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Storing Slides
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   Author  Topic: Storing Slides  (Read 178 times)
toddsyr

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Storing Slides
 
« on: Mar 20th, 2013, 9:21pm »
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I recently bought my first railroad slide. It says Kodakchrome on the slide. Since I paid $34 for it I would like it to last awhile. What's the best way to store it after I have prints made from it? Any help is appreciated.
 
Todd K Stearns


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photoman475
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Re: Storing Slides
 
« Reply #1 on: Mar 21st, 2013, 10:27pm »
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Todd:
 
Kodachrome is the greatest slide film ever sold.  Nothing else comes close!  Unfortunately, it is no longer made, nor is processing of it available.  The last Kodachrome was processed on 12/31/10 at Dwyane's in Parsons, Kansas.  They were the last official processor in the world.
 
Now, for preserving the slide, you have a bit of a problem, since you only have one.
Normally, I'd say to get a package of Clear-Vue slides protector sheets and one of the plastic storage boxes for protecting a large group of slides.  The slide protector sheets are for storing 20 slides each, if they are 35mm slides, 12 slides if medium format.
 
If you are planning on buying more slides, then that may still be a viable option.  I need to think for a bit for what to do if you're never going to have more than a few.  I'll PM you when I come up with something.
 
One thing I would very strongly recommend doing is when you get the prints made that you want, also get them to make a CD of the slide.  
 
Alan
 
 
 


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HwyHaulier
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Re: Storing Slides
 
« Reply #2 on: Mar 22nd, 2013, 7:41am »
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Alan - Todd -
 
Over the years, KODACHROME images remarkably stable. More than can be said for some other color media of the era.
 
There must be a body of published thought on care of venerable KODACHROME images. IMHO, ideally it seems the aging  
slides and negatives ought to be in climate controlled environment. I can't think of a practical method, for smaller groups of  
work, than a Bank Safe Deposit box. Too, the gloomy reality? Nothing is forever!
 
............................Vern.........................


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toddsyr

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Re: Storing Slides
 
« Reply #3 on: Mar 22nd, 2013, 7:15pm »
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Thanks for the info guys. A slide protector box and the protective sheets sounds like a good idea. I figured there had to be something like that.  
 
Our home is relatively stable as far as temperature and humidity are concerned. Nothing too extreme with either. Still, a CD backup is a good idea for slides. Then they can be transferred to a hard drive too I imagine.  
 
I'll probably buy a few more slides over the years, not too many though. The one I already bought depicts the Skaneateles Shortline Railroad. This was a small line that ran not far from my hometown. It's things like that I would want slides of.  
 
Todd K Stearns


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one87th
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Re: Storing Slides
 
« Reply #4 on: Mar 23rd, 2013, 2:01am »
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Todd,
 
The biggest factors affecting slide life are light, heat and moisture. Keep slides out of direct light (especially sunlight), avoid excessive heat (don't store in an attic or garage), and avoid moisture/high humidity or physically touching the film which can encourage fungus growth.
 
Properly stored Kodachromes should be good for at least 50-100 years. Some of the older films, Ektachrome and Agfachrome in particular, have less stable dyes which tend to deteriorate over time. The cyan dye layer was least stable, with its breakdown leading to fading and a color shift.
 
The advice to have the slide digitally scanned is an excellent idea, and any color shift can be corrected in the digital file.


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toddsyr

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Re: Storing Slides
 
« Reply #5 on: Mar 23rd, 2013, 10:24pm »
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I appreciate the input one87th. It does look like there's  a small fingerprint or something on the slide. What's the best way to wipe that off of there?
 
Todd K Stearns


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one87th
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Re: Storing Slides
 
« Reply #6 on: Mar 27th, 2013, 9:02pm »
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on Mar 23rd, 2013, 10:24pm, toddsyr wrote:       (Click here for original message)
I appreciate the input one87th. It does look like there's  a small fingerprint or something on the slide. What's the best way to wipe that off of there?
 
Todd K Stearns

 
Todd,
 
For a slide as old as old, valuable and irreplaceable as the one you have, I would have it digitally scanned first. Then use a commercial film cleaner (important that it is made for film and does not contain water) to moisten a lint-free cotton or microfiber cloth and gently rub to remove the fingerprint. You do not want to rub hard and risk damaging the emulsion. You can use a can of compressed gas to remove any dust.
 
Both the dust and film cleaner are available at any good photo store. If you take the slide there to be scanned, they should be able to clean it for you.


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firstbelt
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Re: Storing Slides
  slides01.jpg - 107922 Bytes
« Reply #7 on: Mar 27th, 2013, 10:50pm »
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on Mar 27th, 2013, 9:02pm, one87th wrote:       (Click here for original message)

 
...
 
Both the dust and film cleaner are available at any good photo store. ...

 
I would agree with one87th.  I'm scanning my slide collection, and often have to deal with dust and occasional finger prints.  Kodachrome is a bit more durable than Ektachrome and others that use dyes to generate colors.  I use a nice, clean cotton handkerchief, if I just have a small spot of finger oils.  You can get a soft artist's paintbrush from an art supply store, like camel hair, to remove dust.
 
Slides usually came with cardboard mounts, in a box that would hold 24 or 36 slides.  If the mount warps from heat or moisture, you can open up the cardboard sandwich and insert the film in a plastic mount (if you can find any).  The cardboard box from processing is one way to store slides, if you received them after processing.


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firstbelt
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Re: Storing Slides
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« Reply #8 on: Mar 27th, 2013, 10:56pm »
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Anyone who planned on showing slides with a projector used the trays from the manufacturer of the particular system.  Kodak Carousel trays were handy, but not very efficient way to store a large number of slides.

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firstbelt
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Re: Storing Slides
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« Reply #9 on: Mar 27th, 2013, 11:00pm »
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You might be able to find plastic sheets for a standard binder to hold a dozen or so slides per sheet.  I shot black&white negatives and store them in similar plastic sheets.  If you go that direction, make sure the plastic is safe for film storage.

http://Forums.Railfan.net/Images/Photo/slides04.jpg
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firstbelt
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Re: Storing Slides
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« Reply #10 on: Mar 27th, 2013, 11:06pm »
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I ended up with several thousand slides, and processed many of my own with Kodak's Ektachrome E-4 kit.  I re-used the box for slide storage, making trays to fit inside, two per box.  I can store around 1800 slides per box this way.  Referring back to the original question, I think keeping them this way since the 1970's has helped preserve the dyes.

http://Forums.Railfan.net/Images/Photo/slides03.jpg
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Les_Shepherd
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Re: Storing Slides
 
« Reply #11 on: Mar 30th, 2013, 6:36am »
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For some time I have been gradually scanning my transparencies. There are several thousand of them taken over a 25 year period. They are all Kodachrome or Ektachrome and were processed commercially.
 
About 90% of them are stored in either timber or plastic boxes which close tightly. All are stored in a cupboard in a storage unit, away from light and dust although subject to the seasonal changes in temperatures. They have survived very well.
 
Recently I took some scanned images of 40 years old slides and had prints produced at a print shop. The results were excellent.
 
I agree with the above posts that keeping them under the most stable and dust free conditions as possible is the best treatment.
 
I intend to copy the scanned images to DVD discs for added storage safety.
 
My next exercise will be to scan my colour negatives. These have not been so well stored.


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toddsyr

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Re: Storing Slides
 
« Reply #12 on: Mar 30th, 2013, 8:09pm »
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I appreciate everyone's input, it's all very helpful. For now I keep the slide in the small stiff envelope it came in. When I get a chance I'll get it scanned, have prints made and have it put onto a disc. First I have to finish paying off this months train purchases. For long term storage I'll get a box for slides as previously mentioned. I'll probably never have a lot of slides so that's the way to go I guess.
 
I contacted the guy I bought it from about legal ownership and such. I bought the original slide. not a copy. He said I can what i want with it legally as long as it's not for financial gain since the original photographer wrote his name on the slide case. I have to wonder, how did the guy on EBay sell it to me if it wasn't for financial gain? Did he sell it for less than he paid for it, LOL?  
 
Todd K Stearns


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photoman475
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Re: Storing Slides
 
« Reply #13 on: Mar 30th, 2013, 9:31pm »
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Todd:
 
I'd be interested to know exactly what the seller had in mind when he said that to you.  Legally, the copyright belongs to the original photographer.  If he sold the slide, or died and his family sold it, then I'm not sure how the law reads for copyright purposes.
 
If you get the slide published somewhere, then you would credit the photo as John Doe photograph, Todd Sterns collection.  This is because you didn't actually take the photo, but it is in your collection.
 
Have a good one.
 
Alan


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George_Harris
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Re: Storing Slides
 
« Reply #14 on: Mar 31st, 2013, 12:29am »
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on Mar 30th, 2013, 8:09pm, toddsyr wrote:       (Click here for original message)
I contacted the guy I bought it from about legal ownership and such. I bought the original slide. not a copy. He said I can what i want with it legally as long as it's not for financial gain since the original photographer wrote his name on the slide case. I have to wonder, how did the guy on EBay sell it to me if it wasn't for financial gain? Did he sell it for less than he paid for it, LOL?  
 
Todd K Stearns

I am not a lawyer nor do I play one on TV, however, if he had the right to sell it, that would have meant he owned it, regardless of whose name was on the slide case.  If he did not own it, that would mean he had no right to sell it, but is selling stolen property.  (Can I sell my neighbor's house or car?)  If he did not put the "not for financial gain" condition on the sale of the item at the time he put it up for sale, he can't change the terms after the sale went through, so he can't tell you that now.  
 
Photoman475 said it right.  That way you give credit to the original photographer for his work.  Even if not a necessity it is a very basic courtesy to recognize the work of the actual producer and not appear to be taking credit for it yourself.


« Last Edit: Mar 31st, 2013, 12:30am by George_Harris » Logged
toddsyr

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Re: Storing Slides
 
« Reply #15 on: Mar 31st, 2013, 1:42am »
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Hi George, thanks for your thoughts on this matter. I would say I have to agree with what you and Alan have said about this. It rings true with what I have heard elsewhere about photographic legalities.  
 
I would like to say that I didn't buy this slide hoping to somehow profit from it. I simply wanted to know how much of it I actually own. Reason being I would like to make a couple of prints from it for friends of mine. For their own personal use only of course.  
 
"John Doe photograph, Todd Sterns collection". Yep, I can see the point in that and agree with it wholeheartedly.  
 
"Even if not a necessity it is a very basic courtesy to recognize the work of the actual producer and not appear to be taking credit for it yourself."
 
The world could certainly use a bit more basic courtesy and I'm not afraid to help out with that at all. I also firmly believe in giving credit where credit is due. Where would we be now if it weren't for the the photographers of the past? A big thanks to all who have the foresight to record today what someday others will only wonder about. I'm tired, I hope that came out okay.  
 
Todd K Stearns


« Last Edit: Mar 31st, 2013, 1:43am by toddsyr » Logged

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