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   Author  Topic: RailPictures.net  (Read 2825 times)
Charlie_O
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Re: RailPictures.net
 
« Reply #160 on: Jul 30th, 2008, 3:23pm »

on Jul 30th, 2008, 2:25pm, VaPennsyFan wrote:       (Click here for original message)
I just had this photo rejected for bad cropping. . . any suggestions?
 
Jon

 
Jon-
First let me say that I like the photo. But I've had enough photos rejected over there to know a little about the way the screeners look at an image.  
1. Your subject is centered...they prefer the 'rule of thirds'. In other words, they'd rather see entire the caboose at left and crop out the picnic table at right.  
2. The cropping is a little snug along the bottom.  
 
These are just my suggestions, and of course there are no guarantees of acceptance. If you look at RP.net member "Charlie O", you'll see that I have about 120 pix over there. What they don't tell you is that I have about 700 rejections.
 
Good luck.
-Charlie


« Last Edit: Jul 30th, 2008, 3:24pm by Charlie_O » Logged

Some days, the most interesting person you meet is a river with a train running beside it.
RobR
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Re: RailPictures.net
 
« Reply #161 on: Jul 30th, 2008, 7:14pm »

I'm afraid I can't offer you any hope here, unless there's more on the original image that you cut off before submitting it to RP.net.  I agree with them on this one.  There should be some room between the caboose and the left edge, and there should be a bit more room on the bottom.
 
In general, it pays to get a wider angle than you really think you need so you can crop to your taste later.  You can't put what you left out of the original back in later.
 
RobR


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EMTRailfan
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Re: RailPictures.net
 
« Reply #162 on: Jul 31st, 2008, 8:44am »

I agree with Charlie and Rob.  To jump in a little deeper on the caboose, RP tends to not like trains cut off by the edge of a photo's frame.  Always try to have a natural object to "cut" the train if it needs done like a brush line, a building, or the train cutting itself rounding a curve, etc.

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VaPennsyFan
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Posts: 481
Re: RailPictures.net
 
« Reply #163 on: Jul 31st, 2008, 5:36pm »

Thanks for the feedback!
 
Jon


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NS CAMP

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Re: RailPictures.net
 
« Reply #164 on: Aug 4th, 2008, 12:43am »

Everyone: forget about Railpictures.net! Who are they to tell you what to shoot with your camera on your time? Shoot for you, and you only!  
 


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RobR
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Re: RailPictures.net
 
« Reply #165 on: Aug 8th, 2008, 12:30pm »

I just removed a post that contained an image whose copyright was not owned by the author of the post.  Please do not post pictures unless you are the owner of the copyright or you have permission of the owner.  
 
I tried just to remove the image and leave the rest of the post, which made a valid point, but I was not successful.  The original author is urged to repost it without the picture.
 
RobR, forum moderator


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EastPennVideos
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Re: RailPictures.net
 
« Reply #166 on: Aug 8th, 2008, 5:26pm »

I've tried to upload my video's on rail video a few times every time they claim that they are copyrighted. I can't figure out how they can say that, when I'm the one who took the video.
 
Eric


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RobR
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Re: RailPictures.net
 
« Reply #167 on: Aug 9th, 2008, 10:33pm »

on Aug 4th, 2008, 12:43am, Copper Still wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Everyone: forget about Railpictures.net! Who are they to tell you what to shoot with your camera on your time? Shoot for you, and you only!  

 
I have heard this many times, and I have mixed feelings about it.  Yes, you should shoot what you like and what makes you happy.  But if you only shoot for yourself, are you going to improve?  Showing your work on forums like RP.Net, or posting it here, or on a photo critique site like PhotoSIG.com (an excellent site, by the way) can help you become a better photographer by getting other people's viewpoints about your work.  Sometimes, it hurts, like the blunt rejections you get from RP.net, but sometimes you learn things.  
 
RobR


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VaPennsyFan
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Re: RailPictures.net
 
« Reply #168 on: Aug 9th, 2008, 11:37pm »

Here's my latest rejection . . . too soft.  Any suggestions?
 
http://www.railpictures.net/viewreject.php?id=559641&key=219342516


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VaPennsyFan
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Re: RailPictures.net
 
« Reply #169 on: Aug 10th, 2008, 2:41pm »

I finally got 2 photos accepted!  
 
<A HREF="http://www.railpictures.net/showphotos.php?userid=22578">Click Here</A> to view my photos at RailPictures.Net!


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RobR
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Re: RailPictures.net
 
« Reply #170 on: Aug 10th, 2008, 5:06pm »

on Aug 9th, 2008, 11:37pm, VaPennsyFan wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Here's my latest rejection . . . too soft.  Any suggestions?
 
http://www.railpictures.net/viewreject.php?id=559641&key=219342516

 
Well, obviously you answered your own question, since a sharper version of the picture got accepted.  So, how did you sharpen it?
 
RobR


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VaPennsyFan
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Re: RailPictures.net
 
« Reply #171 on: Aug 10th, 2008, 5:17pm »

on Aug 10th, 2008, 5:06pm, RobR wrote:       (Click here for original message)

 
Well, obviously you answered your own question, since a sharper version of the picture got accepted.  So, how did you sharpen it?
 
RobR

 
I just used the sharpen command in PhotoShop Elements.
 
Jon


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NS CAMP

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Re: RailPictures.net
 
« Reply #172 on: Aug 12th, 2008, 10:30am »

on Aug 9th, 2008, 10:33pm, RobR wrote:       (Click here for original message)

 
I have heard this many times, and I have mixed feelings about it.  Yes, you should shoot what you like and what makes you happy.  But if you only shoot for yourself, are you going to improve?  Showing your work on forums like RP.Net, or posting it here, or on a photo critique site like PhotoSIG.com (an excellent site, by the way) can help you become a better photographer by getting other people's viewpoints about your work.  Sometimes, it hurts, like the blunt rejections you get from RP.net, but sometimes you learn things.  
 
RobR

 
 
Well, there is such a thing as books and magazines that feature railroad photographs. I studied quality photographs and made note of desirable elements. I taught myself how to photograph trains, beginning with a 110 (15mm) point-and-shoot camera, and I now use professional Nikon film cameras. Each train, locomotive, and image was an opportunity to learn and perfect my skill. I learned how to release the shutter with perfect timing--not too early or late, because zooming and cropping is not really an option when shooting film images. So, yes, I shot from myself, and I greatly improved my photography skills without critiquing from Railpictures.net--as did all of the great railroad photographers from previous generations!
 
Digital cameras allow people to ignore composition and shoot virtually anything, because of the idea that mistakes can be corrected later through photo editing. However, editing will never take the place of good composition and taste. I'm happy shooting quality images for myself, not Railpictures.net.  
 
Although I have some photos on the internet, I should probably take them down so the copyrights are not infringed by some teenage railfan who thinks everything on the internet is free to copy and plagiarize. Furthermore, posting images on the internet can devalue them for any possible use in publications. Hence, I think people should calm down about Railpictures.net; why care if they don't want your photos? You may be better off in the long run.
 


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silver_champion
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Posts: 888
Re: RailPictures.net
 
« Reply #173 on: Aug 16th, 2008, 11:25am »

I have posted a statememt about seeing the same spot and type of train and it is no longer here. It was about CSX trains on the 30St. bypass.
We have been seeing picturese over and over at the same spot. Some
of for some reason can't get our pictures posted. Who ever took my post
off. THIS IS AMERICA 2008 NOT GERMANY 1940S. Freedom of speech is
still here.


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DLWJohn
Railfan
Posts: 184
Re: RailPictures.net
 
« Reply #174 on: Aug 16th, 2008, 2:45pm »

Quote:
Digital cameras allow people to ignore composition and shoot virtually anything, because of the idea that mistakes can be corrected later through photo editing. However, editing will never take the place of good composition and taste. I'm happy shooting quality images for myself, not Railpictures.net.

 
I couldnt agree more! Also one of the many reasons I will never own/use a digital camera as my main camera.


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VaPennsyFan
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Posts: 481
Re: RailPictures.net
 
« Reply #175 on: Aug 16th, 2008, 5:57pm »

Let me preface anything else I am about to say by stating that, first and foremost, I take pictures of what I like for my own pleasure, and not for the purpose of getting approval from RP.net or any other site.
 
Now, having said that, part of the reason I tried to get some pictures posted on RP.net is to get a sense of what others might consider a good image.  That doesn't mean I agree with them when they reject an image.  Also,  the fact that I use a digital camera doesn't mean that I just take photos willy-nilly to crop and fiddle with  later.  The fact that I'm using Photoshop Elements 2.0 should tell you how much I use photo editing software.
 
Now, for those who are quick to criticize digital photo editing, tell me exactly what the difference is between digitally cropping a photo and cropping and printing from a negative?  Or adjusting exposure digitally as opposed to pushing during the file developing process?  It's just a different tool for a different medium.  Professional photographers using film cameras may shoot a hundred frames for a single usable shot.  The only difference in doing that with digital is you can erase and re-use the film for the shots you didn't like.
 
Now, a photo-happy amateur with a point-and-shoot film camera will also go out and shoot anything without regard to composition.  I don't really think digital makes a serious photographer any more likely to ignore composition.
 
Now, a question for Copper Still - you say you greatly improved the composition of your photos without any feedback from RP.net, as did all sorts of photographers before.  Fine.  Did you get feedback from anyone at all?  Did you ever take any account of anyone else's feedback?
 
In a broader sense, what is the difference between submitting a photograph to RP.net and getting it rejected, and submitting a photograph to Railpace, or Trains, or whatever and having it rejected?  Do the magazines give feedback when they don't like your pictures?  Or do they just send your pics back without comment?  Which is more useful to the photographer?


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silver_champion
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Posts: 888
Re: RailPictures.net
 
« Reply #176 on: Aug 17th, 2008, 10:40am »

I would like to say that the pictures that I have been taking about is a bad
picture, they are very good pictures. But give other who like others to
see something else. Philadelphia area is a great spot for railroading. The
history of railroading is also here in Philly.


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NS CAMP

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Re: RailPictures.net
 
« Reply #177 on: Aug 18th, 2008, 10:02am »

on Aug 16th, 2008, 5:57pm, VaPennsyFan wrote:       (Click here for original message)

 
Now, a question for NS CAMP - you say you greatly improved the composition of your photos without any feedback from RP.net, as did all sorts of photographers before.  Fine.  Did you get feedback from anyone at all?  Did you ever take any account of anyone else's feedback?

 
To answer your question, I had no feedback guidance from anyone. In fact, I really had no audience for my railroad photos other than me. Of course, my family, along with the railroad employees I know, said my early pictures were nice, but I knew I was not shooting at my maximum potential.  
 
Cropping is a nice tool to use with digital images shot with both film and digital cameras. However, a good picture should be composed so that little or no cropping is required under most circumstances.


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RobR
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Re: RailPictures.net
 
« Reply #178 on: Aug 18th, 2008, 1:46pm »

on Aug 18th, 2008, 10:02am, NS CAMP wrote:       (Click here for original message)

Cropping is a nice tool to use with digital images shot with both film and digital cameras. However, a good picture should be composed so that little or no cropping is required under most circumstances.

 
Another statement I don't completely agree with.  I think you should compose your picture with a little bit more in it than you think you'll want.  That way, the cropping can be fine-tuned once you get into the darkroom (or PhotoShop).  A little earlier in this thread, there is an example of a picture that was rejected by RP.Net because of "bad cropping".  In this case, they were right: the picture was composed too tightly in the camera.  The photographer couldn't fix the problem because there was nothing else on the original image.
 
RobR


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NS CAMP

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Re: RailPictures.net
 
« Reply #179 on: Aug 18th, 2008, 2:58pm »

on Aug 18th, 2008, 1:46pm, RobR wrote:       (Click here for original message)

 
Another statement I don't completely agree with.  I think you should compose your picture with a little bit more in it than you think you'll want.  That way, the cropping can be fine-tuned once you get into the darkroom (or PhotoShop).  A little earlier in this thread, there is an example of a picture that was rejected by RP.Net because of "bad cropping".  In this case, they were right: the picture was composed too tightly in the camera.  The photographer couldn't fix the problem because there was nothing else on the original image.
 
RobR

 
 
Well, my reply says "little or no cropping" under most circumstances--not that cropping should never be done, and cropping to fine tune an image when needed is perfectly acceptable in my view. However, I trained myself to learn what I'll get from the viewfinder. On most quality cameras, the photographer gets slightly more of the frame recorded than what he or she sees through the viewfinder, and I feel that this fact must be taken into consideration when composing an image.
 
Digital shooters must also realize that cropping was not an option for photographers until digitalization. For years, accomplished photographers have held held sideshows of their images that were neither cropped nor edited.
 
E.T.A.: Changed article "a" to "an"


« Last Edit: Aug 18th, 2008, 11:10pm by NS CAMP » Logged
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