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Topic Summary
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 28th, 2011, 8:00pm
Hi all, Another new railway about to be born.
From my previous posts of Red Fred, I am now commited to making a start.
The property is near Brisbane, Queensland, Australia and is a little over 10 acres.  Mostly dense bushland, a reasonable sized creek, a couple of acres of grass on a slope of up to 1 in 30.
Like BCRR it will not be a club, but will welcome like-minded hobbyists.
To start with, the house will be the base of operations, so the garage is being fitted with racks and benches and my small collection of machines.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 28th, 2011, 8:20pm
The train racks (theres a third layer to come) are removable with the forklift.
The tracks continue through the bench structure, the centre one being part of the benchtop. Eventually the top row will hold car stock, while the bottom row will house the MOW worktrain. Heck, I'm going to be tidy for once in my life (it might not last, though )
Posted by: pockets Posted on: May 28th, 2011, 10:38pm
Sir,
Those stacks of wheels bespeak a transitory tidiness    Besides, a neat workshop is a sign of either a sick mind or someone who doesn't build things. Well...., you are in this hobby, but we all know  you are a builder  
 
Congrats on the new digs.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: 6491 Posted on: May 30th, 2011, 3:12am
G,day Pete....Good to see things are coming together for you.
John (SOUTHPASS).
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 30th, 2011, 4:35am
Greg, Just to to prove I can do pretty red lines too The top loop which will go  round the house, with a station out front.
Did the research and found that black steel bar is the preferred Ozzy track, but my friend Robert did some emailing and arranged a quote to extruded aluminium track to our specs, in 6 metre (20 foot) lengths, so I've ordered 3000 meters. A local specialist sawmill (they make bridges and walkways) will sell me treated hardwood offcuts at $150 A TON!!! Hopefully it will all materialise.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 30th, 2011, 4:43am
Meanwhile I have bought a shovel. The Kubota excavator went under in the flood and I put in a tender to the insurance for a song,  and won it. A bit of a haircut and it fits in the garage   No way can I dig anything by hand.
 
Hi John, critters welcome, but it will be a little while till its ready to go.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 5th, 2011, 4:46am
Sun was shining so I did some earthworks with the "toy" The basic cut was done before the house build, for a balloon loop right round the house.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 5th, 2011, 4:48am
Lost the centrepoint of the circle (there's a house in the way ) so made a plan with offsets to get round the blind corner
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 13th, 2011, 2:52am
Got in a few hours on the machine, then it started raining and I went back to painting (doh). The wet patch in the last pic is a "soak" which is now a gravel drain that will run next to the track. The yellow pins are on the track alignment.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 13th, 2011, 2:58am
Round the end of the house the "creek" goes its seperate way and the balloon loop keeps going round.  Theres a patch of soil here so I dug it out and put it aside for Ron (late Ron) and filled up with base material, which is natural and makes great road base.
Unfortunately a pivot pin cracked and dropped out of the excavator, so I'll have to make another before continuing.  
Pete
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Jun 13th, 2011, 10:09am
No fair!  The rest of us don't have access to earthmoving equipment!
Seriously, quite a lot of progress to show!  I saw that you were getting some aluminum rail extruded.  What alloy will they use?  Can you get it heat treated to T6 hardness?
Dan
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 14th, 2011, 5:37am
Dan, I don't have access to earthmovers, thats why I bought one I took the giant risk of selling my nice 3 bedroom house in civilisation, and built a two room shed in the boonies. That excavator roughly equals one bedroom The rail order takes out another bedroom. I hope this all works cos I don't think it can be traded back.
I dont have a spec for the ally, so now I'm worried. What are the possible alloys? I'll  try to see what's available. The samples are ready for collection so I'll need to act fast. Pete
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Jun 14th, 2011, 9:33am
I think most of the AL rail sold here is 6061 with T6 hardness.  6061 is a pretty common alloy.  The most desirable properties are hardness and wear resistance.
 
A comment (not meant as a criticism): your rail proportions are a little different than what is typically seen here.  The rail head width (15 mm) is a little wider in proportion to the rail height.  Typically this would be a proportion of 1:2.  Also the web thickness (8 mm, if I read your sketch correctly) is a little thicker than usual.  I don't see any problem with either of these, other than this will increase the unit cost per meter length.
 
Have a look at this data sheet on rail cross sections: http://www.unitracrail.com/pdfs2007/Track_Components_Section.pdf
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 18th, 2011, 3:10am
Just got the rail sample. It says that its 6106 T6 which means I can give a huge sigh of relief- thanks Dan.   Its real tough, I tried propping one end on the concrete slab and drove the car over it and it didn't have any effect. Now I will have to make a stronger rail bender as  the one in the pic probably wont cut the ice.  
The thicker than scale dimensions were an effort to make it resistant to damage and wear. The thick rib shouldn't be visible and the wider top is still narrower than the wheels, so oil should stay off. Thats the theory anyway, time will tell
Pete
Posted by: ac16 Posted on: Jun 18th, 2011, 8:08am
Hi all,
Good progress there Pete, and the rail looks the part and strong - thank god. The reason for the heavy rail is as Pete only really has 2 other blokes helping him out with track laying and maintenance so the less he has to worry about replacing things the better. Also in Australia there is a wee bit of resistance to aluminium rail so we figured if we are going to make a good case for it we’d better make sure it was almost indestructible.  
In yards and for the points I believe we are going with welded up black steel bar. At the minute I am coming up with the design for the trailable facing points with indicator, proving fun as I need something that locks across while train passes through then flicks back… (ingenuity don’t fail me now) will post up when finished.
Somemore pic’s and I m rather surprised that Pete didn’t mention the HUGE Waterfall over which we are planning a fairly sizeable bridge - think it worked out at 18 meters.
 


 
Regards
Rob
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Jun 18th, 2011, 9:21am
Now THAT is a feature that many of us envy.... Just to have water - stream, pond, ditch - is very desireable, but falling water? That's an order of magnitude up the scale.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: ac16 Posted on: Jun 18th, 2011, 9:40am
Hi Greg
 
What is more annoying was we didn’t know it was there when Pete bought it (something about him being scared of snakes and other bitey things ) so it wasn’t until I came up (much like Indiana Jones) for a visit we discovered A) the waterfall B) the sandstone cliffed (2m high in spots) creek that leads to it.  
 
Running idea as it stands (Pete may correct me ) is that the line will loop around the house trundle down the paddock to about the half way point at around 1:80 horse shoe back to the site of the main station (still falling away at around 1:80) then head into the bush and skirt along the sandstone cliff, at around 1:100, to the waterfall and bridge over it, then just on the other side of said waterfall is going to be the terminus and Y to turn the loco around the consist. If we get enough people this side of the pond interested we are hoping to have some miniature bush industries turn up at this location.
At this stage we are looking at 3 passing loops (including the main station) 3 of which will have Trailable facing points operating them (thus meaning we can have trains passing (using staff and ticket of course) without anyone getting off a loco and changing any points.
Some more pic's
Looking down to waterfall water hole pic2
Trailable facing points we are modeling

 
Rob
Posted by: ac16 Posted on: Jun 18th, 2011, 9:51am
Map of Route (last time i checked anyway)
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Jun 18th, 2011, 11:43am
Hi Pete,
I'm glad your rail sample came through with the "right" alloy and hardness.  And I understand completely about the rationale on the proportions.
 
The waterfall is a pretty amazing and unique feature to incorporate into the RR.  To echo Pockets, we are all very envious of this natural attraction you have.  In the cajun french part of Louisiana, this would be called lagniappe, or something extra thrown in that was not expected.
 
Here's a photo of the track used by club I belong to (Chattanooga Society of Live Steamers) that has a similar feature of a rock outcropping (but no waterfall).  The reason the same train (my Davenport locomotive) appears twice is that it is a panorama of two photos spliced together.
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Jun 18th, 2011, 12:24pm
Here's an option for you to consider.  Some logging RRs here in the US would lay track right across a stream bed rather than building a bridge.  An example is illustrated in this drawing my daughter did, based on a composite of several photos of logging railroads.  You could run your track on the ledge above the waterfall, so you would get a view "looking over the edge" as you cross the stream.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 19th, 2011, 3:04am
Nice drawing of the Climax. That bridge looks like Eagle Point, a website that I visit regularly. Now thats what I call hard work, but what a result!
Rob, where's those two blokes you mentioned were helping? They haven't shown up yet Yes that plan is still current, but it's still uncharted territory so exact details are a bit hazy.
The tramways way up North have rails laid in the creeks (The Savannalander still crosses one near Forsayth) and I planned a creek run as part or the drain now under construction.(too risky to use the actual creek} Watch this space!
The waterfall has been named "Rob's Downfall", because he did
This is my snake scaring crew
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Jun 19th, 2011, 11:36am
Thanks for the compliment on the drawing.  My daughter does nice work for not being a railfan  
 
Yes, that is indeed Eagle Point.  The Tracey City branch (where the bridge is located) is my favorite piece of the RR.
 
About "Rob's Downfall", I hope that's not how the waterfall was discovered!  This reminds me of another famous location in Florida.  We'll have to get Bruce the Lesser to explain how "Raykiewicz Landing" by the high trestle on the Buckinham Central got its name  
 
A question, you refer to "trailable facing points".  Is this the same as what we in the U.S. would call a "spring switch"?  Meaning that the points, if aligned for the wrong path, don't have to be moved to the correct position when going through them in the direction where the two tracks converge into one?  (Difficult to put into words without using the terms "facing" or "trailing".)
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Jun 20th, 2011, 8:10am
Pete,
Regarding the aluminum alloys, I looked up the physical properties of 6061 and 6063 (another common alloy) and here is what I found:
 
6063
Tensile strength (T6, T651)       241       MPa       35000       psi
Yield strength (T6, T651)          214       MPa       31000       psi
Elongation (T6, T651)                 12       %           12       %
Shear strength (T6, T651)        152       MPa       22000       psi
Fatigue strength (T6, T651)       69       MPa       10000       psi
Hardness (T6, T651)                  73       HB          73        HB
 
6061
Tensile strength (T6, T651)       310      MPa       45000       psi
Yield strength (T6, T651)          276      MPa       40000       psi
Elongation (T6, T651)                 12      %           12       %
Shear strength (T6, T651)        207      MPa       30000       psi
Fatigue strength (T6, T651)       97       MPa       14000       psi
Hardness (T6, T651)                  95       HB          95       HB  
 
Quite a big difference between the two alloys, especially the hardness!
Posted by: ac16 Posted on: Jun 20th, 2011, 9:56am
Hi,
 
well i didnt fall, more a holy heck who put that drop there!
 
Ok basics of trailable facing points (pete is still getting his head around them) is as follows:
 
The points counter weight is locked into Normal running position (eg correct road), however back from the counter weight is a dampening device (a shock absorber if you will) which allows trains from wrong road to pass through the points (pushing the blade across) the indicator shows that the points return back after the last car has passed the points.
 
now the fun part
 
If in an emergancy the wrong road must be taken the counter weight can be unlocked and the points can be set for wrong road... however if a train trys to come through from the correct road and "trail through" the points when set against them to wrong it will not be able to push the blades across (eg the dampener will not activate) and  you are left with a derailed train (that said the indicator shows that the road is against you.
 
What is the point of this? it's to idiot proof the passing loops and ballon loop (eg wrong road can only be activated with a key) to avoid collisions or misadventures. Also it is fairly unique to australia - only other place i know of using a similar system in place is in golly old germany.
 
 
Hope this helps
 
Rob
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Jun 20th, 2011, 7:19pm
Pete,
Although not a current operation, the two-foot gauge Mt. Gretna (1890 - 1914) used a reversing -baloon- loop on the mountain at it's outer end. That's their #15 in my signature photo.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 1st, 2011, 8:11am
Just a quick update. This is reply #9 tidied up and roadbed base in. One of the two road crossings will go here, probably steel bar rail, welded to reo mesh and cast into concrete. The alloy rail is due any day, but I will need to make a serious bending roller as this stuff don't bend by hand.
What do you guys use for bending?
Pete
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Jul 1st, 2011, 11:47pm
I don't have a photo, but at Eagle Point we use a slip roll type bender.  The rollers are about as wide as the height of the rail, and machined to fit the profile of the rail.  There is a crank handle on one of the rollers, so the rail can be cranked through.  Once set for the desired radius, a single pass through is all it takes.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Jul 2nd, 2011, 6:44am

 
   Hi Pete,
 
   Sorry that I did'nt respond quicker to the huge amount of progress that you've made. HOLY HANNA, your moveing right along,,,,, in a hurry.
 
   As to the "Raykiewicz Falls" story, I'll just have to put it together for all to read and enjoy shortly.
 
   Again, I'm impressed with all of the work that has been done, You'll be running sooner than you think.
 
   Bruce
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 4th, 2011, 11:45pm
Next workshop job is to start making tools (like the roller) and jigs and drilling templates, etc.   Meanwhile I had a delivery. Not sure whether I'm excited or scared . Man that looks like a lifetime of work.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 4th, 2011, 11:53pm
Even the neighbours came out for a look.    Mom, Dad and 2.4 kids  (0.4 is in the pouch)
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 5th, 2011, 12:04am
Another new toy thanks to ebay, a laser level. Trying to get my head around the issue of getting down the hill from the house. I've started dumping fill for the embankment and aim to use a trestle for partway. If I can keep the height below 1 meter (3 feet and a bit) then it wont need handrails.  Here's some "Clam Lake" red lines painted on.
Posted by: Boulder Creek Posted on: Jul 6th, 2011, 7:57pm
G'day Pete,
 
Your railway is looking fantastic! I'll have to bring my loco up for a run one day!
 
Regards,
Dave.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 15th, 2011, 5:40am
Dave, when you come up you might like to bring some of your extensive electrics knowledge with you.....and a sledge hammer to knock it into me
 
 
Spent an interesting weekend in northern New South Wales looking at alloy track and a couple of private tracks. Outcome is that I might re-prep the top loop with a larger radius, to minimise chopping out the railhead.  Interestingly the park kiddy ride people worked out that when the railhead wore, they use a circular saw, in a trolley jig,and ally blade, to cut off the inner head back to the web, then fixed a steel strip in. Very ingenious , and has been there for several years now, running 1/2 ton locos.
Pete
 
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 16th, 2011, 4:22am
Raining today so started on jigs. This is my method for tie fixing.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 16th, 2011, 4:24am
If the final tie gets a golden spike, what does the first one get?
 
This is one of the "offcuts" from the sawmill. Not only is it as hard as nails, but they also docked the lot to length and still only charged  firewood price. I'll soak them after drilling, but I doubt whether much will get in.  
The guys down South spread cow dip on the track once a year....aparently it kills any bugs including termites.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 16th, 2011, 4:34am
Not all beer and skittles though.  Got the orange shovel out this afternoon, but something went bang. Guess what my job tonight is
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Jul 16th, 2011, 5:23pm
Pete,
I wouldn't worry about rail wear on your track.  The park train probably gets run a LOT, and a private track not so much.  I'm not saying you shouldn't increase the radius of your track, but that should be based on operational requirements, not rail wear concerns.  A couple of things that will help is to increase the gauge a little on the curves, and raise the outside rail somewhat (superelevation).  Others can chime in on how much.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 17th, 2011, 8:14am
A quick U-tube tutorial on "vertical up welding on 1/2" plate" and we're back in business.
Truth is, I wasn't 100% happy with the driveway crossings, so the new alignment gives another 2 metres on the radius and a better grade crossing.....Bob, the map's out of date now
Meanwhile in the shop, the rail bender is in progress.  Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 31st, 2011, 6:40am
I found the pic of the train "through the creek" similar to what Dan Watson's Climax picture showed. It was done so that floods would go over the rails. A cheaper alternative to a bridge, on a line where a few days wait was not considered a big deal
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 31st, 2011, 6:49am
Meanwhile I bumble along making tools. I picked up some 25 x 12 (1" x 1/2") steel bar, for turnouts etc, and it looked a bit tough to bend, so the rolling machine got toughened up a bit. This is the frame with rail in place,waitng for the bearings and shafts to be installed. Pretty it ain't
Pete
Posted by: ac16 Posted on: Aug 2nd, 2011, 2:48pm
hmmm me thinks, pete, the map is becoming a joke
 
rail bender looks pretty chunky and i like the new allignment. BTW where did you pick up those sprockets from, (need some for harplings 0-4-0)?
 
Rob
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 3rd, 2011, 6:17am
Chunky, eh!    Well here it is with the chunky bits painted in pretty hammer finish
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 3rd, 2011, 6:22am
And a closer view. That rail doesnt stand a chance against this baby!
Sprockets from Bearing Supplies (multi function soft centres so you can turn them out to your favourite bore).  Chain from the same place, but dear as poison.
I cut the kitchen chairs down to make feed supports, will try it at the weekend.
Pete
Posted by: ac16 Posted on: Aug 3rd, 2011, 8:03am
very nifty bit of kit mate. rail better hold up or im a dead man...
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Aug 3rd, 2011, 5:49pm
  Hi Pete,
 
   Thats a nice piece of inventiveness. I like that!!
 
   Bruce R.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 4th, 2011, 4:58am
Thanks guys.....it made a bit of room in the junk box too
Next is to copy the club automatic gauge improver.  Used when laying track. The idea is the triangle sits on straight track exactly at gauge. The outside rail is first secured to the ties. When the jig is placed with the long side on the outside of a curve, the inside rail will be set easy gauge and is ready to be screwed or welded .  Ideally the long side should be the same length as your longest fixed wheelbase, then the gauge increase will suit all your stock.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 4th, 2011, 5:02am
The other jig is the "superelevator". Self explanitory, but I think I might try for a simpler version.
Beside it is the "persuader" for rotating the track to the correct cant.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 6th, 2011, 3:38am
So here's the rolling rig at work. Steel bar slowed it down but results are A1
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 6th, 2011, 3:41am
And the outcome for todays effort.....One grade crossing ready to plant and concrete in place.    My very first track panel
Posted by: ac16 Posted on: Aug 6th, 2011, 9:14am
That looks really good mate, light work of things
 
Rob
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 17th, 2011, 3:02am
Been a bit quiet here lately. Here's a progress shot taken from the other end of "reply 37".  The old alignment (where the cat is, er, fertilising)will now be a siding, while the main, on the right, will become a station.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 17th, 2011, 3:09am
The house passed its final building inspection without a wimper   so now I can dig holes and rearrange things .  The station will need water and drainage for the water tower, and power for the lights. Later it will get a canopy and also a coal stage.
Pete
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Aug 17th, 2011, 6:31pm
hey pete!
 
keep the good stuff coming!  ya doin' good friend...just make sure your junk bin stays full so you can keep building stuff.
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Aug 17th, 2011, 7:10pm
on Aug 4th, 2011, 5:02am, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
The other jig is the "superelevator". Self explanitory, but I think I might try for a simpler version.Pete

 
Pete, how about some more pictures of this tool?  I would like to see the lower part in a couple of different views.  Right now, we use the belly flop and stare as our sighting tool with a level for elevation changes.
 
Tom C.
Posted by: ac16 Posted on: Aug 18th, 2011, 1:08am
Looking good there mate
 
Rob
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 18th, 2011, 4:21am
Tom,  it's a pendulum basically. There's a bearing at the top of the A frame(I can live without that) and a plastic trough which acts as a damper when filled with water, half way down (I can live without that too .
At the bottom is a plumb bob weight and a scale, which could read degrees or radius, etc. It sits on a baseplate on the track and you read off the really big numbers without stooping.  The accuracy might be a bit suspect in Wyoming or Chicago if the wind gets behind it
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 28th, 2011, 2:52am
Time to dig up the driveway and lay the crossing. Ready for concrete next Saturday. Theres a pad for the station too.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 28th, 2011, 3:07am
Station prep
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 28th, 2011, 3:13am
It will be a small wayside halt, like this one, with basic water and coal facilities. Its other purpose is to hold garden tools and the rider mower, freeing up some workshop space/
Pete
Posted by: 6491 Posted on: Sep 3rd, 2011, 10:25pm
G,day Pete....well how's the body going after the concrete pour? You are certainly putting in some work there. Thought I might have caught you at Grandchester or Track & Tent, though looking at the work you are getting done I can see where you were.
Have a good one and keep on tracking....John(southpass).
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 4th, 2011, 3:11am
Hi John. Sent you a pm. My back hates me, but its done. Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 2nd, 2011, 3:58am
Had a few spare days so did a bit more prep. Station slab, platform ready for final topping, soil, mulch and plants all done. what else does it need? Oh yeah........... track
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 2nd, 2011, 4:02am
And from the other end, prepped station yard. Looks like it's time to see if I can build a turnout for the siding.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Oct 2nd, 2011, 7:18am

 
   Hey Pete,
 
   WOW, I'ved missed a whole bunch of stuff that you've done. Holy mackeral, from rail benders, to earth moveing to drive way construction. And as an old track man, I like that track tool. Thanks for all of the pics.
 
   Bruce R.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 5th, 2011, 3:43am
Couldn't resist trying a couple of track panels. Only 498 to go!
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Oct 5th, 2011, 9:16am
This is developing into a sweet line. People new to the hobby don't appreciate the prep work involved before the first tie hits the ground.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 9th, 2011, 9:10pm
Amen to that!  
The number of workers doubled this weekend. Young Isaac helped haul rail sections and put then through the roller. Seriously tough job for an adult let alone a nine year old. I think he's hooked
Then we bought sleeper ties up from the treatment plant and stacked them for drilling. There should be enough materials for another 80 feet of track next visit.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 19th, 2011, 2:21am
A bit more progress. Tidy station area
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 19th, 2011, 2:28am
And some prep into the start of the serpentine. Lots of fill needed for the embankment in the distance behind the tank.  
I rechecked my calculations and found a mistake in the grades. doh!
To fix it, I've lowered the station exit, now it's 1 in 40 (2 1/2%) then goes into the serpentine at 1 in 50 (2%) but at 18metre (55 ft) radius. That'll sort out the engineers from the boys
Pete
Posted by: JWB46 Posted on: Oct 19th, 2011, 5:59am
Good day Pete....I have got to give you full points for getting things done
Looking good.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 23rd, 2011, 4:34am
Talking of points , another weekend draws to a close following construction of the first switch, using Dave's "Boulder Creek" method.
Following rough setout using alloy stock, the offsets are marked on the 2 by 4, then outer rails tacked to bar sleeper ties.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 23rd, 2011, 4:38am
Assembly transferred to forklift (adjustable stand!) and the infill bits done.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 23rd, 2011, 4:43am
A coat of rusty rail paint, and timber ties fixed on. (the closure rails will be added later when I work out how to machine them) and lifted out on to site with the excavator. The "head of rail" moves slowly forward
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 23rd, 2011, 4:48am
Another hi-tech special tool joins the arsenal. A starter rebar with a 5/16 socket welded on the end. Allows the track screws to be set tight with drill, then backed off half a turn to allow the expansion movement.
Pete
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 23rd, 2011, 9:57am
Pete,  the track work looks fantastic.  It's great to see , a young live steamer.   They are the future of the hobby.  Thank you for posting the pics. Ray III
Posted by: Boulder Creek Posted on: Oct 27th, 2011, 6:59pm
Looking fantastic Pete,
 
I'm glad my points construction article has been of use!
For anyone interested, see: Boulder Creek "points construction"  
 
Regards,
Dave.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 3rd, 2011, 5:00am
Spent the morning writing job applications and having thoroughly depressed myself,  I decided to turn the brain off and lay track
The turnout for the workshop road is now ready so it's off the forklift and on to the excavator for the slow trip.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 3rd, 2011, 5:05am
It's a wye of 18m and 15m radii, with a killer grade to the workshop, requiring a vertical bend to the rail straight off the turnout.  Hope it doesn't need a winch!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 3rd, 2011, 5:16am
Next challenge is the switch at the start of the embankment. It marks the connection of the balloon loop, which is all prepped and ready for tracklaying.
Unfortunately I've used all the sleeper ties so will have to go scrounging in town, but meanwhile there's lots of rail that can be bent and painted and drilled, (and the people power rig to finish, 2 wagons and a carriage to build, a steamer to finish...........yeah, right )
This is head of steel, with the balloon prep hiding behind the top wire of the fence.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 13th, 2011, 7:36pm
I tried making points closers (the tapered bits ) using a small angle grinder, but it was a drag.  Fortunately my neighbour, who is a fitter and turner at a coal mine, offered me an end mill to try.
Long story and much head scratching, but this is what I came up with. 4 inches at a time, took about 7 hours machine time, but the result is good and the cost is my favourite, zip
Pete
 
 
ps He's getting me some coal too
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 25th, 2011, 2:04am
Struck gold at a backstreet woodyard.   30 lengths of "coathangers". OK quality, real cheap, and the bends don't matter.
I've foolishly called an open day on Sat 10th Dec so now there's a scramble to complete the balloon in time. I must be mad
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 10th, 2011, 9:14pm
Just a quickie from the Saturday open day. I'll post some track pics soon. This is some of the guests checking out the railmotor. That track was laid on Thursday and ballasted on Friday night
Pete
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Dec 10th, 2011, 11:09pm
cool!  glad to see the railmotor out on the line!  keep up the good work.
 
moose
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 11th, 2011, 4:03am
Hi Moose,  Actually it was the steamer that christened the line. It did two laps, then started loosing water out of the firebox. Turned out to be the syphon tube, but still requres boiler out. Didn't get a pic cause I was kinda ticked off
However, here's the opened balloon loop. The group had a great day, lots of smiles and plenty of food and cheer.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 11th, 2011, 4:06am
more
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 11th, 2011, 4:08am
more
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 11th, 2011, 4:09am
still more
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 11th, 2011, 4:12am
End of stage one and start of trestle
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 11th, 2011, 4:21am
The ladies dsappeared to check the neighbours prize garden, which left the men with nothing to do but sit around!
Posted by: JWB46 Posted on: Dec 11th, 2011, 4:34am
G,day Pete....glad the day went well for you. The track is looking great.  
When I get over present issues I am hoping to get over and see your operation
Posted by: Boulder Creek Posted on: Dec 18th, 2011, 7:23pm
Looking great Pete,
 
Keep the pictures coming!
 
Dave.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 25th, 2011, 4:52am
Seems the open day was a good idea. There is a work party next week and the track has some real nice, scale point levers being made. (bit too nice to leave out, but great for photo shoots)
Also fixed the excavator after I rolled it, and have landed a job for the new year. Things are looking up.
Celebrated by building the chassis for the "country coach", pics later
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 25th, 2011, 4:57am
and
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 30th, 2011, 5:29am
Had a huge storm which washed out the car park into the station. Didn't want that again so raised the carpark to direct the rain away. Used some of the rocks for a little retaining wall. Good outcome!   (compare with reply no. 67)
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 30th, 2011, 6:02am
One of the open day crowd, Scotty, turned up on Wednesday with lunch, mother and chainsaw.  Since he is not scared of snakes and dragons and things that go bump in the night, it was decided to attack the forest.
End of day and several tons of fire timber later and theres nearly 300 yards of track prep done.  Amazing what can be achieved when friends turn up.
Pete
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Dec 30th, 2011, 7:15pm
on Dec 30th, 2011, 5:29am, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Had a huge storm which washed out the car park into the station. Didn't want that again so raised the carpark to direct the rain away. Used some of the rocks for a little retaining wall. Good outcome!   (compare with reply no. 57)
Pete

 
Pete that is a beautiful stone retaining wall and landscaping. It is the little details that make the difference.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 18th, 2012, 3:46am
Not much progress lately, I'm too busy fixing all the stuff that broke  The boiler got its new pipe and was pressure tested today.  Firebox has been relined in fireclay, so the rebuild can get under way.  All these new skills to learn!
The paint job suffered so I'm trying this time with professional auto paint in aerosol cans, so far it looks a superior finish but its not cheap. This is the shop looking more like a junk yard, and a glimpse of the country coach chassis.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 18th, 2012, 3:53am
There are several large dangerous trees in the bush. This widow-maker wont be a problem any more, but it didn't half come down with a bang!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 18th, 2012, 4:00am
Near to the waterfall the bush gets quite thick. Swinging a 60ft curve gets interesting. I'd hate to be doing this without the orange shovel.
Peter
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Feb 18th, 2012, 9:18am
on Feb 18th, 2012, 3:46am, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Not much progress lately, I'm too busy fixing all the stuff that broke  The boiler got its new pipe and was pressure tested today.  Firebox has been relined in fireclay, so the rebuild can get under way.  All these new skills to learn!
The paint job suffered so I'm trying this time with professional auto paint in aerosol cans, so far it looks a superior finish but its not cheap. This is the shop looking more like a junk yard, and a glimpse of the country coach chassis.

 
 
hey pete, whatta ya mean the shop is a mess?  ya can still see the floor!!!  can't do that in my shop.  
 
please, please let's see some more of the country coach.  believe it or not, i get a opportunity to learn from what you are doing...and i enjoy it.  the BVT is on my 'bucket list' for things to do or places to visit as soon as i retire.  who knows, maybe we could organize a 'railfan.net' group tour!?   well, something to think about.  what a motley cruise it would turn into!  
 
keep the pics coming and have fun growing the railroad.  a finished railroad (well, they're never finished...really)is wonderful, but i've learned that i enjoy being in on the challenges of how, where and why of right of way planning.  there's something about putting down rails where they've never been before.
 
keep up the good work!
 
moose
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 19th, 2012, 3:45am
 
 The kind gentleman who helped with the boiler repair, is 84years old and his shed is like Alladin's cave. I reckon has has one unfinished project for each year of his life (plus the 1-1 roller in the front yard) but there's barely room for one person to work
Group tour.....no problem....what would you like for breakfast?  Looks like I'm back at work for six months at least, then the pension should kick in and I can get some trainplay in again.
Thanks for your compliments. My progress would have been much, much slower without this forum and all the help and encouragement. I try to listen to all the comments.....then I go away and do it my way
This is what you get from the archives
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 19th, 2012, 4:15am
Early Queensland had some problems with vast distances, impassible terrain, and major budget restrictions  (bit like the BVT, eh!)  so came up with train specs different to what you are used to.
All country trains ran mixed, but the guard didn't get a caboose to himself, instead he had to share it with passengers, or at times with sheep or milk cans. Later when train brakes came in, the layout persisted.
3'6" gauge was the first mainline narrow gauge in the world, and worked so well that it still exists, albeit with tilt rains. Narrow gauge meant sharp curves and steep hills, so my country coach has small wheels and bogie truck centres very near the ends, to prevent buffer locking on 200ft curves.
End doors, double roof and cast iron work were all hallmarks of the tropics, as were the 2 class seating and (indoor!) toilets. No beds or kitchens then as trains only operated in daytime. The guard frequently also looked after passing train movements, as there were no signals, only staff and ticket.
Wagons were built to the skimpiest of plans and frequently varied to suit the intended line, so the panelled CV (combination brake van) became stick sided CLV (2 lavatory toilets added).
This van in a local museum has similar parts, so is good for dimensioning.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 19th, 2012, 4:54am
Enough of history.  I plan to operate sort of of like the original, so brakes will only be on the back vehicle, using a remote control (via garage door button) for one man op. Also, all my wagons will be rideon-enabled so need to be built tough.  Frame is 40mm angle (8" timber) with ply body and ally roof. Bogies are my internally bearinged, two stage sprung beams with  non functioning axlebox bits.  Sprung buffers and 3 link couplins (love those huge "Mickey Mouse" buffers)
Internally a part removable roof with cooler box and seat for one.  
Here it is so far, with my drawings pinned to the wall (only room for half length elevation)
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 28th, 2012, 4:16am
I've decided to build a plywood carcase and clad it in aluminum, so here's the "box". The centre section will be for one or two seats.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 10th, 2012, 1:11am
Waiting for the cladding, thought Id start yet another job....the station. (I do things a/ when  can afford to b/ when I have materials, and c/ when Im in the mood
Promoted the orange shovel to orange crane and lifted some panels in.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 10th, 2012, 1:13am
And finished with some beam balancing. At least its progress.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 18th, 2012, 2:53am
Continuing with the station. Nearly clad and ready for roof and canopy
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 18th, 2012, 3:02am
An offer from a neighbour, of this shelter means some more space in the workshop. My son and a friend helped and three of us moved and rebuilt this in four hours, in the rain It's in the bush, next to the right of way, away from prying planning officers. Its next to the creek so will make a nice bar b que spot, and if all else could house the sleeper treatment plant (or hooch still  )
When the station is usable, all the garden tools and mower will go in there , leaving enough room to swing a cat in the workshop
Pete
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Mar 18th, 2012, 10:40am
on Mar 18th, 2012, 3:02am, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
An offer from a neighbour, of this shelter means some more space in the workshop. My son and a friend helped and three of us moved and rebuilt this in four hours, in the rain
When the station is usable, all the garden tools an mower will go in there and be out of the shop, leaving enough room to swing a cat
Pete

 
Ah, the ancient art of Australian Cat Swinging!!! I look forward to the pictures!
 
Seriously, you have very nice neighbors. The carport is a great and useful addition.  
 
Bobby
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 9th, 2012, 2:06am
Ah, Easter...4 days to work on the job list. A bit of detailing on the station.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 9th, 2012, 2:09am
Then back to the planned job, trestle building. An offer of help didn't happen so the one man crew made a start. Should have waited as didn't look where I was going. Dented pride , sore hip but no damage to the orange shovel.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 9th, 2012, 2:16am
Tonka toy breakdown crew to the rescue.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 9th, 2012, 2:18am
And a quick snatch with the Hilux. Now where was I? Ah yes, trestle bents to be dug.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 9th, 2012, 2:24am
Progress was not quite what I expected but OK for the scared and wounded   All the centre posts done (to ensure even curve) but many outers still to concrete in.
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Apr 9th, 2012, 5:12am
Good to see that you survived.
 
As you know "Good judgement comes from experience, experience comes from bad judgement."
 
I really like to follow your project - keep up the good work.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 30th, 2012, 4:35am
Progress, slow but sure. Loco coming back together and country coach moving along slowly
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 30th, 2012, 4:40am
Loco all in one piece again (going out for a run this weekend) and carriage on its wheels
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 30th, 2012, 4:46am
Speaking of wheels, this is the bogie (truck) "carcase" with self aligning bearings and two stage springs. Later a dummy cosmetic layer will be added, with leaf springs and axleboxes.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 30th, 2012, 4:49am
And a close up showing that there is still a little articulation. A shim washer between the halves of the bearing carrier prevents the bearing from being "nipped up"
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 30th, 2012, 4:53am
Lastly, especially for Bobby, the "swinging" Australian Cat in the workshop
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Apr 30th, 2012, 3:32pm
The chooch is looking nice and I really like that little station.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Apr 30th, 2012, 6:22pm
on Apr 30th, 2012, 4:53am, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Lastly, especially for Bobby, the "swinging" Australian Cat in the workshop

 
Every good shop should have one!  
 
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 31st, 2012, 4:32am
Spent a very satisfying day at the club, carting the public for charity. (we don't normally do public)
Anyhow, several members bought carriages, one set used an airbrake system recently marketed by DNC Systems (shameless plug )
It works by remote control using garage door remotes and performed really well on the two riding cars. Just the thing for Jamaican bobsleds
As I was planning brakes for the country coach, this seemed the way to go.  
Here's a pic of some of the bits I've collected.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 31st, 2012, 4:46am
Needs a car battery (exterally charged)  
12volt air compressor
Tank, possibly old fire extinguisher or propane tank, I recycled an airbrush kit
Control box, with on-off switch, pressure switch and solenoid valve.
Air ram 25mm x 20mm, one per bogie truck.
I wish to operate coach independant of train so I added a manual ball valve which can be turned on for train brakes to other wagons.
 
To operate you take one of the remotes back to the loco and if you need a touch of brake you hit the bottom button. The brakes stay on as long as you hold the button.
If you hit the middle button, the brakes go on and stay on until you hit the top button to release.
I have finally handed in my notice, so next month I commence a life of stress free trainplay, slowed only by the poverty that accompanies retirement
Pete
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Jun 1st, 2012, 7:45pm
CONGRATS ON RETIREMENT!

 
....most of us are jealous of you!  
 
now you'll have time for more projects...and like the rest of us...you won't be able to afford them!  ....well, at least you'll have the time to post more about the projects you can't afford.  'that's how we do it.
 
pete, enjoy a little bit of time not doing anything.  after that, you'll be busier than when you were working. ...make sure you stay that way!
 
...9 more years for me...daumn long time.....
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 28th, 2012, 5:04am
One day to retirement and the boss tells me I cant go cos my replacement lost his licence for 3 months. Compromise is I'll do 3 days a week until he's back. Railroad empire on hold again.
Meanwhile it's mid winter here. This is what paradise looks like on the shortest day
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 28th, 2012, 5:14am
Seeing Tom's efforts spurs me on so some work on the carriage.
This is the aluminium sides, the matchboarding joints are done with a score-and-snap knife. More score and less snap.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 28th, 2012, 5:15am
And closer
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 28th, 2012, 5:19am
Then the windows get rough cut with anglegrinder. (waterjet or laser would be much quicker )
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 28th, 2012, 5:25am
Then glued to the carcase with contact glue. Next will be to set up a mask for the router and trim the holes to size.
Posted by: Pennsy4483 Posted on: Jun 28th, 2012, 8:45am
Looking great?  Keep up the work and the updates,  Sorry to hear about your retirement delay.
 
Happy Steaming (and building)!
 
Don
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 8th, 2012, 3:13am
Time to get the hands dirty again.   Robert escaped the frozen wastes of Canberra for some sunshine and a dose of train time. Thats him on the left with me on the right posing for his mom.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 8th, 2012, 3:17am
While here he helped to attack the bush on the approach  to the waterfall, setting out a turning triangle. Something I couldn't do on my own cos you can't swing a tape measure in the dense undergrowth. Mainline heads to the left. Note the blue tractor on the back leg.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 8th, 2012, 3:20am
Tractor hasn't moved, but this pic taken with my back to the waterfall. This area will have to be given a big tidy up in a couple of weeks, as there is no access once the track is installed
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 8th, 2012, 3:25am
And a bit more work on the number one important job, the workshop access road. Nearly ready for rail.
Pete.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 12th, 2012, 2:48am
Window mask in place. Way too hard to router a slot, so did a rough cut, slightly undersize, with jigsaw then ran round with router. Easy peasy!
I found a similar carriage article on home machinist, looks like the same methods. Pullman was from Roy Rabbits Comanche track (one of my favourites)
Pete
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Jul 12th, 2012, 8:15am
Templates are your best friend.  We will use one when we cut the windows on the next caboose as the saber saw is to hard to control for a nice straight cut!
 
Tom C.
Posted by: boaterri Posted on: Jul 12th, 2012, 11:07am
Once the track is installed on the turning triangle you should have excellent access to the area for clean out.  Just think of all the "logging trains" you could run........
 
Rick
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 29th, 2012, 11:30pm
Quick update. Logging trains on the tramway.....bring it on. Meawhile there's a few stumps and things that wont fit on trains, so I'll do those first.
Here's a rough of the country coach with windows and 4mm (3/16) alloy roof, sitting on its wheels.
In the foreground is B15, just returned from the boiler inspector with a brand new certificate (issued under the tough new legislation) Woo-hoo!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 29th, 2012, 11:36pm
A chance conversation revealed a friend of my son has a laser cutter and has offered to do the verandah ends for the coach in 1/8th steel
I cant do CAD, so have done some pen and ink drawings that son will transfer to DWF.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 29th, 2012, 11:46pm
Finally, a bit of US content. Some Bettendorf castings from Jim at Boston Loco. Beautifully made and exactly matches my prototype for the future cattle wagons. Exchange rate is working in favour of Oz, but more than 20 lbs creates postal bedlam.
Pete
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Aug 1st, 2012, 7:38pm
hey pete!
 
looks like christmas morning!
 
 
moose