each other on which of us had the more stressful job ( I claimed mine simply because above everything else, I didn't know if the bank was going to cash my paycheck!!) Anyhow the    local paper did a study comparing the stress of a train dispr and the stress of an air traffic controller and the study revealed the train dispr's job WAS MORE STRESSFUL ! Now I don't know what airports or railroads they studied but I do know my friend didn't talk to me for a week!!
                         Speaking from experience (1968-198 I can tell you that a train dispr's job is no picnic. Dealing with  12 operators, 5 yardmasters, 6 different railroads and a ton of trains constantly leaves little time to go to the bathroom let alone grab something to eat. Between 2 or more radios, intercoms and the telephone you are constantly talking to somebody. While you're on one someone is calling you on another wondering why the hell you won't answer HIM! I got ulcers 3 years (age 23) after starting dispatching. If you ever get the chance to "sit in" at a dispr's office, TAKE IT, you'll be amazed on what he goes thru!  

 
Dispatching has to be right up there with air control for stress levels.  S'no wonder some of the old guys could get a little grouchy.
 
Famous quote from MO Pac dispatcher on hearing one of his trains passed a red on a single track main.:
 
"Well, . . . there's going to be wreck.    Jody, you better call the fire and police departments down there pronto."  
 
PX


« Last Edit: Aug 29th, 2005, 7:11pm by Passenger_Extra » Logged

Not good on trains 1, 2, 5, 6, 25 & 26 west of Washington D.C. and trains 27 & 28.
electro soundwave
Historian
Posts: 1984
Re: Dispatchers
 
« Reply #35 on: Aug 30th, 2005, 1:42am »
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Well we'll see how this goes. I am applying for a dispatch position with NS in the morning. I am nervous as hell becuase NS has been my dream company to work for since I was three so of course I'm being an insomniatic and posting on Railfan.

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SCL/L&N Family Lines
The Southern Serves The South
Passenger_Extra
Historian
Posts: 1284
Re: Dispatchers
 
« Reply #36 on: Aug 30th, 2005, 4:50pm »
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on May 8th, 2005, 10:39am, Pennsy wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Hi EK,
 
I seem to remember several instances where tempers and /or demeanors were stretched when a brakeman or conductor had to request a movement from the dispatcher. They always come to some agreement. I also have seen dispatchers get into trouble with a train halted on every track awaiting clearance to move. By that time the dispatcher is on his second or third valium (midol )  
 
Needless to say, it is a rough job and yes you need to be aware of the BIG picture. You can't be in a little niche by yourself.

 
 
 
Cute little quote stuck in my dad's old time book;
 
"here's to the conductor,
the master of his train
his head stuck in a phone box
his ass out in the rain".  
 
 
I guess he'd had a few of those conversations with dispatchers you refer to.
 
Hey I need to reverse a mile back here at B'ville to set out this hotbox!
 
Take it to G'town
 
Whatd'ya mean take it G'town, no way in hell!
 
Well is it on the main?
 
Its a train ain't it?" where the hell ya' think it is over here on Route 18!
 
 
Funny stuff to hear some of those old guys sometimes.
 
PX


« Last Edit: Aug 30th, 2005, 5:52pm by Passenger_Extra » Logged

Not good on trains 1, 2, 5, 6, 25 & 26 west of Washington D.C. and trains 27 & 28.
alcoc420
Historian
Posts: 338
Re: Dispatchers
 
« Reply #37 on: Aug 30th, 2005, 5:41pm »
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Recently i read somewhere that Dispatchers/Air trafffic controllers have the highest rate for suicide. Hey, George-Harris your familiar with CAD? Im currently taking classes for it in my high school.

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George_Harris
Historian
Posts: 3824
Re: Dispatchers
 
« Reply #38 on: Sep 1st, 2005, 11:44pm »
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My knowledge of CAD (drafting that is, not dispatching) is only the look over the shoulder and say I want it to look like thus and so.  My drawing table days ended before CAD was in use.  I am probably in that knowing just enough to be dangerous state.  I learned early on that you basically work upside down from the methods you use with pen or pencil.  That is, in CAD you develop the details and then turn them into or copy them into "cells" which are then strung together to make the whole drawing.  
 
Taking a normal turnout drawing for example:  Usually you have an overall layout showing rails and ties and then you have a switch area detail and a frog area detail.  You may then have a couple of sections through the frog and a section through the switch rail.  In pen and ink or in pencil you would work out the tie layout and draw it up, add rails, then throw on guard rails, lines to represent the frog casting and wings, use a couple of lines to represent switch rails, add dashed lines for the switch rods.  In CAD, you start with the smallest detail, develop the switch end detail drawing, the frog end detail drawing, then place them in the right relationship to each other and fill in the spaces between and beyond with rails and ties.  To create a crossover, take the turnout drawing, copy and rotate and fill in the space in between or modifiy the space in between in the overlap areas, which you do have on track centers under 16 feet.  In CAD, the long and heavy effor part is creating the details.  
 
George


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alcoc420
Historian
Posts: 338
Re: Dispatchers
 
« Reply #39 on: Sep 4th, 2005, 7:43pm »
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Yeah im pretty good on the drawing board and this year i will be getting familiar with the computers.

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