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A better photo.
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DODX
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A better photo.
  Picture_007.jpg - 110811 Bytes
« on: Aug 6th, 2013, 6:01pm »
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Hello everyone I am just a young railfan getting into the hobby and I was how I could take a better photo. My camera is a Panasonic PV-GS39 digital camera. Here is one of my photos taken in Lowellville,OH please give me tips on how I could improve my photos,thanks!

http://Forums.Railfan.net/Images/Photo/Picture_007.jpg
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CHESSIEMIKE
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Re: A better photo.
 
« Reply #1 on: Aug 8th, 2013, 6:05am »
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First off, what do you not like about it? If you had the chance, what would you do different to get a better photo?
CHESSIEMIKE


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Remember that a lone amateur built the Ark. A large group of professionals built the Titanic.
Les_Shepherd
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Re: A better photo.
 
« Reply #2 on: Aug 10th, 2013, 5:56am »
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Here is my observation.
 
The background appears to be brighter than the subject. Auto exposure reads an AVERAGE of the light. For the subject to be brighter you need to adjust the camera aperture setting, for this image probably about half a stop.
 
I am not familiar with your camera and whether or not this is possible. You should read the camera manual on how to make such adjustments. There can be several ways depending on the camera.
 
With backlit subjects in making an aperture adjustment the usual result will be to burn out (overexpose) the background. This is ok because you are photographing a subject and not the background.


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DODX
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Re: A better photo.
 
« Reply #3 on: Aug 10th, 2013, 9:49pm »
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Well CHESSIEMIKE in some other photos I've seen the headlight does not look so bright and the whole photo is just a little brighter in a way. Also another question about photos rail pictures.net photos sometimes have train ID's on them how would I find that out.

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TAB
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Re: A better photo.
 
« Reply #4 on: Aug 11th, 2013, 8:40pm »
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Not being knowledgeable with the camera you were using, I did a Google search with the model number you provided hoping it would turn up something useful....and it did in a way. Apparently you are using a mini, digital camcorder. Based on the the Google information, the quality of image you posted is about as good as you can expect with that camera under the lighting conditions that existed. If you are interested in still pictures it would be best to use a regular digital camera as it will give you more options to deal with poor lighting conditions such as were present for the illustration you provided.....Tom

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HwyHaulier
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Re: A better photo.
 
« Reply #5 on: Aug 12th, 2013, 6:35am »
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DODX - Tom - All -  
 
We haven't quite established photo conditions at time and place of instant Photo, have we? To look at it on my computer screen,  
the Photo hints done on a gray overcast day? Also, other implied issues: Was shutter speed quick enough? Too, question whether  
detail and resolution of the Photo pushed the actual design limits of the camera?
 
Tom passes along some sound advice. What is also helpful to it. Use care in consideration of use of a reasonably priced "point  
and shoot". Many of these offered at (more or less) one hundred dollars or so. They are competent, but aren't quite good enough  
with a great deal of Photo situations. Moral, I guess? The workman is only as good as his tools?
 
...............................Vern..........................


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DODX
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Re: A better photo.
 
« Reply #6 on: Aug 13th, 2013, 1:21pm »
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Okay a interesting point I suppose my camera isn't the best for this kind of work. Again I am only a young railfan (13) I probably could use my mom's camera sometimes.

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CHESSIEMIKE
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Re: A better photo.
 
« Reply #7 on: Aug 13th, 2013, 7:00pm »
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on Aug 13th, 2013, 1:21pm, DODX wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Okay a interesting point I suppose my camera isn't the best for this kind of work. Again I am only a young railfan (13) I probably could use my mom's camera sometimes.

Yes, the. quality of your photos will be effected by your equipment. But there are a lot of things you can do to make sure you get the best photo possible. Look at your photos with a critical eye. What do you like and what do you not like in each one. You mentioned the overall photo is to bright. Could it have been overexposed? If so how can you prevent that on future shots. Looks to me like this photo was taken on an overcast day. Not much you can do about that. You might want to look on line or find a book about photography. Continue to learn and you will get shots you will hate less.
You asked about symbols. You can use a scanner to hear the crew call the signals, or you might be able to figure it out by looking on line and seeing what trains go by on the tracks in your area.  
I hope this helps.
CHESSIEMIKE


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HwyHaulier
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Re: A better photo.
 
« Reply #8 on: Aug 14th, 2013, 12:16pm »
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DODX - ChessieMike - All -
 
Chessie Mike added some to the point and practical tips and hints. Once, way back in another age, I was thirteen years of age,  
and enjoyed cameras.  
 
Photography, in large part, is every much learning by doing. Some good books are most helpful. So are the classic, old camera  
stores, with opportunities to meet up with seasoned hands. The owners have been known to offer very good deals on some fine  
used cameras, too.
 
Any advice? Use the camera you have as much as you can, so to put yourself "in tune" with what it can and cannot do. We did  
the Bad, Old Days, when we were running film stock, and often quirky cameras with mechanical shutters. On at least two of my  
cameras, I needed to consider air temperature at moment of use. The shutters could act a bit slowly in the cold.
 
Today, users are so far ahead of the game because images stored to high capacity memory chips. Used to be we had to buy film,  
and processing. So, those of us with limited money to spend would tend to be stingy on how many Photos we captured. Present  
day "Edit" programs on computer are a wonder, too...
 
..............................Vern......................


« Last Edit: Aug 14th, 2013, 12:36pm by HwyHaulier » Logged

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photoman475
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Re: A better photo.
 
« Reply #9 on: Nov 9th, 2013, 10:31am »
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DODX:
 
Welcome to the wonderful world of photography!
 
The previous advice is spot on for you.  It's taking photos and learning from them.
 
Here's something else to do.  Go to your local public library and look for an easy to understand book on photography.  At your age-and I started with a 127 camera back in the mid-1960s-it will be hard to understand some of the terms at first.  I had that trouble, and it wasn't until I got started on the high school yearbook staff and could learn at their expense how to take photos with a decent 35mm camera.  If your school offers a photo class, even if it's film, take it if you can!  Many of the terms are interchangeable, and better yet, all of the principles of photography are the same.  This is a point people fail to understand!  Film or digital, light is light and doesn't change whether it's a film camera or a digital one!
 
The holiday season is coming and perhaps you might get some money or gift cards as presents.  Perhaps you can use these to purchase a digital camera-even a used one would be better than an digital camcorder.  READ THE INSTRUCTION MANUAL.  
 
You have an advantage that us older folks like Vern and I didn't have in film days-the digital stores the metadata of the camera settings when the photo was taken.  Look at that info, and with time and experience, you will be able to understand what that means and how to use that info to get a better photo the next time you're in a similar situation.
 
Good luck to you in photography.
 
Alan
 


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