Railfan.net Home Railfan Photos ABPR Archives Staff Safari Photos Railfan Links

Railfan.net Forums Railfan.net Forums Railfan.net Forums
Welcome, Guest. Please Sign In or Register. Oct 22nd, 2017, 4:51pm
Categories •  FastIndex •  LongIndex •  Help •  Search •  Members  •  Sign In •  Register


Railroads scramble to fill job openings
   Railfan.net Web Forums
   The Mainline
   Railroading
(Moderators: CN5710, RobR)
   Railroads scramble to fill job openings
« Previous topic | Next topic »
Pages: 1  ReplyReply     EMail TopicEMail Topic   PrintPrint
   Author  Topic: Railroads scramble to fill job openings  (Read 603 times)
BNSF_1088
Historian
Posts: 6029
Railroads scramble to fill job openings
 
« on: Dec 15th, 2003, 10:54am »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

Railroads scramble to fill job openings  
RIVERSIDE, Calif. -- Rail yards in Colton, San Bernardino and throughout the country are seeing a massive turnover in staff as the nation's railroads scramble to replace retiring workers, according to this report by Adam Eventov that appeared in the Press-Enterprise.  
Union Pacific and Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroads together expect to hire more than 300 workers in the next year for their Inland Empire rail yards and more than 2,000 workers nationwide to replace a wave of retiring engineers, conductors and other employees, railroad officials said Friday.  
 
"You have an industry that is graying," said Tom White, spokesman for the Association of American Railroads, by phone from his Washington, D.C. office.  
 
Since January 2002, there has been a rush to retire by railroad workers, who are taking advantage of new retirement rules that allow them to get a full pension and benefits at age 60 after 30 years of service. Under the old rule, workers had to wait until they were 62 years old before they could retire with full benefits.  
 
"It has had a fairly significant impact on us," said Union Pacific spokesman John Bromley.  
 
Last year, the Omaha-based company hired 2,000 workers nationwide to replace retiring staff. The company expects to hire 2,200 in the first half of 2004, Bromley said. In Southern California, Union Pacific and Burlington Northern railroads employ about 1,300 workers.  
 
The changed retirement rules is only one reason for the loss of staff, said Bromley. The railroads, particularly in the West, have been hiring to replace retiring workers, but also to keep pace with the growth of intermodal cargo and an economy that bounced back stronger than the railroads anticipated.  
 
Intermodal traffic is when cargo containers, usually carrying consumer goods shipped from Asia, are put on rail cars and shipped to the rest of the country before being transferred to trucks and driven to their final destination.  
 
Some historical influences have also led to the wave of retirements.  
 
In the 1980s, railroads began restructuring and cutting their workforce. In the early 1980s, the industry employed about a half-million workers; now it employs fewer than 200,000, he said.  
 
Those that survived the cuts typically were older workers who had more seniority than those who were laid off, White said.  
 
For more information about railroad jobs, visit the Union Pacific or Burlington Northern Santa Fe websites at www.UP.com or at www.BNSF.com  
 
(The preceding report by Adam Eventov appeared in the Press-Enterprise Monday, Dec. 15, 2003.)  
 
December 15, 2003  


Logged

BNSF Conductor

Director of
Save Our Trains Michigan


keithsy
Enthusiast
View Profile  

Posts: 27
Re: Railroads scramble to fill job openings
 
« Reply #1 on: Mar 10th, 2008, 3:30pm »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

on Dec 15th, 2003, 10:54am, BNSF_1088 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Railroads scramble to fill job openings  
RIVERSIDE, Calif. -- Rail yards in Colton, San Bernardino and throughout the country are seeing a massive turnover in staff as the nation's railroads scramble to replace retiring workers, according to this report by Adam Eventov that appeared in the Press-Enterprise.  
Union Pacific and Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroads together expect to hire more than 300 workers in the next year for their Inland Empire rail yards and more than 2,000 workers nationwide to replace a wave of retiring engineers, conductors and other employees, railroad officials said Friday.  
 
"You have an industry that is graying," said Tom White, spokesman for the Association of American Railroads, by phone from his Washington, D.C. office.  
 
Since January 2002, there has been a rush to retire by railroad workers, who are taking advantage of new retirement rules that allow them to get a full pension and benefits at age 60 after 30 years of service. Under the old rule, workers had to wait until they were 62 years old before they could retire with full benefits.  
 
"It has had a fairly significant impact on us," said Union Pacific spokesman John Bromley.  
 
Last year, the Omaha-based company hired 2,000 workers nationwide to replace retiring staff. The company expects to hire 2,200 in the first half of 2004, Bromley said. In Southern California, Union Pacific and Burlington Northern railroads employ about 1,300 workers.  
 
The changed retirement rules is only one reason for the loss of staff, said Bromley. The railroads, particularly in the West, have been hiring to replace retiring workers, but also to keep pace with the growth of intermodal cargo and an economy that bounced back stronger than the railroads anticipated.  
 
Intermodal traffic is when cargo containers, usually carrying consumer goods shipped from Asia, are put on rail cars and shipped to the rest of the country before being transferred to trucks and driven to their final destination.  
 
Some historical influences have also led to the wave of retirements.  
 
In the 1980s, railroads began restructuring and cutting their workforce. In the early 1980s, the industry employed about a half-million workers; now it employs fewer than 200,000, he said.  
 
Those that survived the cuts typically were older workers who had more seniority than those who were laid off, White said.  
 
For more information about railroad jobs, visit the Union Pacific or Burlington Northern Santa Fe websites at www.UP.com or at www.BNSF.com  
 
(The preceding report by Adam Eventov appeared in the Press-Enterprise Monday, Dec. 15, 2003.)  
 
December 15, 2003  

 
They are desperate now. They cannot discriminate for race, color creed, sex, religion, marital status, etc. Neither can they hire their friends. Also, the new prospects do not have a work ethic and their bodies was dirty with drugs.


Logged
gp80mac
Historian
Posts: 303
Re: Railroads scramble to fill job openings
 
« Reply #2 on: Mar 15th, 2008, 6:03pm »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

Let's see...
 
No real schedule.  No days off you can plan on.  Never knowing when you will be bumped.  Never knowing how much you will make from one week to the next.  Never knowing when to sleep or when to wake up.  Working for managers that have never thrown a switch in their life, but are all too happy to write you up for the same.  Showing up for a road train and having to do 6 hours of yardwork that isn't your job.  HAving to work out of offices and locomotives that should be condemned.   Being expected to work fast and safe (an oxymoron).  
 
And they complain because they can't attract quality applicants?  Wonder why.  Anyone with a lick of sense will stay away from this circus.  And I hope my end is near as well.  Just isn't worth it.


Logged

~ gp80mac ~

All of my posts are my opinion ONLY, and do not reflect the opinion of any company, railroad, organization, or other person.
Bob_Jennings
TRAINing
Posts: 3
Re: Railroads scramble to fill job openings
 
« Reply #3 on: Mar 15th, 2008, 9:21pm »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

No set work schedule, never knowing when you go out to work when you get back, not knowing if you will be sent to a decent hotel when your rest period begins,  on and on.  In the 80's when the RR's cut so many people off when reducing crew sizes, they cut off many people who were in love with the job---but didn't have the senority to stay on.  Now, the RR's can't find people who will put up with the crap that management puts out.

Logged
1oldgoat
TRAINing
Posts: 23
Re: Railroads scramble to fill job openings
 
« Reply #4 on: Apr 25th, 2008, 12:04am »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

After 33 years on the BN(SF) and more than my share of battles with management as a union rep, I believe these companies don't deserve good employees.  However, railroading is a noble profession and a would hate to see it lose their chance to become releavent again.  So when people ask me about hiring out, I tell them the truth about all the BS they'll be dealing with and let hem decide for themselves.
 
If the carriers don't learn how to treat their employees with dignity and respect, they won't last, and maybe some folks who do know how to attract and keep good people will pick up the pieces.  My guess is that with about half the workforce becoming eligible for retirement within the next 6-8 years, things will come to a head real soon!  
 
I retired last year, and couldn't be happier.  Although I must say that railroaders are the nicest bunch of folks you could ever work with.  Sure, there are a few a-holes, but you'll find that everywhere.  The only thing I miss are my "brothers", and we stay in touch.  And I gotta say, I had a lot of fun though the years!


Logged
cop39fl
TRAINing
Posts: 1
Re: Railroads scramble to fill job openings
 
« Reply #5 on: Jan 30th, 2009, 8:53pm »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

I should send the indiana harbor belt railroad a letter of thank you for
 
laying me off in 1982, and then for terminating me in 1985 after a call back,
 
i spent 25 years as a police officer in florida and eligible to fully retire at age 48.


Logged
Hyrailer
Railfan
Posts: 120
Re: Railroads scramble to fill job openings
 
« Reply #6 on: Feb 28th, 2009, 5:13pm »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

With the bad economy are the big railroads still hiring?


Logged
Railfan Entertainments
Historian
Posts: 2980
Re: Railroads scramble to fill job openings
 
« Reply #7 on: Feb 28th, 2009, 5:56pm »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

Last time I heard, no, they are not hiring.

Logged



www.youtube.com/user/railfanentertainment
gp80mac
Historian
Posts: 303
Re: Railroads scramble to fill job openings
 
« Reply #8 on: Mar 1st, 2009, 8:00pm »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

Amtrak is still hiring some people.  The class 1 freight roads aren't.  Most of them are furloughing people left and right.   Summer vacations and the new hours of service law may help get some of those people back, but don't look for massive hiring unless the economy picks up.  I'm sure it will in time, but until then...
 


Logged

~ gp80mac ~

All of my posts are my opinion ONLY, and do not reflect the opinion of any company, railroad, organization, or other person.
Fred
Railfan
Posts: 151
Re: Railroads scramble to fill job openings
 
« Reply #9 on: Mar 2nd, 2009, 1:41pm »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

Class 1's in the East laying T&E people, 1.200 on the CSXT & around 1,600 on NS. Conrail's CEO & President doing his best to not layoff any CR T&E employees. With the economy being in the mess its in, lot less trains operating these days means a lot less employees needed to run them.

Logged
NS_conductor
Historian
Posts: 273
Re: Railroads scramble to fill job openings
 
« Reply #10 on: May 6th, 2009, 8:18pm »
Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify

on Mar 2nd, 2009, 1:41pm, Fred wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Class 1's in the East laying T&E people, 1.200 on the CSXT & around 1,600 on NS. Conrail's CEO & President doing his best to not layoff any CR T&E employees. With the economy being in the mess its in, lot less trains operating these days means a lot less employees needed to run them.

 
Whats left of Actual CR probably cant afford to lay any off.That and NS has management trying to justify their jobs by hammering crews for every little thing it seems.


Logged

M.A. Payne
On cable TV they have a weather channel -- 24 hours of weather. We had something like that where I grew up. We called it a window.
Pages: 1  ReplyReply     EMail TopicEMail Topic   PrintPrint

« Previous topic | Next topic »