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Topic Summary
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 28th, 2011, 8:00pm
Hi all, Another new railway about to be born.
From my previous posts of Red Fred, I am now commited to making a start.
The property is near Brisbane, Queensland, Australia and is a little over 10 acres.  Mostly dense bushland, a reasonable sized creek, a couple of acres of grass on a slope of up to 1 in 30.
Like BCRR it will not be a club, but will welcome like-minded hobbyists.
To start with, the house will be the base of operations, so the garage is being fitted with racks and benches and my small collection of machines.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 28th, 2011, 8:20pm
The train racks (theres a third layer to come) are removable with the forklift.
The tracks continue through the bench structure, the centre one being part of the benchtop. Eventually the top row will hold car stock, while the bottom row will house the MOW worktrain. Heck, I'm going to be tidy for once in my life (it might not last, though )
Posted by: pockets Posted on: May 28th, 2011, 10:38pm
Sir,
Those stacks of wheels bespeak a transitory tidiness    Besides, a neat workshop is a sign of either a sick mind or someone who doesn't build things. Well...., you are in this hobby, but we all know  you are a builder  
 
Congrats on the new digs.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: 6491 Posted on: May 30th, 2011, 3:12am
G,day Pete....Good to see things are coming together for you.
John (SOUTHPASS).
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 30th, 2011, 4:35am
Greg, Just to to prove I can do pretty red lines too The top loop which will go  round the house, with a station out front.
Did the research and found that black steel bar is the preferred Ozzy track, but my friend Robert did some emailing and arranged a quote to extruded aluminium track to our specs, in 6 metre (20 foot) lengths, so I've ordered 3000 meters. A local specialist sawmill (they make bridges and walkways) will sell me treated hardwood offcuts at $150 A TON!!! Hopefully it will all materialise.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 30th, 2011, 4:43am
Meanwhile I have bought a shovel. The Kubota excavator went under in the flood and I put in a tender to the insurance for a song,  and won it. A bit of a haircut and it fits in the garage   No way can I dig anything by hand.
 
Hi John, critters welcome, but it will be a little while till its ready to go.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 5th, 2011, 4:46am
Sun was shining so I did some earthworks with the "toy" The basic cut was done before the house build, for a balloon loop right round the house.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 5th, 2011, 4:48am
Lost the centrepoint of the circle (there's a house in the way ) so made a plan with offsets to get round the blind corner
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 13th, 2011, 2:52am
Got in a few hours on the machine, then it started raining and I went back to painting (doh). The wet patch in the last pic is a "soak" which is now a gravel drain that will run next to the track. The yellow pins are on the track alignment.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 13th, 2011, 2:58am
Round the end of the house the "creek" goes its seperate way and the balloon loop keeps going round.  Theres a patch of soil here so I dug it out and put it aside for Ron (late Ron) and filled up with base material, which is natural and makes great road base.
Unfortunately a pivot pin cracked and dropped out of the excavator, so I'll have to make another before continuing.  
Pete
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Jun 13th, 2011, 10:09am
No fair!  The rest of us don't have access to earthmoving equipment!
Seriously, quite a lot of progress to show!  I saw that you were getting some aluminum rail extruded.  What alloy will they use?  Can you get it heat treated to T6 hardness?
Dan
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 14th, 2011, 5:37am
Dan, I don't have access to earthmovers, thats why I bought one I took the giant risk of selling my nice 3 bedroom house in civilisation, and built a two room shed in the boonies. That excavator roughly equals one bedroom The rail order takes out another bedroom. I hope this all works cos I don't think it can be traded back.
I dont have a spec for the ally, so now I'm worried. What are the possible alloys? I'll  try to see what's available. The samples are ready for collection so I'll need to act fast. Pete
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Jun 14th, 2011, 9:33am
I think most of the AL rail sold here is 6061 with T6 hardness.  6061 is a pretty common alloy.  The most desirable properties are hardness and wear resistance.
 
A comment (not meant as a criticism): your rail proportions are a little different than what is typically seen here.  The rail head width (15 mm) is a little wider in proportion to the rail height.  Typically this would be a proportion of 1:2.  Also the web thickness (8 mm, if I read your sketch correctly) is a little thicker than usual.  I don't see any problem with either of these, other than this will increase the unit cost per meter length.
 
Have a look at this data sheet on rail cross sections: http://www.unitracrail.com/pdfs2007/Track_Components_Section.pdf
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 18th, 2011, 3:10am
Just got the rail sample. It says that its 6106 T6 which means I can give a huge sigh of relief- thanks Dan.   Its real tough, I tried propping one end on the concrete slab and drove the car over it and it didn't have any effect. Now I will have to make a stronger rail bender as  the one in the pic probably wont cut the ice.  
The thicker than scale dimensions were an effort to make it resistant to damage and wear. The thick rib shouldn't be visible and the wider top is still narrower than the wheels, so oil should stay off. Thats the theory anyway, time will tell
Pete
Posted by: ac16 Posted on: Jun 18th, 2011, 8:08am
Hi all,
Good progress there Pete, and the rail looks the part and strong - thank god. The reason for the heavy rail is as Pete only really has 2 other blokes helping him out with track laying and maintenance so the less he has to worry about replacing things the better. Also in Australia there is a wee bit of resistance to aluminium rail so we figured if we are going to make a good case for it we’d better make sure it was almost indestructible.  
In yards and for the points I believe we are going with welded up black steel bar. At the minute I am coming up with the design for the trailable facing points with indicator, proving fun as I need something that locks across while train passes through then flicks back… (ingenuity don’t fail me now) will post up when finished.
Somemore pic’s and I m rather surprised that Pete didn’t mention the HUGE Waterfall over which we are planning a fairly sizeable bridge - think it worked out at 18 meters.
 


 
Regards
Rob
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Jun 18th, 2011, 9:21am
Now THAT is a feature that many of us envy.... Just to have water - stream, pond, ditch - is very desireable, but falling water? That's an order of magnitude up the scale.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: ac16 Posted on: Jun 18th, 2011, 9:40am
Hi Greg
 
What is more annoying was we didn’t know it was there when Pete bought it (something about him being scared of snakes and other bitey things ) so it wasn’t until I came up (much like Indiana Jones) for a visit we discovered A) the waterfall B) the sandstone cliffed (2m high in spots) creek that leads to it.  
 
Running idea as it stands (Pete may correct me ) is that the line will loop around the house trundle down the paddock to about the half way point at around 1:80 horse shoe back to the site of the main station (still falling away at around 1:80) then head into the bush and skirt along the sandstone cliff, at around 1:100, to the waterfall and bridge over it, then just on the other side of said waterfall is going to be the terminus and Y to turn the loco around the consist. If we get enough people this side of the pond interested we are hoping to have some miniature bush industries turn up at this location.
At this stage we are looking at 3 passing loops (including the main station) 3 of which will have Trailable facing points operating them (thus meaning we can have trains passing (using staff and ticket of course) without anyone getting off a loco and changing any points.
Some more pic's
Looking down to waterfall water hole pic2
Trailable facing points we are modeling

 
Rob
Posted by: ac16 Posted on: Jun 18th, 2011, 9:51am
Map of Route (last time i checked anyway)
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Jun 18th, 2011, 11:43am
Hi Pete,
I'm glad your rail sample came through with the "right" alloy and hardness.  And I understand completely about the rationale on the proportions.
 
The waterfall is a pretty amazing and unique feature to incorporate into the RR.  To echo Pockets, we are all very envious of this natural attraction you have.  In the cajun french part of Louisiana, this would be called lagniappe, or something extra thrown in that was not expected.
 
Here's a photo of the track used by club I belong to (Chattanooga Society of Live Steamers) that has a similar feature of a rock outcropping (but no waterfall).  The reason the same train (my Davenport locomotive) appears twice is that it is a panorama of two photos spliced together.
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Jun 18th, 2011, 12:24pm
Here's an option for you to consider.  Some logging RRs here in the US would lay track right across a stream bed rather than building a bridge.  An example is illustrated in this drawing my daughter did, based on a composite of several photos of logging railroads.  You could run your track on the ledge above the waterfall, so you would get a view "looking over the edge" as you cross the stream.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 19th, 2011, 3:04am
Nice drawing of the Climax. That bridge looks like Eagle Point, a website that I visit regularly. Now thats what I call hard work, but what a result!
Rob, where's those two blokes you mentioned were helping? They haven't shown up yet Yes that plan is still current, but it's still uncharted territory so exact details are a bit hazy.
The tramways way up North have rails laid in the creeks (The Savannalander still crosses one near Forsayth) and I planned a creek run as part or the drain now under construction.(too risky to use the actual creek} Watch this space!
The waterfall has been named "Rob's Downfall", because he did
This is my snake scaring crew
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Jun 19th, 2011, 11:36am
Thanks for the compliment on the drawing.  My daughter does nice work for not being a railfan  
 
Yes, that is indeed Eagle Point.  The Tracey City branch (where the bridge is located) is my favorite piece of the RR.
 
About "Rob's Downfall", I hope that's not how the waterfall was discovered!  This reminds me of another famous location in Florida.  We'll have to get Bruce the Lesser to explain how "Raykiewicz Landing" by the high trestle on the Buckinham Central got its name  
 
A question, you refer to "trailable facing points".  Is this the same as what we in the U.S. would call a "spring switch"?  Meaning that the points, if aligned for the wrong path, don't have to be moved to the correct position when going through them in the direction where the two tracks converge into one?  (Difficult to put into words without using the terms "facing" or "trailing".)
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Jun 20th, 2011, 8:10am
Pete,
Regarding the aluminum alloys, I looked up the physical properties of 6061 and 6063 (another common alloy) and here is what I found:
 
6063
Tensile strength (T6, T651)       241       MPa       35000       psi
Yield strength (T6, T651)          214       MPa       31000       psi
Elongation (T6, T651)                 12       %           12       %
Shear strength (T6, T651)        152       MPa       22000       psi
Fatigue strength (T6, T651)       69       MPa       10000       psi
Hardness (T6, T651)                  73       HB          73        HB
 
6061
Tensile strength (T6, T651)       310      MPa       45000       psi
Yield strength (T6, T651)          276      MPa       40000       psi
Elongation (T6, T651)                 12      %           12       %
Shear strength (T6, T651)        207      MPa       30000       psi
Fatigue strength (T6, T651)       97       MPa       14000       psi
Hardness (T6, T651)                  95       HB          95       HB  
 
Quite a big difference between the two alloys, especially the hardness!
Posted by: ac16 Posted on: Jun 20th, 2011, 9:56am
Hi,
 
well i didnt fall, more a holy heck who put that drop there!
 
Ok basics of trailable facing points (pete is still getting his head around them) is as follows:
 
The points counter weight is locked into Normal running position (eg correct road), however back from the counter weight is a dampening device (a shock absorber if you will) which allows trains from wrong road to pass through the points (pushing the blade across) the indicator shows that the points return back after the last car has passed the points.
 
now the fun part
 
If in an emergancy the wrong road must be taken the counter weight can be unlocked and the points can be set for wrong road... however if a train trys to come through from the correct road and "trail through" the points when set against them to wrong it will not be able to push the blades across (eg the dampener will not activate) and  you are left with a derailed train (that said the indicator shows that the road is against you.
 
What is the point of this? it's to idiot proof the passing loops and ballon loop (eg wrong road can only be activated with a key) to avoid collisions or misadventures. Also it is fairly unique to australia - only other place i know of using a similar system in place is in golly old germany.
 
 
Hope this helps
 
Rob
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Jun 20th, 2011, 7:19pm
Pete,
Although not a current operation, the two-foot gauge Mt. Gretna (1890 - 1914) used a reversing -baloon- loop on the mountain at it's outer end. That's their #15 in my signature photo.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 1st, 2011, 8:11am
Just a quick update. This is reply #9 tidied up and roadbed base in. One of the two road crossings will go here, probably steel bar rail, welded to reo mesh and cast into concrete. The alloy rail is due any day, but I will need to make a serious bending roller as this stuff don't bend by hand.
What do you guys use for bending?
Pete
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Jul 1st, 2011, 11:47pm
I don't have a photo, but at Eagle Point we use a slip roll type bender.  The rollers are about as wide as the height of the rail, and machined to fit the profile of the rail.  There is a crank handle on one of the rollers, so the rail can be cranked through.  Once set for the desired radius, a single pass through is all it takes.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Jul 2nd, 2011, 6:44am

 
   Hi Pete,
 
   Sorry that I did'nt respond quicker to the huge amount of progress that you've made. HOLY HANNA, your moveing right along,,,,, in a hurry.
 
   As to the "Raykiewicz Falls" story, I'll just have to put it together for all to read and enjoy shortly.
 
   Again, I'm impressed with all of the work that has been done, You'll be running sooner than you think.
 
   Bruce
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 4th, 2011, 11:45pm
Next workshop job is to start making tools (like the roller) and jigs and drilling templates, etc.   Meanwhile I had a delivery. Not sure whether I'm excited or scared . Man that looks like a lifetime of work.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 4th, 2011, 11:53pm
Even the neighbours came out for a look.    Mom, Dad and 2.4 kids  (0.4 is in the pouch)
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 5th, 2011, 12:04am
Another new toy thanks to ebay, a laser level. Trying to get my head around the issue of getting down the hill from the house. I've started dumping fill for the embankment and aim to use a trestle for partway. If I can keep the height below 1 meter (3 feet and a bit) then it wont need handrails.  Here's some "Clam Lake" red lines painted on.
Posted by: Boulder Creek Posted on: Jul 6th, 2011, 7:57pm
G'day Pete,
 
Your railway is looking fantastic! I'll have to bring my loco up for a run one day!
 
Regards,
Dave.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 15th, 2011, 5:40am
Dave, when you come up you might like to bring some of your extensive electrics knowledge with you.....and a sledge hammer to knock it into me
 
 
Spent an interesting weekend in northern New South Wales looking at alloy track and a couple of private tracks. Outcome is that I might re-prep the top loop with a larger radius, to minimise chopping out the railhead.  Interestingly the park kiddy ride people worked out that when the railhead wore, they use a circular saw, in a trolley jig,and ally blade, to cut off the inner head back to the web, then fixed a steel strip in. Very ingenious , and has been there for several years now, running 1/2 ton locos.
Pete
 
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 16th, 2011, 4:22am
Raining today so started on jigs. This is my method for tie fixing.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 16th, 2011, 4:24am
If the final tie gets a golden spike, what does the first one get?
 
This is one of the "offcuts" from the sawmill. Not only is it as hard as nails, but they also docked the lot to length and still only charged  firewood price. I'll soak them after drilling, but I doubt whether much will get in.  
The guys down South spread cow dip on the track once a year....aparently it kills any bugs including termites.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 16th, 2011, 4:34am
Not all beer and skittles though.  Got the orange shovel out this afternoon, but something went bang. Guess what my job tonight is
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Jul 16th, 2011, 5:23pm
Pete,
I wouldn't worry about rail wear on your track.  The park train probably gets run a LOT, and a private track not so much.  I'm not saying you shouldn't increase the radius of your track, but that should be based on operational requirements, not rail wear concerns.  A couple of things that will help is to increase the gauge a little on the curves, and raise the outside rail somewhat (superelevation).  Others can chime in on how much.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 17th, 2011, 8:14am
A quick U-tube tutorial on "vertical up welding on 1/2" plate" and we're back in business.
Truth is, I wasn't 100% happy with the driveway crossings, so the new alignment gives another 2 metres on the radius and a better grade crossing.....Bob, the map's out of date now
Meanwhile in the shop, the rail bender is in progress.  Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 31st, 2011, 6:40am
I found the pic of the train "through the creek" similar to what Dan Watson's Climax picture showed. It was done so that floods would go over the rails. A cheaper alternative to a bridge, on a line where a few days wait was not considered a big deal
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 31st, 2011, 6:49am
Meanwhile I bumble along making tools. I picked up some 25 x 12 (1" x 1/2") steel bar, for turnouts etc, and it looked a bit tough to bend, so the rolling machine got toughened up a bit. This is the frame with rail in place,waitng for the bearings and shafts to be installed. Pretty it ain't
Pete
Posted by: ac16 Posted on: Aug 2nd, 2011, 2:48pm
hmmm me thinks, pete, the map is becoming a joke
 
rail bender looks pretty chunky and i like the new allignment. BTW where did you pick up those sprockets from, (need some for harplings 0-4-0)?
 
Rob
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 3rd, 2011, 6:17am
Chunky, eh!    Well here it is with the chunky bits painted in pretty hammer finish
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 3rd, 2011, 6:22am
And a closer view. That rail doesnt stand a chance against this baby!
Sprockets from Bearing Supplies (multi function soft centres so you can turn them out to your favourite bore).  Chain from the same place, but dear as poison.
I cut the kitchen chairs down to make feed supports, will try it at the weekend.
Pete
Posted by: ac16 Posted on: Aug 3rd, 2011, 8:03am
very nifty bit of kit mate. rail better hold up or im a dead man...
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Aug 3rd, 2011, 5:49pm
  Hi Pete,
 
   Thats a nice piece of inventiveness. I like that!!
 
   Bruce R.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 4th, 2011, 4:58am
Thanks guys.....it made a bit of room in the junk box too
Next is to copy the club automatic gauge improver.  Used when laying track. The idea is the triangle sits on straight track exactly at gauge. The outside rail is first secured to the ties. When the jig is placed with the long side on the outside of a curve, the inside rail will be set easy gauge and is ready to be screwed or welded .  Ideally the long side should be the same length as your longest fixed wheelbase, then the gauge increase will suit all your stock.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 4th, 2011, 5:02am
The other jig is the "superelevator". Self explanitory, but I think I might try for a simpler version.
Beside it is the "persuader" for rotating the track to the correct cant.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 6th, 2011, 3:38am
So here's the rolling rig at work. Steel bar slowed it down but results are A1
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 6th, 2011, 3:41am
And the outcome for todays effort.....One grade crossing ready to plant and concrete in place.    My very first track panel
Posted by: ac16 Posted on: Aug 6th, 2011, 9:14am
That looks really good mate, light work of things
 
Rob
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 17th, 2011, 3:02am
Been a bit quiet here lately. Here's a progress shot taken from the other end of "reply 37".  The old alignment (where the cat is, er, fertilising)will now be a siding, while the main, on the right, will become a station.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 17th, 2011, 3:09am
The house passed its final building inspection without a wimper   so now I can dig holes and rearrange things .  The station will need water and drainage for the water tower, and power for the lights. Later it will get a canopy and also a coal stage.
Pete
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Aug 17th, 2011, 6:31pm
hey pete!
 
keep the good stuff coming!  ya doin' good friend...just make sure your junk bin stays full so you can keep building stuff.
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Aug 17th, 2011, 7:10pm
on Aug 4th, 2011, 5:02am, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
The other jig is the "superelevator". Self explanitory, but I think I might try for a simpler version.Pete

 
Pete, how about some more pictures of this tool?  I would like to see the lower part in a couple of different views.  Right now, we use the belly flop and stare as our sighting tool with a level for elevation changes.
 
Tom C.
Posted by: ac16 Posted on: Aug 18th, 2011, 1:08am
Looking good there mate
 
Rob
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 18th, 2011, 4:21am
Tom,  it's a pendulum basically. There's a bearing at the top of the A frame(I can live without that) and a plastic trough which acts as a damper when filled with water, half way down (I can live without that too .
At the bottom is a plumb bob weight and a scale, which could read degrees or radius, etc. It sits on a baseplate on the track and you read off the really big numbers without stooping.  The accuracy might be a bit suspect in Wyoming or Chicago if the wind gets behind it
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 28th, 2011, 2:52am
Time to dig up the driveway and lay the crossing. Ready for concrete next Saturday. Theres a pad for the station too.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 28th, 2011, 3:07am
Station prep
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 28th, 2011, 3:13am
It will be a small wayside halt, like this one, with basic water and coal facilities. Its other purpose is to hold garden tools and the rider mower, freeing up some workshop space/
Pete
Posted by: 6491 Posted on: Sep 3rd, 2011, 10:25pm
G,day Pete....well how's the body going after the concrete pour? You are certainly putting in some work there. Thought I might have caught you at Grandchester or Track & Tent, though looking at the work you are getting done I can see where you were.
Have a good one and keep on tracking....John(southpass).
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 4th, 2011, 3:11am
Hi John. Sent you a pm. My back hates me, but its done. Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 2nd, 2011, 3:58am
Had a few spare days so did a bit more prep. Station slab, platform ready for final topping, soil, mulch and plants all done. what else does it need? Oh yeah........... track
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 2nd, 2011, 4:02am
And from the other end, prepped station yard. Looks like it's time to see if I can build a turnout for the siding.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Oct 2nd, 2011, 7:18am

 
   Hey Pete,
 
   WOW, I'ved missed a whole bunch of stuff that you've done. Holy mackeral, from rail benders, to earth moveing to drive way construction. And as an old track man, I like that track tool. Thanks for all of the pics.
 
   Bruce R.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 5th, 2011, 3:43am
Couldn't resist trying a couple of track panels. Only 498 to go!
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Oct 5th, 2011, 9:16am
This is developing into a sweet line. People new to the hobby don't appreciate the prep work involved before the first tie hits the ground.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 9th, 2011, 9:10pm
Amen to that!  
The number of workers doubled this weekend. Young Isaac helped haul rail sections and put then through the roller. Seriously tough job for an adult let alone a nine year old. I think he's hooked
Then we bought sleeper ties up from the treatment plant and stacked them for drilling. There should be enough materials for another 80 feet of track next visit.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 19th, 2011, 2:21am
A bit more progress. Tidy station area
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 19th, 2011, 2:28am
And some prep into the start of the serpentine. Lots of fill needed for the embankment in the distance behind the tank.  
I rechecked my calculations and found a mistake in the grades. doh!
To fix it, I've lowered the station exit, now it's 1 in 40 (2 1/2%) then goes into the serpentine at 1 in 50 (2%) but at 18metre (55 ft) radius. That'll sort out the engineers from the boys
Pete
Posted by: JWB46 Posted on: Oct 19th, 2011, 5:59am
Good day Pete....I have got to give you full points for getting things done
Looking good.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 23rd, 2011, 4:34am
Talking of points , another weekend draws to a close following construction of the first switch, using Dave's "Boulder Creek" method.
Following rough setout using alloy stock, the offsets are marked on the 2 by 4, then outer rails tacked to bar sleeper ties.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 23rd, 2011, 4:38am
Assembly transferred to forklift (adjustable stand!) and the infill bits done.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 23rd, 2011, 4:43am
A coat of rusty rail paint, and timber ties fixed on. (the closure rails will be added later when I work out how to machine them) and lifted out on to site with the excavator. The "head of rail" moves slowly forward
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 23rd, 2011, 4:48am
Another hi-tech special tool joins the arsenal. A starter rebar with a 5/16 socket welded on the end. Allows the track screws to be set tight with drill, then backed off half a turn to allow the expansion movement.
Pete
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 23rd, 2011, 9:57am
Pete,  the track work looks fantastic.  It's great to see , a young live steamer.   They are the future of the hobby.  Thank you for posting the pics. Ray III
Posted by: Boulder Creek Posted on: Oct 27th, 2011, 6:59pm
Looking fantastic Pete,
 
I'm glad my points construction article has been of use!
For anyone interested, see: Boulder Creek "points construction"  
 
Regards,
Dave.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 3rd, 2011, 5:00am
Spent the morning writing job applications and having thoroughly depressed myself,  I decided to turn the brain off and lay track
The turnout for the workshop road is now ready so it's off the forklift and on to the excavator for the slow trip.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 3rd, 2011, 5:05am
It's a wye of 18m and 15m radii, with a killer grade to the workshop, requiring a vertical bend to the rail straight off the turnout.  Hope it doesn't need a winch!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 3rd, 2011, 5:16am
Next challenge is the switch at the start of the embankment. It marks the connection of the balloon loop, which is all prepped and ready for tracklaying.
Unfortunately I've used all the sleeper ties so will have to go scrounging in town, but meanwhile there's lots of rail that can be bent and painted and drilled, (and the people power rig to finish, 2 wagons and a carriage to build, a steamer to finish...........yeah, right )
This is head of steel, with the balloon prep hiding behind the top wire of the fence.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 13th, 2011, 7:36pm
I tried making points closers (the tapered bits ) using a small angle grinder, but it was a drag.  Fortunately my neighbour, who is a fitter and turner at a coal mine, offered me an end mill to try.
Long story and much head scratching, but this is what I came up with. 4 inches at a time, took about 7 hours machine time, but the result is good and the cost is my favourite, zip
Pete
 
 
ps He's getting me some coal too
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 25th, 2011, 2:04am
Struck gold at a backstreet woodyard.   30 lengths of "coathangers". OK quality, real cheap, and the bends don't matter.
I've foolishly called an open day on Sat 10th Dec so now there's a scramble to complete the balloon in time. I must be mad
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 10th, 2011, 9:14pm
Just a quickie from the Saturday open day. I'll post some track pics soon. This is some of the guests checking out the railmotor. That track was laid on Thursday and ballasted on Friday night
Pete
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Dec 10th, 2011, 11:09pm
cool!  glad to see the railmotor out on the line!  keep up the good work.
 
moose
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 11th, 2011, 4:03am
Hi Moose,  Actually it was the steamer that christened the line. It did two laps, then started loosing water out of the firebox. Turned out to be the syphon tube, but still requres boiler out. Didn't get a pic cause I was kinda ticked off
However, here's the opened balloon loop. The group had a great day, lots of smiles and plenty of food and cheer.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 11th, 2011, 4:06am
more
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 11th, 2011, 4:08am
more
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 11th, 2011, 4:09am
still more
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 11th, 2011, 4:12am
End of stage one and start of trestle
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 11th, 2011, 4:21am
The ladies dsappeared to check the neighbours prize garden, which left the men with nothing to do but sit around!
Posted by: JWB46 Posted on: Dec 11th, 2011, 4:34am
G,day Pete....glad the day went well for you. The track is looking great.  
When I get over present issues I am hoping to get over and see your operation
Posted by: Boulder Creek Posted on: Dec 18th, 2011, 7:23pm
Looking great Pete,
 
Keep the pictures coming!
 
Dave.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 25th, 2011, 4:52am
Seems the open day was a good idea. There is a work party next week and the track has some real nice, scale point levers being made. (bit too nice to leave out, but great for photo shoots)
Also fixed the excavator after I rolled it, and have landed a job for the new year. Things are looking up.
Celebrated by building the chassis for the "country coach", pics later
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 25th, 2011, 4:57am
and
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 30th, 2011, 5:29am
Had a huge storm which washed out the car park into the station. Didn't want that again so raised the carpark to direct the rain away. Used some of the rocks for a little retaining wall. Good outcome!   (compare with reply no. 67)
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 30th, 2011, 6:02am
One of the open day crowd, Scotty, turned up on Wednesday with lunch, mother and chainsaw.  Since he is not scared of snakes and dragons and things that go bump in the night, it was decided to attack the forest.
End of day and several tons of fire timber later and theres nearly 300 yards of track prep done.  Amazing what can be achieved when friends turn up.
Pete
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Dec 30th, 2011, 7:15pm
on Dec 30th, 2011, 5:29am, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Had a huge storm which washed out the car park into the station. Didn't want that again so raised the carpark to direct the rain away. Used some of the rocks for a little retaining wall. Good outcome!   (compare with reply no. 57)
Pete

 
Pete that is a beautiful stone retaining wall and landscaping. It is the little details that make the difference.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 18th, 2012, 3:46am
Not much progress lately, I'm too busy fixing all the stuff that broke  The boiler got its new pipe and was pressure tested today.  Firebox has been relined in fireclay, so the rebuild can get under way.  All these new skills to learn!
The paint job suffered so I'm trying this time with professional auto paint in aerosol cans, so far it looks a superior finish but its not cheap. This is the shop looking more like a junk yard, and a glimpse of the country coach chassis.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 18th, 2012, 3:53am
There are several large dangerous trees in the bush. This widow-maker wont be a problem any more, but it didn't half come down with a bang!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 18th, 2012, 4:00am
Near to the waterfall the bush gets quite thick. Swinging a 60ft curve gets interesting. I'd hate to be doing this without the orange shovel.
Peter
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Feb 18th, 2012, 9:18am
on Feb 18th, 2012, 3:46am, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Not much progress lately, I'm too busy fixing all the stuff that broke  The boiler got its new pipe and was pressure tested today.  Firebox has been relined in fireclay, so the rebuild can get under way.  All these new skills to learn!
The paint job suffered so I'm trying this time with professional auto paint in aerosol cans, so far it looks a superior finish but its not cheap. This is the shop looking more like a junk yard, and a glimpse of the country coach chassis.

 
 
hey pete, whatta ya mean the shop is a mess?  ya can still see the floor!!!  can't do that in my shop.  
 
please, please let's see some more of the country coach.  believe it or not, i get a opportunity to learn from what you are doing...and i enjoy it.  the BVT is on my 'bucket list' for things to do or places to visit as soon as i retire.  who knows, maybe we could organize a 'railfan.net' group tour!?   well, something to think about.  what a motley cruise it would turn into!  
 
keep the pics coming and have fun growing the railroad.  a finished railroad (well, they're never finished...really)is wonderful, but i've learned that i enjoy being in on the challenges of how, where and why of right of way planning.  there's something about putting down rails where they've never been before.
 
keep up the good work!
 
moose
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 19th, 2012, 3:45am
 
 The kind gentleman who helped with the boiler repair, is 84years old and his shed is like Alladin's cave. I reckon has has one unfinished project for each year of his life (plus the 1-1 roller in the front yard) but there's barely room for one person to work
Group tour.....no problem....what would you like for breakfast?  Looks like I'm back at work for six months at least, then the pension should kick in and I can get some trainplay in again.
Thanks for your compliments. My progress would have been much, much slower without this forum and all the help and encouragement. I try to listen to all the comments.....then I go away and do it my way
This is what you get from the archives
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 19th, 2012, 4:15am
Early Queensland had some problems with vast distances, impassible terrain, and major budget restrictions  (bit like the BVT, eh!)  so came up with train specs different to what you are used to.
All country trains ran mixed, but the guard didn't get a caboose to himself, instead he had to share it with passengers, or at times with sheep or milk cans. Later when train brakes came in, the layout persisted.
3'6" gauge was the first mainline narrow gauge in the world, and worked so well that it still exists, albeit with tilt rains. Narrow gauge meant sharp curves and steep hills, so my country coach has small wheels and bogie truck centres very near the ends, to prevent buffer locking on 200ft curves.
End doors, double roof and cast iron work were all hallmarks of the tropics, as were the 2 class seating and (indoor!) toilets. No beds or kitchens then as trains only operated in daytime. The guard frequently also looked after passing train movements, as there were no signals, only staff and ticket.
Wagons were built to the skimpiest of plans and frequently varied to suit the intended line, so the panelled CV (combination brake van) became stick sided CLV (2 lavatory toilets added).
This van in a local museum has similar parts, so is good for dimensioning.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 19th, 2012, 4:54am
Enough of history.  I plan to operate sort of of like the original, so brakes will only be on the back vehicle, using a remote control (via garage door button) for one man op. Also, all my wagons will be rideon-enabled so need to be built tough.  Frame is 40mm angle (8" timber) with ply body and ally roof. Bogies are my internally bearinged, two stage sprung beams with  non functioning axlebox bits.  Sprung buffers and 3 link couplins (love those huge "Mickey Mouse" buffers)
Internally a part removable roof with cooler box and seat for one.  
Here it is so far, with my drawings pinned to the wall (only room for half length elevation)
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 28th, 2012, 4:16am
I've decided to build a plywood carcase and clad it in aluminum, so here's the "box". The centre section will be for one or two seats.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 10th, 2012, 1:11am
Waiting for the cladding, thought Id start yet another job....the station. (I do things a/ when  can afford to b/ when I have materials, and c/ when Im in the mood
Promoted the orange shovel to orange crane and lifted some panels in.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 10th, 2012, 1:13am
And finished with some beam balancing. At least its progress.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 18th, 2012, 2:53am
Continuing with the station. Nearly clad and ready for roof and canopy
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 18th, 2012, 3:02am
An offer from a neighbour, of this shelter means some more space in the workshop. My son and a friend helped and three of us moved and rebuilt this in four hours, in the rain It's in the bush, next to the right of way, away from prying planning officers. Its next to the creek so will make a nice bar b que spot, and if all else could house the sleeper treatment plant (or hooch still  )
When the station is usable, all the garden tools and mower will go in there , leaving enough room to swing a cat in the workshop
Pete
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Mar 18th, 2012, 10:40am
on Mar 18th, 2012, 3:02am, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
An offer from a neighbour, of this shelter means some more space in the workshop. My son and a friend helped and three of us moved and rebuilt this in four hours, in the rain
When the station is usable, all the garden tools an mower will go in there and be out of the shop, leaving enough room to swing a cat
Pete

 
Ah, the ancient art of Australian Cat Swinging!!! I look forward to the pictures!
 
Seriously, you have very nice neighbors. The carport is a great and useful addition.  
 
Bobby
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 9th, 2012, 2:06am
Ah, Easter...4 days to work on the job list. A bit of detailing on the station.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 9th, 2012, 2:09am
Then back to the planned job, trestle building. An offer of help didn't happen so the one man crew made a start. Should have waited as didn't look where I was going. Dented pride , sore hip but no damage to the orange shovel.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 9th, 2012, 2:16am
Tonka toy breakdown crew to the rescue.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 9th, 2012, 2:18am
And a quick snatch with the Hilux. Now where was I? Ah yes, trestle bents to be dug.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 9th, 2012, 2:24am
Progress was not quite what I expected but OK for the scared and wounded   All the centre posts done (to ensure even curve) but many outers still to concrete in.
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Apr 9th, 2012, 5:12am
Good to see that you survived.
 
As you know "Good judgement comes from experience, experience comes from bad judgement."
 
I really like to follow your project - keep up the good work.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 30th, 2012, 4:35am
Progress, slow but sure. Loco coming back together and country coach moving along slowly
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 30th, 2012, 4:40am
Loco all in one piece again (going out for a run this weekend) and carriage on its wheels
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 30th, 2012, 4:46am
Speaking of wheels, this is the bogie (truck) "carcase" with self aligning bearings and two stage springs. Later a dummy cosmetic layer will be added, with leaf springs and axleboxes.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 30th, 2012, 4:49am
And a close up showing that there is still a little articulation. A shim washer between the halves of the bearing carrier prevents the bearing from being "nipped up"
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 30th, 2012, 4:53am
Lastly, especially for Bobby, the "swinging" Australian Cat in the workshop
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Apr 30th, 2012, 3:32pm
The chooch is looking nice and I really like that little station.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Apr 30th, 2012, 6:22pm
on Apr 30th, 2012, 4:53am, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Lastly, especially for Bobby, the "swinging" Australian Cat in the workshop

 
Every good shop should have one!  
 
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 31st, 2012, 4:32am
Spent a very satisfying day at the club, carting the public for charity. (we don't normally do public)
Anyhow, several members bought carriages, one set used an airbrake system recently marketed by DNC Systems (shameless plug )
It works by remote control using garage door remotes and performed really well on the two riding cars. Just the thing for Jamaican bobsleds
As I was planning brakes for the country coach, this seemed the way to go.  
Here's a pic of some of the bits I've collected.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 31st, 2012, 4:46am
Needs a car battery (exterally charged)  
12volt air compressor
Tank, possibly old fire extinguisher or propane tank, I recycled an airbrush kit
Control box, with on-off switch, pressure switch and solenoid valve.
Air ram 25mm x 20mm, one per bogie truck.
I wish to operate coach independant of train so I added a manual ball valve which can be turned on for train brakes to other wagons.
 
To operate you take one of the remotes back to the loco and if you need a touch of brake you hit the bottom button. The brakes stay on as long as you hold the button.
If you hit the middle button, the brakes go on and stay on until you hit the top button to release.
I have finally handed in my notice, so next month I commence a life of stress free trainplay, slowed only by the poverty that accompanies retirement
Pete
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Jun 1st, 2012, 7:45pm
CONGRATS ON RETIREMENT!

 
....most of us are jealous of you!  
 
now you'll have time for more projects...and like the rest of us...you won't be able to afford them!  ....well, at least you'll have the time to post more about the projects you can't afford.  'that's how we do it.
 
pete, enjoy a little bit of time not doing anything.  after that, you'll be busier than when you were working. ...make sure you stay that way!
 
...9 more years for me...daumn long time.....
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 28th, 2012, 5:04am
One day to retirement and the boss tells me I cant go cos my replacement lost his licence for 3 months. Compromise is I'll do 3 days a week until he's back. Railroad empire on hold again.
Meanwhile it's mid winter here. This is what paradise looks like on the shortest day
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 28th, 2012, 5:14am
Seeing Tom's efforts spurs me on so some work on the carriage.
This is the aluminium sides, the matchboarding joints are done with a score-and-snap knife. More score and less snap.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 28th, 2012, 5:15am
And closer
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 28th, 2012, 5:19am
Then the windows get rough cut with anglegrinder. (waterjet or laser would be much quicker )
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 28th, 2012, 5:25am
Then glued to the carcase with contact glue. Next will be to set up a mask for the router and trim the holes to size.
Posted by: Pennsy4483 Posted on: Jun 28th, 2012, 8:45am
Looking great?  Keep up the work and the updates,  Sorry to hear about your retirement delay.
 
Happy Steaming (and building)!
 
Don
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 8th, 2012, 3:13am
Time to get the hands dirty again.   Robert escaped the frozen wastes of Canberra for some sunshine and a dose of train time. Thats him on the left with me on the right posing for his mom.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 8th, 2012, 3:17am
While here he helped to attack the bush on the approach  to the waterfall, setting out a turning triangle. Something I couldn't do on my own cos you can't swing a tape measure in the dense undergrowth. Mainline heads to the left. Note the blue tractor on the back leg.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 8th, 2012, 3:20am
Tractor hasn't moved, but this pic taken with my back to the waterfall. This area will have to be given a big tidy up in a couple of weeks, as there is no access once the track is installed
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 8th, 2012, 3:25am
And a bit more work on the number one important job, the workshop access road. Nearly ready for rail.
Pete.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 12th, 2012, 2:48am
Window mask in place. Way too hard to router a slot, so did a rough cut, slightly undersize, with jigsaw then ran round with router. Easy peasy!
I found a similar carriage article on home machinist, looks like the same methods. Pullman was from Roy Rabbits Comanche track (one of my favourites)
Pete
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Jul 12th, 2012, 8:15am
Templates are your best friend.  We will use one when we cut the windows on the next caboose as the saber saw is to hard to control for a nice straight cut!
 
Tom C.
Posted by: boaterri Posted on: Jul 12th, 2012, 11:07am
Once the track is installed on the turning triangle you should have excellent access to the area for clean out.  Just think of all the "logging trains" you could run........
 
Rick
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 29th, 2012, 11:30pm
Quick update. Logging trains on the tramway.....bring it on. Meawhile there's a few stumps and things that wont fit on trains, so I'll do those first.
Here's a rough of the country coach with windows and 4mm (3/16) alloy roof, sitting on its wheels.
In the foreground is B15, just returned from the boiler inspector with a brand new certificate (issued under the tough new legislation) Woo-hoo!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 29th, 2012, 11:36pm
A chance conversation revealed a friend of my son has a laser cutter and has offered to do the verandah ends for the coach in 1/8th steel
I cant do CAD, so have done some pen and ink drawings that son will transfer to DWF.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 29th, 2012, 11:46pm
Finally, a bit of US content. Some Bettendorf castings from Jim at Boston Loco. Beautifully made and exactly matches my prototype for the future cattle wagons. Exchange rate is working in favour of Oz, but more than 20 lbs creates postal bedlam.
Pete
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Aug 1st, 2012, 7:38pm
hey pete!
 
looks like christmas morning!
 
 
moose
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Aug 7th, 2012, 11:19am
Hi Pete
 
How did it go with the verandah ends?
 
It is hard to read the measurements on your drawing.  
I guessed that the rings are 52mm  
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 8th, 2012, 4:17am
Steen, that's amazing. 52mm spot on.  Here's the first draft Does not reproduce well in jpg, but I now have a solidworks "read only"
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 8th, 2012, 4:21am
The scrolls weren't quite right so I did some more pen and paper  (doh) sketches. I am wating for comments.
Paul also asked what material and thickness. I suggested steel 3mm (1/8th) as brass is crazy expensive.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 8th, 2012, 4:55am
If you are interested, this is the side gate  (its 148mm) high. Pete
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Aug 8th, 2012, 4:16pm
Hi Pete
 
I modelled the S's - that was tuff....
 
I have made an E-drawing that you can find here: https://dl.dropbox.com/u/64541328/Verande_end.EPRT
 
All rings and S's are 2mm & the bars are 4mm. I have worked hard to avoid zero thickens there circles and bars meet.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 12th, 2012, 7:00am
Steen, you must love hard work. I haven't heard back from Paul yet.   Do you have knowledge of lazer cutting? Do you think it can be done with all this detail? Pete
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Aug 13th, 2012, 6:12am
Hi Pete  
 
Not much - but I think that minimum hole sizes are equal to thickness of the material.
 
I had a go at the doors but some thing did not add up.....
 
Have you had a look at the e-drawing?
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 16th, 2012, 3:57am
Drawing looked normal until I left-clicked..... then it changed projections Looks good as isometric.  Can it also make coffee and whistle Dixie . Pete
 
(I'm in awe of things that are more clever than me, and these days that's most things.)
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Aug 16th, 2012, 5:35am
Ohhh yes
 
You can find a viewer here:
http://www.edrawingsviewer.com/
 

 
The gate can be found here; https://dl.dropbox.com/u/64541328/gate.EPRT
 
I miss measures on stuff on the sides.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 1st, 2012, 2:17am
Workshop road finally open. It's a killer grade. Railmotor just lopes up and down, but the steamer is a handfull....full glass, back down with reverser in full forward, draincocks open, and a bit of regulator near the bottom switch.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 1st, 2012, 2:22am
It's Father's Day here, so part of the tribe turned up. This is granddaughter Paeton, saying "Thanks for the ride but where are you gonna sit?"
It was the steamers second time out at home. The first time is when the firebox tube blew out. Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 1st, 2012, 2:31am
No 2 trestle is ready for rail (I did it first because it was in the shade ) The No1 will be quicker now I have the experience, so I'll spend less time in the sun
In the back is the country coach on test, behind the hand cart.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 1st, 2012, 2:37am
This is the real one that I used for reference. Forgot the braces!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 1st, 2012, 2:46am
This is the run in to the next station, which will have double track for passing, and provision for future junction just before the grade crossing.  
 A bit of fills, but then it's in cut for the next 60 metres, so there's plenty of material for the embankment between the trestles. All I have to do is dig it out and move it.....should be done by Xmas
Pete
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Sep 1st, 2012, 6:23am

 
   Hey Pete,
 
   Thats a neat engine and a neat trestle. You sure are making progress with your railroad. Thanks for the pics.    
 
   Bruce R.
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Sep 1st, 2012, 4:26pm
pete:  i can only echo want bruce r said...but to add Wow!  and keep going!
 
btw, there's a new fella on our boards by the screenname of 'ncbqguy'.  he's just moved to tennessee, usa from somewhere up north where it is cold.  he's going to be putting down bar-rail...so be sure to look in on him.  as part of our down-under delegation, hoist a cold one for him once in a while to cheer him on.  i think he will become the go-to source for anything of the cbq.  he's amazed me so far as to the depth of his resource library!
 
moose
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Sep 9th, 2012, 6:04am
That is a really nice  trestle bridge.  
What dose it look like from above?
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 11th, 2012, 4:37am
how far above?
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Sep 11th, 2012, 5:35am
Your height +/- 20cm
Posted by: ncbqguy Posted on: Sep 11th, 2012, 8:12am
I've really enjoyed following the story of the Brisbane Valley Tramway.  
 
On our 5 acre lot in Tennessee we've got rock formations and a streambed too, but pretty much flat slabs peeking out of the soil cover.   No Kangaroos though, just the occasional Deer.
 
It would have been better if you had stuck to the iron barstock rail though....then I could have learned from you as I will be using "goovy track"....bar inserted into slotted ties.    I haven't found any threads yet by someone using it for their railroad although I've seen that a club in Vancouver uses  bar welded to metal ties.
 
When I start my railroad in a couple of months I will journal the adventure.   In my N Scale side of the Hobby I belong to a couple of groups who believe in "Better Modeling through Peer Pressure" and it seems to work here via the internet just as well and I need all the help I can get "staying on track" as it were....
 
Thanks,
Charlie Vlk
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 12th, 2012, 5:27pm
Your height +/- 20cm    
Wasn't sure if you meant aerial shots, like your museum! Google earth doesn't do close-ups in this neck of the woods
I'll do some pics at the weekend when I start the tracklaying.
 
ncbguy. Welcome and thanks for your interest.  Be careful with large scale, it tends to become a hole in the backyard that you throw money into.
I had to move outside as the O gauge empire outgrew the building, what's your excuse
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 15th, 2012, 3:07am
Here you are, Steen.   I even posed some rail on it for you
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 15th, 2012, 3:15am
The other end is on hold as a bird is nesting under the middle bent.  I need it to rain to be able to compact the fill (hasn't rained here for 2 months) then the head of steel will move to station 2  
Pete
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Sep 15th, 2012, 6:29am
  Hey Pete,
 
   Those are some nice looking trestles. Good to see the progress.
 
   Bruce R.
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Sep 15th, 2012, 4:28pm
GD Pete
 
That is looking good.
 
I hope that you will some rain soon - it is OK if you take some of ours...
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 27th, 2012, 3:47am
Charlie, ncbguy, a few links for some night time reading for you.
Personally, I can't get enthusiastic about groovy track, however it is the cheapest to build and ok for backyard. 2nd cheapest apparently, is alum. on timber with steel ladder as 3rd in dollar terms (check Boulder Creek posts for steel ladder construction}.
I'm also not so sure about beautiful scale trucks riding on very unscale track.
 
Pete
 
http://railsystemsco.com/Groovy%20track.htm
http://www.discoverlivesteam.com/magazine/128/index.html
http://www.islandpondrailroad.com/rail/page3.htm
http://www.7-plus-ngm.org/arch1103.htm
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 4th, 2012, 4:15am
Been scrounging at the lumber yard again. 4 loads of #1 quality decking hardwood.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 4th, 2012, 4:17am
Wore out the chinese drop saw halfway through load #3.  
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 15th, 2012, 3:02am
New mitre saw from ebay (12" Hitachi) and the tie plant is back in business.
This is the "bush" end of the process where the ties are dunked and stored. The laundry tub makes a great drainer.
These are mostly track ties, but in the rear are some 4' bridge decking, a hundred or so long ties for switches, and spare trestle bits (you never know when another trestle could appear
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 15th, 2012, 3:09am
Meanwhile the pile at the house (where the electricity is)  doesn't seem to have gotten any smaller.
These are 5" boards (boardwalk rejects) that also need ripping in half.
The pile of ripped ties are stacked waiting for drilling. This wood is too hard for screws without pre-drilling. (Just what you need. Bruce)
Drilling is afternoon work....comfortable chair, little table with the small bench drill, and a glass or two of diluted Johhny Walker
Pete
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Oct 15th, 2012, 8:05am

 
   Holy mackeral!! That sure is one hell of a pile of ties! WOW, that should keep you busy building trackage for quite a while.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 23rd, 2012, 3:13am
Well, finally cleared the driveway. No that's not the same pile, it's another 1000 ties waiting to be drilled
Behind the truck is a bunch of rail, bent and painted.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 23rd, 2012, 3:20am
In the middle of all the heat, there was one day of cold, grey and non-stop rain. Then back to sunshine!  This must have been the rain that Steen promised (hope you enjoyed enjoyed the sunshine day, Steen )
All compacted, dressed up and mulched. Will screw the rail down tomorrow.
Note, each bridge took 46 feet of bolts and over a thousand screws. Man, am I sick of drilling holes!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 23rd, 2012, 3:28am
Another toy to find space for. A friend gave me first option at trade-in price.
Took a while to get it in place, but the floor needed clearing anyway!  
Took a few bites at my Bettendorf castings, but so far I can't loosen the tool shank yet (MT3 whitworth 1/2") Think its been on there a while.
Pete
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Oct 23rd, 2012, 10:00am
Fred, Nice score on the mill.  Very handy to have one.
 
Tom C.
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Oct 25th, 2012, 4:15pm
Thanks for the sunshine day, Pete  
 
We had a Ham Radio Fieldday at a local Light House with 400 contacts...  

 
Keep the news coming..
 
PS After my problems at Parkbanen I found this  

S/S Bjørn
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 9th, 2012, 3:35am
Not much paid work lately, so more time for railroad empire
Station 2 (Aramac) needs a level crossing (thats grade crossing to you) so time to weld 4 bars to some 3/8th reo mesh and call the concrete truck.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 9th, 2012, 3:37am
Ready to plant
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 9th, 2012, 3:39am
And finished product. Needs more dye! Oh well, paving paint will do.
Pete
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Nov 9th, 2012, 1:58pm
  Hey Pete,
 
   Number one, that sure is a lot of diggin. And number two, that sure is a nice looking grade crossing. Always good to see your progress.
 
   Bruce
 
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Nov 9th, 2012, 5:36pm
Pete, nice work.  How deep is the concrete at the crossing?  Any stone under it?  
 
Tom C.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 10th, 2012, 2:26am
Hi, Lots of loose rocks in this section, some up to 6 ft. Very hard on the little digger, but makes for some landscape possibilities in the next corner.
 Thats 5 inch thick concrete which, with the reo, will easily take a large truck without stressing out.  No rocks under, too much labour, I'd rather pay for transit mix and have it done in half an hour.
Meanwhile several turnouts are emerging from the shop.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 10th, 2012, 2:31am
The start of the passing loop for the station
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 10th, 2012, 2:36am
The country coach is on the back burner for a while, so I borrowed the chassis and made a work wagon box for it (could double as a coffin, eh )
20 lengths of rail ready to go on the recently made ties.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 10th, 2012, 2:39am
And I took the rail roller down to head of steel to custom fit the curves.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 18th, 2012, 8:11pm
Nice curves Start of first passing loop at "Aramac Junction" station (all my stations are named after outback tramway "end of line" locations. Aramac is way out west in cattle country)
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 18th, 2012, 8:18pm
It's kinda warm here, into 3 figures by 9 am, so I've been spending time in the shop.  2 switches, one with built-in cattle grid. Need more welding rods
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Nov 18th, 2012, 8:18pm
Nice lookin track work there Pete. Thanks for shareing.
 
   Bruce R
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 18th, 2012, 8:31pm
Hi, Bruce.  Kind words from the "track king"
Bring your shovel, there's still a heap of ballasting and tamping to do
Pete
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Nov 18th, 2012, 9:32pm

 
   Pete,
 
   I'm curious? What kind of stone are you useing. It looks really good in the pics.  
 
   Oh, you don't need my help. It looks like your doing some fine track work. And thanks for the very kind compliment.
 
   Bruce
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 20th, 2012, 9:01pm
The stone is "bluemetal" or crushed blue granite. It's very sharp and hard and is used to resurface highways. That load of stone was bought just after the flood and the pickings were slim due to all the road damage. Normally it comes out 15mm (5/8") but this was reject at 20mm (13/16") and much cheaper. It's clean and takes huge loads without displacing and seems to grip the ties well. Not sure what I'll use next as the 15mm is pricey.
Meanwhile I've messed up the next bit of lawn!
Pete
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Nov 29th, 2012, 11:27am
Hi Pete
 
Great progress.  
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 3rd, 2012, 3:08am
Way too hot for digging, so time to work through the list of smaller jobs. Like tidying No 1 station.Iinstalling the water tank and stand and adding a loco track and goods siding (can't have too many sidings).
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 3rd, 2012, 3:10am
That's better
 
Pete
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Dec 3rd, 2012, 6:35am

 
   WOW, that looks GREAT. Man, you've done one heck of a lot of work there Pete. As I've said before, that track work looks super. really nice.
 
   Bruce R.
Posted by: Boulder Creek Posted on: Dec 19th, 2012, 3:15pm
Looking fantastic Pete,
 
Looks like you've had plenty of time spent working away there!!!
 
Regards,
Dave.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 21st, 2012, 2:31am
Thought you'd deserted us Dave. Good progress there. I love the way you plan so meticulously, I just make it up as I go
 
If nothing breaks, it only costs me $15 a day to dig holes.  The other side of the crossing has "overland flow" which needs to be channelled under the track, so lots of digging, and a bit of "creative Landscape" and rearranged boulders to make it look all pretty.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 21st, 2012, 2:38am
After all that heat there had to be a storm, so much haste required to get soil and mulch stabilised and pebbles into the watercourse.
I got the machine out just before the heavens opened.  The creek works
Another spot that won't need mowing any more!  Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jan 6th, 2013, 2:13am
To complete the Xmas preparations for carting grandkids, I needed to be able to turn the steamer, so a temporary turntable was built in the approximate location for an eventual yard table.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jan 6th, 2013, 2:24am
Using TomC's "end of ROW" turntable as inspiration, plus half a trailer axle, this is what came out.  It's a lot stronger than it looks and handled the steam loco with ease.  To disconnect wagons, turn around, run round the train and couple, took only a few minutes. Very satisfying to watch my sons finally playing trains, having previously shown little interest.
This will be moved to head of steel as the track progresses.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jan 6th, 2013, 2:33am
The next target is to have a "train" for show in May, as I have been invited to run steam during "Beef Week" in Casino, NSW.
This will need the B15 (beef tin )loco,2 cattlewagons and the country coach with Cow sound module!   I need to seriously get into the shop and make chips.
This is progress so far on the Bettendorf trucks, and a huge learning curve on the milling machine. OK it doesn't compare to the major builds of the experts, but it's a set of skills that hasn't previously existed and I haven't scared myself....yet!
Pete
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Jan 6th, 2013, 9:20am
on Jan 6th, 2013, 2:24am, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Using TomC's "end of ROW" turntable as inspiration, plus half a trailer axle, this is what came out.  It's a lot stronger than it looks and handled the steam loco with ease.

Hey Fred,  nice that we could inspire you.  It is neat a simple device can add some much interest to operating the RR.  Please send royalty check to Battle Creek address!  It is interesting that you posted this at this time as Frolin (our web master) got a request for the size of 25 from a person in Germany who wants to emulate it.  The SR&CL reach is expanding beyond Frolin, Pockets & Moose!   Keep the chips flyin!
 
Tom C.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jan 9th, 2013, 5:16pm
Sorry Tom, no royalty checks......I'm calling it the "improved" version
 
Must have missed something. Do you mean the Sandy River 24 on your website?    Your locos are very different with the "vertical stretching" but quite attractive and practical.  A bit of a change for Germans from the usual Koppels and such.
Pete.
 
ps update. The milling machine grabbed and melted a tip, seems it doesn't like swarf buildup from digging down, and yes it's now scared me
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Jan 9th, 2013, 10:48pm
on Jan 6th, 2013, 2:13am, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
To complete the Xmas preparations for carting grandkids, I needed to be able to turn the steamer, so a temporary turntable was built in the approximate location for an eventual yard table.

 
   Man, I really like th look of that stone. I wish that we could aford that kind of rock for our ballast. I guess we'll just have to keep useing the lime stone that we have.
   Keep up the beautiful track work.
 
   Bruce R.  
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Jan 9th, 2013, 11:44pm
on Jan 9th, 2013, 5:16pm, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Must have missed something. Do you mean the Sandy River 24 on your website?    Your locos are very different with the "vertical stretching" but quite attractive and practical.  A bit of a change for Germans from the usual Koppels and such.
Pete.

 
Pete I meant #25 our gas hyd. engine.
 
Tom C.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jan 10th, 2013, 6:28am
on Jan 9th, 2013, 11:44pm, tomc wrote:       (Click here for original message)

 
Pete I meant #25 our gas hyd. engine.
 
Tom C.

 
Ah, that 25
 
Bruce, Nothing wrong with limestone, so long as its sharp, not round.  Granite is mined reasonably locally so has less transport cost. I plan to use crushed limestone as my driveway, as it beds down tight when driven over.
Cheapest here is sandstone, which is useless to hold track in place, but makes good fill, then a thin layer of granite chips over.
 
 "I may be good but at least I'm cheap"
 
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jan 22nd, 2013, 10:22pm
Getting stir crazy hiding in the air conditioning (hottest summer on record)
Ventured out with the orange shovel and a new plan for the creek since discovering an unmovable rock.  "If you can't move it, feature it" so now the creek runs the other way, but the downside is that the fill mountain is mountin'
Plus a little culvert bridge that looks nothing like any on the SRCL
Pete
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Jan 28th, 2013, 3:12pm
Fred,  we do have a short one like that on the SR&CL Ry.  Right at Kat Jct.  We will skip royalaties on that one as we copied some one else there.  Stay cool!  
 
Tom C.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 5th, 2013, 7:36am
Major floods everywhere, but no real damage here. Huge rains have shown a few problems with runoff, and some diversion work has been started, while a track alignment change, further down, will avoid an area that is slow to drain.  
This is the aftermath of partly finished track prep. Should be OK when it dries. Meanwhile I bought an el-cheapo jackhammer to attack "the rock"
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 5th, 2013, 7:47am
This is one of the diversions. It used a fair chunk of the stored fill, and diverts water from the uphill neighbour. A channel where I am standing, carries mine and the neighbours flow, away into the creek before it can drown the right-of-way.
Pete
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Feb 5th, 2013, 7:57am
  Man, you've done one hell of a lot of work there Pete. And, it certainly looks like your plan to divert the run off is mostly working. And thats a good thing, for sure. Thanks for the up dates on your progress. It always a pleasure to see.
 
   Bruce R.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 13th, 2013, 4:38am
Meanwhile in the shop, the bettendorfs are ready to roll. I gave up on inches and 1:8 scale and just fudged it with double bearings and custom springs.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 13th, 2013, 4:41am
Then knocked up a couple of frames. 40mm angle equals 10" timber rails. Provision for single air actuator for train brakes.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 13th, 2013, 4:48am
These cars are for ride-in, so body is mostly aluminiun which scales the original timber body quite well.  There's several parts that were made on the mill.  How did I live without a mill?
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Feb 13th, 2013, 7:00am
  It all looks pretty robust in my eye. Nothing wrong with those trucks by what can be seen in the pic. And nice car too.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 26th, 2013, 5:49am
Bruce,
Thanks for your support, sorry you are turning a page. The world needs grumpy old men who play trains, and there aren't many who can also conquer the dreaded computer.  Hope you will keep lurking.
 
Pete
 
 
 
Oh.....and I painted No 1 cattle wagon!
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Feb 26th, 2013, 9:46am
Paint looks good Pete.  Nice choice on color.  When will paint hit the car in the background?  I will miss Bruce also.
 
Tom C.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 27th, 2013, 7:02pm
Several components got in the "too hard" basket and it got shelved in favour of other pressing projects that were ready to go. Once the second cow car is on the rails, it's next.  My back wont allow outdoor work at the moment.
The red colour was removed from all freight stock and redone in grey, following several crossing crashes  (grey=hi-vis!) so red tags this as vintage.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 23rd, 2013, 5:07am
Bit more shop time. This is cow car No2, slightly different bracing and more detailing.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 23rd, 2013, 5:09am
It even has airbrakes. Still got a way to catch up with your standards though, Tom.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 23rd, 2013, 5:15am
Wiped the cobwebs off the steamer and took the cattle train for a lap or two.     Nothing broke!
Pete
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Mar 23rd, 2013, 8:14pm
Looks great Pete!
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Mar 23rd, 2013, 9:12pm
on Mar 23rd, 2013, 5:15am, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Wiped the cobwebs off the steamer and took the cattle train for a lap or two.     Nothing broke!
Pete

 
pete:  ditto what bobbyt said...wow!   i hope i can retire soon!  wanna see this one in-person.
 
 
moose
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 8th, 2013, 6:55am
National Convention of Live Steamers came to town. I took a few days to follow part of the trail.
This is a collection of Queensland locos at the very tidy roundhouse, (QSMEE).
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 8th, 2013, 7:05am
and a nicely made van similar to my country coach.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 8th, 2013, 7:08am
At a private track, some train swapping was going on.  Barry on my cattle train.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 8th, 2013, 7:11am
While I piloted a US imported diesel (ran beautifully but boring to drive.)
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 8th, 2013, 7:24am
My favourite was this XPT diesel. This one is dual gauged and spent some time at Train Mountain in 2009. It uses the mechanicals of a rice harvester (mini combine header)and the driver sits fully inside, even able to see also through the windscreens.   It's definately now on my Xmas list
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 8th, 2013, 7:44am
Much to my surprise, a whole bunch of people turned up at the Tramway for a tour and introduction. Apparently word had got around that it was worth a look.  The goup includes three interstaters and a couple of internationals.....wow!
 
Pete
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Apr 8th, 2013, 9:32pm
Thanks for the update Pete. That is a very tidy engine house indeed.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 20th, 2013, 9:51pm
Had some help yesterday. An un-meet to do some bush clearing in the morning, a bbq lunch, then some playtime.
This is "scaredy-cat gap". Named due to the number of unwelcome wildlife sightings as you travel between two large fallen trees.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 20th, 2013, 9:54pm
And the same area now, ready for tracklaying. (and only one critter, a large black scorpion)
We removed and burnt several tons of deadwood and weeds, it's now a pleasant country scene.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 20th, 2013, 10:07pm
The trailer crew take a break to check out two locos that haven't previously run here.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 20th, 2013, 10:12pm
While others went looking for photo oportunities.  
A good day had by all
Pete
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Apr 21st, 2013, 8:19pm
cool!  keep it coming pete!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 7th, 2013, 11:13pm
And this is what all that prep is for.  TRACK, 250 feet of it
 
The cutting, with rock wall and gardens (the mountain of fill will be shipped to new track prep areas, eventually.)
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 7th, 2013, 11:15pm
Into the forest. Finally I can work in the shade!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 7th, 2013, 11:22pm
More.
 
Pete.
Posted by: Henry Posted on: May 8th, 2013, 8:51am
Wow! That looks great Pete!
 
Henry
Posted by: tomc Posted on: May 8th, 2013, 7:17pm
Lookin good Pete.  I imagine the shade feels good althou winter is comin to u!
 
Tom C.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 9th, 2013, 3:57am
Thanks guys. Here's another of the diversion channels with little bridge. There will be many more thanks to the saturated subgrade.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 9th, 2013, 4:04am
And here is where the excavator broke through, sank and spent several hours digging itself out.  Having waited several months for the ground to start drying, I gingerly crept up to the edge and dug down, finding hard clay 2 feet down.  Once I work out where to put the slop, I will venture back in and open the trench out to become a deep drain.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 28th, 2013, 4:27am
A break from rain so back into the "breach"
From the pic above, a major change of route is being planned, more later.
Further down, in the swamp, less moves possible as I'm right on the boundary fence.  A lot of water comes in from the neighbour property.
This is the "flood" pic
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 28th, 2013, 4:35am
I'm going to keep the old alignment as a drain. Dig out when no further access required.    
Raise the track by about a foot.  
Make a barrier on the boundary to reduce inflow.
Dig a land drain to lower the water table.
Find a new way of getting to this point by train
 
A layer of roadbase helps reduce the sinking.
This is the same view as of today
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 28th, 2013, 4:37am
And from the other direction.. note the yellow markers disappearing into the scrub for probable future alignment
 
 
Pete.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 31st, 2013, 4:46am
on Aug 8th, 2012, 4:16pm, Steen_Rudberg wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Hi Pete
 
I modelled the S's - that was tuff....
 
I have made an E-drawing that you can find here: https://dl.dropbox.com/u/64541328/Verande_end.EPRT
 
All rings and S's are 2mm & the bars are 4mm. I have worked hard to avoid zero thickens there circles and bars meet.

 
 
Finally got the file converted and sent to the laser people.  Got the result today and it's  AWESOME   I'll have to get back to work on the coach again.
Thanks a million, Steen.    Pete
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: May 31st, 2013, 9:11pm
Holy cow that came out nice!
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Jun 7th, 2013, 2:24pm
Wauuuuu...
 
That looks great -  Nice to see it worked.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 10th, 2013, 7:47pm
While we have the carriage progress, I got a chance to test the new brake system in earnest, hauling 8 passengers at a track with a long steep grade.
The installation takes up underseat space of 14" x 9" and operates by remote control (garage door button) from the loco. The cattle cars are also linked by a selectable train valve.  Whilst it can't do a low pressure application (its either on or off)  a quick stab on the button knocks off excessive speed and becomes quite controllable with practice.
A sound module activated by a mercury switch, lets rip with "stampeding cow noises" if the train jolts. It proved very popular with the crowd (along with the warning that any kid who misbehaved would be end up as hamburgers)  
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 10th, 2013, 8:22pm
And further down in the depths of the swamp... A friend laughingly suggested use tree trunks laid as cordouroy, like they did in the old days.
Since the area is not drying out, I figured I had nothing to lose.  It worked!
A bed of logs gets the digger into the spot, and the slop is dug out to make a drain, and laid on top where it dries like concrete. Here I had to negotiate a tree, so the logs were put under the machine, then moved to the RoW as it progessed.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 10th, 2013, 8:40pm
The same cordouroy road bed ready for grading and base course. (I'll do it later, but now at least its not weather sensitive).  The drain has lowered the water table almost immediately.
Meanwhile the next station (Forsayth) is ready for track, requiring a  passing loop, works siding and the relocated turntable
Pete
Posted by: Henry Posted on: Jun 11th, 2013, 8:49am
Nice job Pete, that's a pretty innovative solution!
 
Henry
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Jun 11th, 2013, 9:57am
on Jun 10th, 2013, 8:40pm, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
, but now at least its not weather sensitive).  The drain has lowered the water table almost immediately.Pete

 
Pete, nice use of small trees.  Are you sure the wet weather won't change the roadbed to a soopy mix when it rains hard and long?  Is the Mud/dirt really good for the sub-base?
 
Tom C.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 12th, 2013, 7:11am
Yes
 
 
 
Well I think so
 
 
 
Maybe
 
 
 
Ok, it's sand not clay (mud) so its only slop when the tide comes in. Provided the water table is kept low then its as strong as a sand castle. Pete
 
 
 
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Jun 12th, 2013, 11:04am
Strong as a sand castle he says!  OH BOY!
 
Tom C.
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Jun 12th, 2013, 6:12pm
on Jun 12th, 2013, 11:04am, tomc wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Strong as a sand castle he says!  OH BOY!
 
Tom C.

 
heh heh!  sometimes ya have to dance with who ya brung!
 
great job, pete.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 3rd, 2013, 3:48am
A bit more track, into the new station, Forsayth
First switch ready to lay, with No2 behind getting a coat of paint
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 3rd, 2013, 3:51am
Switches 1& 2 in place, siding complete to MOW shed. Passing loop in progress.
No 3 switch just arrived by Jamaican Bobsled wagon.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 7th, 2013, 1:03am
But wait, there's more
No3 switch installed, closely followed by another little bridge (this one will have a deck for foot traffic)
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 7th, 2013, 1:16am
Head of steel at No4 switch.  Just the turntable to install and then I'm ready for the next unmeet in 3 weeks,  but for now I've run out of steam, like an old boiler.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 7th, 2013, 1:22am
I did manage to tidy up and detail the station approach. Look like it's been there for years!
Pete
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Jul 7th, 2013, 9:24pm
Pete, nice to see you are making progress.  Have the wife re-fuel the boiler so you can get some steam up!
 
Tom C.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 9th, 2013, 4:00am
Thanks Tom. If you had charged commission on the little bridges you would be rich now.
I'm a "lone sailor" so I'll have to do my own refuels. I sure don't want the other kind of "old boiler" Pete
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Jul 9th, 2013, 7:26pm
Pete the track work is really looking good.  
 
I am not even going to make any "boiler" comments........
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 22nd, 2013, 2:53am
Ok so not much going on so I'll bring you up to date. (went back to paid work for a couple of weeks, to rest! Now ready to go again)
 
End of ROW, old alignment to the left (now with temporary turntable), new alignment to the right, avoiding the first part of the swamp. Big dead tree had to be dropped first, lots of cleanup later.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 22nd, 2013, 2:58am
Past the point where the excavator sank. The new alignment crosses the old alignment at this point at right angles, and now runs parallel to the drain. Drain now cleaned and extended. Lots of small dead tress had to be cleared.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 22nd, 2013, 3:03am
This leads into better ground conditions, but a jungle of huge dead tree trunks and branches and 20ft high weeds. Very hard to see through, its mostly guesswork at this stage.
Anyhow I had a good breakfast this morning, and set off with newly sharpened chainsaw and jerry of diesel for the orange shovel. This was the view at 8 a.m.
Somewhere in there is a yellow marker!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 22nd, 2013, 3:07am
By lunchtime there was a bit more sun getting through, while the jungle yielded to the assault!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 22nd, 2013, 3:08am
And the fire pile grew
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 22nd, 2013, 3:11am
And here's progress by 4 p.m.  Clear through to the waterfall.  It's now 5 pm and its raining and I'm on my second glass of red.
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Jul 22nd, 2013, 10:05am
Very productive day.  To hot to work on the Sandy Ridge so nothing is getting done!  I like how u end the day.  I usually end with a glass that holds a cold Margarita.  Sometimes I make it 2 also.  
 
Tom C.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 5th, 2013, 11:09pm
Very quiet on the forum. You must be saving it up!
 
Winter's a lovely time of year here but its coming to an end, so it's time to get the creek works done while its all dried up, and before the snakes wake up and go looking for trouble.
Excavator sink hole all tidied up and ready for track prep.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 5th, 2013, 11:16pm
Big dead dropped tree got a haircut and skull-dragged (moved it 400 feet in 5 hours )down to where the creek crossing got blown out last year.  
This is above the waterfall and I want to sort of dam the creek so that gravel will settle and leave clean water to go to the falls, so keeping the waterhole clean.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 5th, 2013, 11:18pm
That's better
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 5th, 2013, 11:31pm
Also, the waterfall is dry so a good time to put in the foundations for the bridge. Here I'm creating a rock "revetment" wall to protect the mass concrete
pier. Reo has been anchored into the bedrock and the overhang is to be backfilled.  No more work on the bridge until the rail reaches here.
It's slow work bucketing everything from above. (wheelbarrow is on track alignment)
Pete
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Aug 6th, 2013, 8:24pm
Pete, That is going to be a beautiful right of way. I hope you will post a video of your maiden lap.
 
As for the forum being quiet... Well down here in Florida it is either too hot or its raining, so this time of year we tend to hide indoors.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 7th, 2013, 7:29pm
Did you see the vid I posted after changing it (to suit US rules). There was some vid taken at the recent meet but its on facebook which I don't subscribe to. Hopefully it will surface soon. Meanwhile you have to put up with photos with no people in them as the crew still numbers 1.  
Video of the finished track could include me being carted off to the funny farm
Indoors is where you build stuff too  Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 19th, 2013, 4:19am
Bobby, I found you a video. Sorry no maidens, just me on a visitors loco
 
Meanwhile all the major earthworks are finished in the next stage. It can rain now!   Lots of dirt dug out of here......
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 19th, 2013, 4:22am
.......and placed here. A small trestle will be inserted at the first yellow cone and a creek dug through, but I'll do that when trackbed compaction has been proved.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 4th, 2013, 3:44am
Strange weather, 2 ten minute showers since June, I can't proceed with tracklaying until the base is damp and compactable.
Did I say the snakes will be awake?. Well they are and there have been lots of sightings including two very nasty eight footers. Time to retreat into the shop and wait till they finish breeding.
Only one big cleanup required to complete this section, but there's big hunks of timber in there so it will take a while. This is part if it.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 4th, 2013, 3:49am
Meanwhile I had a change of plan and deleted the small trestle and instead put a pipe through the embankment. Far more practical, but with cheap materials here, it works out more expensive than the trestle. ....That's life
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 4th, 2013, 4:00am
Moose, you'll be glad to know that the country coach is back on the bench.
I think my window construction is very labour intensive, using aluminum angles to replicate sash windows, but it seems to be working.
The shade of red is no longer available so I'm trying out some roof touch up in "Manor red".  "Heritage red" must have fallen out of fashion.....doh!
 
Pete
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Oct 5th, 2013, 4:21pm
cool, pete!  keep it coming!  hmmm, 8fters...browns perhaps?
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 6th, 2013, 5:34am
Browns and Red Belly Blacks, both worth avoiding.
 
 
Took a few days off for mini convention. Long trip (3000k's) but fascinating.
Cream of Aussie builder were there including a couple of K36 that monstered our little trains.
Here's a link to the official movie  
   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=00XxXL1VI7k
 
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 6th, 2013, 5:46am
Also visited a really nice public railway at Maitland.   See if this works
 
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.413957248706136.1073741837.390003541101507&type=1
 
They welcome visiting locos and have a 4 Km round trip. My train used all its water for one trip. I was way too busy to take pics, but this older vid is really well made.
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PWntVIVl3d8  
 
Pete   
 
Travelling light through the mountains  
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Oct 6th, 2013, 11:06pm
I dislike snakes that bite!  Nice load in the truck!
 
Tom C.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 12th, 2013, 12:07am
A bit of detail on windows in coach.
 
Body is 1/2" ply with 1/16" alum glued on.
 
After hole is routed and the corners filed square, the sashes are milled .
 
12 x 12 strip had to be milled down one edge to 12 x 8. (40 feet of it )
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 12th, 2013, 12:11am
This makes the joint that looks like timber sashes.
 
Note the temporary ply backing board flush with the inside, and perspex sheet temporarily installed to give the correct glass depth.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 12th, 2013, 12:14am
Quick squirt of etch prime, then 1st coat of paint. Repeat 26 times  Sill is 1/4 x 1/4 ally screwed from the inside. Reasonably satisfactory result, but takes ages.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 20th, 2013, 12:55am
Managed to get one side of the coach done.  (however there has been heavy rain so some more track prep is calling )
Pete
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Oct 23rd, 2013, 3:22pm
Hi Pete
 
I like that picture - seeing them on the coach. YEEESSSSSSSSS
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Oct 24th, 2013, 7:20pm
Pete,  
That car is beautiful, nice trick with the aluminum angle for the sashes as well.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 24th, 2013, 11:47pm
Hi Steen, Glad you are still lurking. As I said, I had to raise my standards after seeing that laser work.  Thanks Bobby, I'll try to keep putting time in when I can.
I downloaded "draughtsight x64" CAD in the hope that some of it would sink in, but think that floating the Titanic would be easier.
I mentioned that the steamer could use some extra water storage, and I found this horse wagon which could hide a supplimentary tank.  Apparently it went right behind the loco on cattle trains and had room for for several drovers(cowboys), their horses and their dogs, with storage above the dogs for feed bales.  Neat, eh.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 24th, 2013, 11:51pm
Back out into the forest again. Ready for rail except for a 50yard section.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 24th, 2013, 11:54pm
The run down to Laura
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 24th, 2013, 11:57pm
And the triangle at Laura and the courdouroy track on the right. Tom, what do you think of the "sand castles" now
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 25th, 2013, 12:02am
Didn't notice this until I resized the pics.  Unusual buffer stop at the end of the cordouroy    Not dangerous like the snakes, but then snakes don't dig holes in the middle of the track.
Pete
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Oct 25th, 2013, 9:57am
Well Pete, I forgot about the sand castles. Your progress is lookin good.  I had to do a double take on the last pic also.  I thought it was your dog tilll I read the caption.  Interesting that they dig holes.
 
Tom C.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 11th, 2013, 11:35pm
Look out snakes, I'm back with the chainsaw ., Up at seven before it's too hot, and target 3 trailers of forest junk every day before retreating to the shop.
Here's the result of a week and a half's effort.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 11th, 2013, 11:40pm
First summer storm has put some moisture in the fill, so time to attack my roadbase quarry. This stuff is almost pure bauxite but its only very local and definately not worth building a smelter for!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 11th, 2013, 11:45pm
Just a reminder of one of the problem areas
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 11th, 2013, 11:47pm
And exactly the same view now, the rearranged alignment just hours away from a marathon tracklaying session.
Pete
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Nov 14th, 2013, 7:58pm
Pete, I am very impressed with your track work.  
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Nov 15th, 2013, 8:25am
And that is a nice stacked rock wall in the quarry pic.
 
Tom C.
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Nov 18th, 2013, 3:31pm
I see that the rain water have found a new path.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 22nd, 2013, 9:21pm
Track laying finally, 500 feet of rail brings it down to the embankment.
Summer is here, temp and humidity both around 95!
Another 30 lengths (600 feet)of rail in the shop, ready to lay when cool enough to venture out.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 22nd, 2013, 9:24pm
And specially for Tom, some more little rock walls This one at the concrete pipe.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 22nd, 2013, 9:35pm
Workshop time not wasted, 2 more cow car chassis and horse wagon frame.
I was asked to build a cow car so it was just as easy to make two, maybe I'll sell it too.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 22nd, 2013, 9:39pm
And some underframe jewellry, a dynamo and a westinghouse K air brake in 2" scale. These are the masters to become plastic castings.
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Nov 22nd, 2013, 10:42pm
pete:  wow!  you're staying busy!  like everything you are doing...keep it coming!
 
moose
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Nov 23rd, 2013, 11:51am
Pete, you stack rocks nicely!  Brake cylinder looks cool, can u make me one in 3.75 scale?  Heat & humidity take the fun out of outdoors!
 
Tom C.
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Nov 23rd, 2013, 1:58pm
Pete I concur with Tom, you have serious artistic skills with rocks.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 24th, 2013, 12:50am
Tom, your K brake would be nearly 15" long and 4" in diameter. That's not a cheap item!.  If you only want a couple then turn them in hardwood (that's what my master is) possible borrow the bed posts when nobody is looking!.  
 I seem to remember that you have a foundry on site so one master with draughts and stuff should do the trick. Even with mounting brackets and triple valve it splits conveniently about the vertical axis.  I used the myford lathe but had to vacuum the dust off frequently.
This is the chart I found on the www but I can't find who owns it to credit them.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 24th, 2013, 1:26am
While on the subject of wagons, I found a scrapped log wagon with the correct bogies (trucks) for the old cattle wagon (all previous pics had the wheels in deep shade)  I might try making a pair but they are not like any others I have seen. Thay have a cluster of six coil springs in top and bottom nests and wooden planks. I have taken lots of measurements.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 1st, 2013, 9:26pm
Marathon tracklaying progress. Laid, ballasted and fettled to Mt Crosby.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 1st, 2013, 9:29pm
And today, track reached the station at Laura. Yeeha.   I think I should do now, what they did in old times.......build a saloon
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 1st, 2013, 9:35pm
No, that's not a derail, I lift the flatcar off the trucks and reassign them to other duties. Here I am about to go get some rail, so I'm trying out my new modification to the yellow beast.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 1st, 2013, 9:40pm
I removed the toolbox (which also stopped kids riding on the back) and added a lifting handle.  A bit of clearance added and voila, 180* direction change!.  Also a 3 foot rooster bar stores nicely inside the spine.
My neck was getting sore trying to pump in reverse.
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Dec 1st, 2013, 11:33pm
Pete, makin nice progress.  I like the saloon idea.  Tip one for us.
 
Tom C.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 5th, 2013, 6:11pm
And one more pic, of a rail delivery. The big little bridge in the foreground has temporary side support for the ballast loads.
Planning to have the turning triangle operational by New Year's Eve for an unmeet (3 steamers and a GP38 have expressed interest)
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 22nd, 2013, 1:50am
It's been hot and hard, but we're there with everything ready except the station platform.
Here's the entry to the station and turning triangle, the other side of the picture above
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 22nd, 2013, 1:54am
End of the line. The 1:1 ties should stop anything going over the waterfall.
I did bring the steamer down for the first run, but things didn't work out too good.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 22nd, 2013, 1:59am
I had been packing to finish the track because I needed to address a loose driving wheel (think it got hot  as the axle goes right through the ashpan) that I found when the keyway fell out
I saw a post on Home engineer about scotch keying drivers with threaded screws. I put two 5mm screws in each, and made the holes 20mm deep and blind, so the screws would bottom heavily, helped by Loctite hi temp retainer.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 22nd, 2013, 2:04am
I couldn't work out how to hoist the loco so I laid it on it's side. Not a goodway to treat a loco, but with lots of packing and a rubber mat, it proved to be easy and safe, and didn't have any damage other than a bent step.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 22nd, 2013, 2:14am
That should have been the end of hard work, but as it pulled in to Laura station, the firebox syphon tube (yes, the one I replaced last year with 3000 psi hydraulic pipe) split. Before I could kill the fire (I had been building it for the return trip) the plug blew, killing the injectors.  All I could do was stuff a rag in the stack and turn on the blower.
Right now I don't know what the next move is, but it's knocked every ounce of enthusiasm clean out.  
Santa, I've been real good, can I have a new boiler please
Pete
 
Merry Christmas all
Posted by: Henry Posted on: Dec 22nd, 2013, 12:00pm
Sorry for the bad luck Pete! Keep on keepin' on!
 
Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays
 
Henry
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Dec 22nd, 2013, 1:18pm
Sorry to hear of the failure Pete!  Do you really need it to go thru the firebox?  
 
Tom C.
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Dec 22nd, 2013, 9:29pm
Pete,
 
I am sorry to here of the siphon tube failure. I know personally the aggravation and frustration of a locomotive with issues. At the last unmeet my lubricator failed which resulted in seizing up the valve bobbins. I have been working on repairs ever since.  
 
Don't give up. Just keep thinking of the fun you'll have steaming around your gorgeous track!
 
Merry Christmas and a Happy and Prosperous New Year!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 24th, 2013, 2:45am
Thanks for your words of encouragement.  Maybe I won't push it off a cliff.  I have checked the code and syphons are now optional.  I'm going to get rid of mine.
Incidentally, the man who helped install the tube had his boiler here today to get new fireclay (apparently I'm the clay expert!) His boiler syphon is in perfect condition and it was the offcut from his pipe that went into my loco.  How weird is that
 I also realised that the tube went the first time on the opening lap of the previous section of track.  Next time I open a section of track, I'll get someone elses loco
 
Pete
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Dec 24th, 2013, 5:05am
Hi Pete
 
Maybe the tube should above tie fire insted of in the fire - it looks like it has burned a way.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 24th, 2013, 4:46pm
Glædelig jul og godt nytår Steen. Perhaps I should explain "Briggs" boiler as it seems to be an Aussie oddity.  
 http://www.narrowgauge.iform.com.au/boiler.html
There are no side or back water walls, or need for stays,  so construction is very simple, safe and strong.   However it isn't as efficient as a locomotive" type so the syphon or circulator tube runs from the blowdown fiiting(in front of the firebox) through the fire to the crownsheet.
It works very well and all but eliminates "dead" spots in the water, but is at the mercy of fire corrosion, physical damage, and blockage with scale.
Because it also can cause excessive turbulance, the code has been  recently changed to make it the builder's choice whether it is desirable or not.
Steel locomotive boilers are rare here, and expensive, however the "New Rich" can now have a loco boiler in "stainless" (2205 steel) which is light, very strong, requires no boiler tretment, but costs double a carbon steel one.
You pays your money and takes your choice!
Pete
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Dec 27th, 2013, 6:50am
Hi Pete
 
Merry Christmas & Happy newyear.
 
Thanks for sharing - it helps understanding.
 
How much will you loose if you remove the boiler syphon.  
Would it bee possible feed it in at the level of the lower tubes?
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Dec 27th, 2013, 7:14pm
Pete,
 
What if you "sleeved" the carbon steel siphon with a stainless steel pipe? The stainless steel would hold up to the fire better.  
 
Bobby
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 28th, 2013, 10:25pm
Bobby, All repairs have to be certified here, and my ability to weld tubes is zero . Removing and plugging doesn't require cert).
Steen, I immediately said NO to the pipe being higher, but on closer inspection, the centre bottom tube is left out for the front drain plug, so in theory it IS possibe to put the pipe higher, like some of the 1:1 locos that had hollow brick arch supports. However it would need to be done at construction time.
Yesterday I had an "unmeet" for family, friends and neighbours, with three deisels. It was highly satisfactory and raised the eyebrows of some who had seen me disappearing into the forest but not realised what I was doing. Hi-tech son has videos, hopefully he'll get bored enough to edit and youtube them.
Today it is way too hot to be outside (37/98 air temp) so I am boiler pulling.
Pete
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Dec 30th, 2013, 6:37am
Hi Pete
 
As you wrote " the centre bottom tube is left out for the front drain plug ". That was what I saw on the page you linked to.
If you insert the tube at that location you may also make some flow along the tubes towards the cold end of the boiler getting better circulation.  
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 31st, 2013, 1:02am
Thanks Steen, but I'm taking the easy option. Here's the problem, pipe perfect at the ends but paper thin in the middle.  NO MORE  It's gone, removed, blanked off, firebox welded over, blowdown relocated. Waiting on fireclay to set then test and reinstal. Might even make the weekend meet.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jan 23rd, 2014, 3:30am
Update. Boiler back in, with no siphon. I rearranged the fireclay to reduce dead spots, and replaced the "rocket science" lagging with fibreglass mat as it had disintegrated prematurely.
For testing I knocked the safeties down to 80 and lit up a wood fire. To my surprise it steamed like crazy. As I have a lot of untreated sleeper material I ran for the unmeet on wood only. It makes no smoke or clinker and doesn't easily produce holes. The firebed only needs to be about an inch thick but you have to add a log every lamppost! Vid of the unmeet posted.  Pete
Posted by: Boulder Creek Posted on: Feb 18th, 2014, 6:47pm
Track work is progressing really well mate!
I've got to get up there for a visit someday!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 2nd, 2014, 11:12pm
Dave, bring that Cane loco with you! Sounds real business like.
Going stir crazy in shop, had to get out. Fired up the orange shovel and went looking for some new territory.
This is Mt Crosby weir, above the waterfall. The original access track disappears off to the left, past the planned Chillagoe station, to the firebreak on the far side of the property (now called "middle earth"). The new track is the haul road for track construction on the far side of the waterfall. It goes all the way to the far corner of the block, now known as "the end of the world".
Just out of view on the right track, is the rough alignment of the rail off the future bridge.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 2nd, 2014, 11:20pm
And here's today's play area. A veritable forest of Lantana which will need to be cleared so that the bridge alignment can be worked out. Following that there will need to be more drains dug as this spot also becomes swamp after long periods of rain.  Three loads and I have to wring out my shirt....humidity is still around 90%
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 5th, 2014, 2:37am
Had to go into town and on the off-chance called into my favourite timber yard.
Sadly they are closing down in the next few days, but they still had a few packs of decking.  Anyhow, a deal was struck and this lot of new boards, exactly the right size for sleepers, now decorates my driveway.  A bit of mental math and there's close on 5000 ties in there, at less than 20cents each, easily enough to finish the railroad.  Looks like the lathe upgrade is on hold for a while
Pete
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Mar 5th, 2014, 9:58am
Nice dickering there Pete.  measure twice cut once!  don't waste any!
 
Tom C.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 14th, 2014, 12:24am
Daily workout.....for the dropsaw that is. (no measures, Tom, just hit the stop and pull down.)  Brain in gear but body in nuetral
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 14th, 2014, 12:28am
Then out to waterfall country to relocate some bush.  Here's the view from head of steel.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 14th, 2014, 12:32am
And looking back from the other side. The top of the trailer is about the track future level. Probably will be big bridge, curving trestle, smaller bridge, embankment. Plus some fairly serious drainage ditches.
Pete
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Mar 15th, 2014, 7:23pm
Pete,
 
I love the updates. That is some really scenic areas you are putting track through. How many guys on your crew? I never see anyone else in the photos.  
 
How many acres are you building on?  And how many feet of track do you figure you will have when finished. (I know, we never really finish do we?)
 
Bobby
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 16th, 2014, 3:39am
Bobby, The crew numbers one.....me, and that includes the photographer .  All my methods and systems are worked on one man op and it seems to work fine.I do have work parties from time to time, mainly when there's bush clearing to be done as it makes lots of noise to keep the wildlife at bay. A workday is planned for next Tuesday.  
The block of land is 10 acres, mostly of previously logged gum trees (some stumps are over 6 feet across) and is in very degraded condition. My work includes regenerating the land and replanting with more appropriate species (as I am a bit of a greenie)
I only have a rough idea where the track is going as most forest is not "see through" but I make sure that no part of the line is visible from other parts otherwise it looks like Disneyland.
 
Solid red = done.
Dotted red = planned
Yellow = pathways  
Looking at the mudmap it would seem that I am about halfway, but when the stock of rail and ties runs out, there will be no more. I guess around a mile of mainline. Ask me again when I get to that point!
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Mar 16th, 2014, 8:45am
Hi  
 
Found you on Google Earth, it is from 16 nov 2011 ...... Hope the satellite will pass you soon.  so that we can get a better picture.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 21st, 2014, 3:55am
Wow, Steen. The satellite must have been lost!
 
New vid posted. No fancy editing, or music or chat!
 
Tie stack still growing
 
 
Pete
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Mar 25th, 2014, 4:14pm
"New vid posted" Where?
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 25th, 2014, 11:33pm
Here.... http://forums.railfan.net/forums.cgi?board=LiveSteam;action=display;num=1168300963;start=100    
 
 
Hey, would you like to use your amazing skills to help me RP a headlight for my loco?
 
Pete
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Mar 26th, 2014, 10:34am
Pete, nice video.  I enjoyed the trip over the rails.  Just the right amount of sound for me.  Tks.
 
Tom C.
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Mar 27th, 2014, 4:58pm
Looks interesting....  
 
What are the measures/Size?
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Mar 28th, 2014, 4:23pm
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/64541328/headlight.EASM
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 29th, 2014, 7:06am
That's a pretty awesome start.  Way too fast for me, you must not need sleep  .    I'll keep plugging away at the drawings but it will take several days (I keep having to dip the feather into the inkpot!!!!)    
 
Meanwhile here's another version. Take a look at those workers, they obviously haven't had a payrise lately!
Pete
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Mar 31st, 2014, 10:42am
Yes hey are a motley crew!
 
Tom C.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 4th, 2014, 3:57am
Got all the ties cut before the first real rain of the year and the stain goes everywhere.     4000+ (lost count) which means 16000+ holes to drill, good job I'm going to live to 100!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 4th, 2014, 3:59am
Rain means shop time, so the country coach finally got it's paint job. Only the interior, trucks and roof to go
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Apr 13th, 2014, 2:41pm
2nd revision....
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 20th, 2014, 3:21am
More workshop time. Cow car No3 in "experimental weathered" grey, by request. Hope the new owner likes it.  
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 20th, 2014, 3:26am
Some new facilities for visitors. Some regrading to make tent pitching easier, and a camp fire circle.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 20th, 2014, 3:29am
And more progress on track extensions. This is "end of the world" (furthest point from the house) to become railmotor stop Belmont.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 20th, 2014, 3:32am
A big radius 270* curve into the hill could need up to 5 foot cutting at this point if I don't hit rock first.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 20th, 2014, 3:39am
End of next stage. Passing point and temporary turntable to go in.
This is my favourite place in the forest, the grassy glade and stand of grass trees just scream for a picnic shelter and barbeque. Station sign "Chillagoe" is bit ahead of time!
Pete
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Apr 20th, 2014, 6:56am
Hi Pete
 
Great progress
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 26th, 2014, 3:55am
April unmeet, and the biggest turnup to date. Only a couple of locos but many people just came for a look, most will return with engines next time.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 26th, 2014, 4:00am
Significant was this Queensland 1200 class diesel, which made light work of hauling my cattle train full of passengers.  Never had a full train here before
 
Peter
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 9th, 2014, 3:48am
Having made a track through the scrub, the next job was to do a proper survey of the final roadbed.
My guessing is usually pretty good, but this time I was way out. Coming off the bridge ( bridge marked with yellow string tied to black steel pole), the track curves to the right between two enormous trees and a monster stump. The centre of the curve is in mid air somewhere downstream of the waterfall so radius measures don't work. Elongated tangents also don't allow for multi obstacles so had to resort to thinking (doh!)
Answer was to lay out 60 foot radius on the back lawn (purple line on pic), then join two places on that line with a baseline(red in the pic) Then record offsets at 2 metre intervals(green on pic)
The red line goes through the tree gap, but by continuing the base further, the purple line can be taken up to another 20 feet (any more loses accuracy) to give the lead into the next bit.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 9th, 2014, 3:58am
Compare this pic to reply 341 and you see my mistake. The track had to move over nearly 20 feet and this threw out the alignment for the next curve transition.(old align in red) So today's job was to redo over 100 feet of guesswork and turn it into smooooooth curves!
Now I better get out the laser and work out the gradients. BTW This spot is the only level place on the entire railroad, so far, and it doesn't last for long
Pete
Posted by: tomc Posted on: May 9th, 2014, 10:50am
OOPPPS!  Not good when thinking fails!.  Better now than when rails and ties down and it doesn't look or feel good when used!
 
Tom C.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 10th, 2014, 3:55am
You didn't have to agree Tom
This is the next curve. The tractor and the orange shovel are on the new alignment and I'll probably rework the old alignment as a drain, hopefully I won't have to resort to cordouroy again.  At the end of this the long climb back up the hill begins with 2 feet out of ground followed by 4 feet into ground.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 20th, 2014, 3:27am
Started putting together materials for the big bridge. It's too far to walk and there's no vehicle access, so it's time to use the railroad as a railroad. Good fun!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 20th, 2014, 3:36am
The loop at "end of the world" getting filled. This is three days worth.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 20th, 2014, 3:37am
And this is the cut supplying all that dirt.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 20th, 2014, 3:42am
I know I need a break, but not this kind. The pivot bearing on the orange shovel has completely failed. This is a serious halt to progress  
Time to check the forums and youtube to work out how to fix it. \Pete
Posted by: tomc Posted on: May 20th, 2014, 9:52am
Oh Boy,  not good.  Good luck with your search & repair.
 
Tom C.
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: May 20th, 2014, 9:45pm
Crap, that is a major "ouch".  Look at the bright side, you get to practice up on your welding and fabrication skills.  
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 21st, 2014, 1:15am
Tractor forums to the rescue.... clean it up, V out the join, tack the corners, belt the bent bit back into shape, weld it up and add a strap or two.  Simple
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 21st, 2014, 1:18am
Crank the welder up to 120 amps and see how good my welding is.
All that practice building railroad cars is starting to pay off. This could be a goer.
Pete
Posted by: tomc Posted on: May 21st, 2014, 12:24pm
Lookin good Pete.  Can't keep a good backyard mechanic down to long!  Let us know how it works when back on.
 
Tom C.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 27th, 2014, 11:53pm
Back in operation!  Welding seems to be good so it's back to track prep. The material in the cutting is very dry and doesn't compact well so I will wait for some rain before resuming.
Meanwhile the promise of some steel beam has been withdrawn so the bridge is on hold while I save up (or collect on the sold cow car)
It has been decided to extend the new track to the next triangle at Canungra and use the bridge materials there instead. This adds about 1000 feet to the railroad and nearly doubles the run length and adds four stations.  Any further development will depend on my enthusiasm and depth of pocket. (currently the pocket is zippered shut!!)
 
pete
 
Chillagoe track alignment, all on grade.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 28th, 2014, 12:09am
The start of the triangle at Canungra. This is on top of the cliff overlooking the creek with some great views when the trees have had a haircut. Headshunts will be at least 30 feet so that entire trains can turn
Posted by: tomc Posted on: May 29th, 2014, 8:31am
on May 28th, 2014, 12:09am, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Headshunts will be at least 30 feet so that entire trains can turn

 
OK, translate to American English please.
 
Tom C.
Posted by: YeOldeEnjine Posted on: May 29th, 2014, 3:19pm
on May 29th, 2014, 8:31am, tomc wrote:       (Click here for original message)

 
OK, translate to American English please.
 
Tom C.

 
 
Typically an Escape Track / stub end ahead of a switch to allow an engine room to run around it's train.  
 
I think here our friend is talking about the tail tracks to a wye........ but I could be wrong.
 
Tim W.
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: May 29th, 2014, 9:07pm
Exactly what I would have said: A headshunt is the tail of the wye, and a triangle is a wye.
I love these linguistic differences. When I was travelling to Japan (sadly I didn't make it to OZ) a local, who worked for the same multinational company, told about an international sales meeting in Japan. He (whose native language was Japanese) had to translate English between the Yanks and the Aussies, who couldn't understand each other!  For that matter, there is a guy at my work from South Carolina that I can't understand. Nobody else does either, unless he slows way down or we have an interpreter.
 
Fred,
Let me say how much I enjoy following your posts about the track you are building.  Many daunting obstacles to be overcome, but the results are very impressive!
Posted by: George_Harris Posted on: May 30th, 2014, 1:36am
on May 29th, 2014, 9:07pm, Dan Watson wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Exactly what I would have said: A headshunt is the tail of the wye, and a triangle is a wye.
I love these linguistic differences.

 
I have a book that is a Chinese dictionary of engineering term that I got my first year in Taiwan.  The handy thing for me was that it has each term given in Chinese, Japanese, German, French, American English and British English.  Other than using it to say, I mean this one to local people, my main use was at the time I got it working between those last 2 since we followed a British company on the project and once you get below the rail everything has a different name.  The definitions were in Chinese.  There were also some sketches.  I was going to get some copies for new arrivals but found that it was out of print.
 
Most of us here probably know the basics but far from all.
 
rail=rail
rail web=fishing surface or fishing
rail base=rail foot
joint bar=fishplate
track bolt / joint bolt=fishbolt
tie=sleeper
tieplate=baseplate
spike=dogspike
ballast=ballast
subballast-sand blanket
space between tracks in a multiple track lines = six foot
space between rails is gage side of rail = four foot
 
Then of course the one at hand:
wye=triangle
 
Spring switches are uncommon outside the US & Canada
Spring frogs are so far as I know unknown outside the US & Canada
 
there are more but this is a good start
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 30th, 2014, 4:51am
Geez Tom, see the trouble you cause when you don't pay attention in your English lessons
I looked up headshunt in the google, and one of the definitions was " a tube placed into the brain cavity to increase blood flow"
 
A wye is a set of points that diverge at equal angles.
A road is the choice you make about which track to take.
A stub is the bit you throw out of the window when you've smoked the rest
Tail tracks is what kangaroos leave behind in the dirt.
You turn trains around on an "angle"
 
 
 
Now, what was the question!
Pete
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Jun 4th, 2014, 5:36am
Hi Pete
 
What dose the colors mean?
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 5th, 2014, 3:00am
Solid red is existing, dotted red is in progress and the green dots are the future balloon loop which may or may not get built (some checks with the lazer level show huge change in height in that area.) Yellow is haul road, to later become walk paths.  
Meanwhile the excavator is back hard at work digging the cutting following a little rain (almost deep enough for a tunnel, but I don't like tunnels, too many bugs!)
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 6th, 2014, 2:01am
The cow car is sold and paid for, so I can backtrack and finalise the waterfall  bridge. This is my inspiration, but I want to use trusses on top, as was common in the outback., A thin pipe handrail will sit on top, as a safety barrier.
These panels scale at 15 feet by 2 feet but the creek is 15 feet minimum and 20 feet to be safe.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 6th, 2014, 2:11am
Discovered that I can get "I" beams in 20 foot and 30 foot lengths.  If I make the bridge in 2 panels of 15 feet then I can use smaller steel sections. However the track is curved after the first 20 feet.
Solution is to mock up a panel layout on the existing trestle to see if a curve is possible without taking out the legs of train travellers.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 6th, 2014, 2:20am
That seems to be OK, so paint a panel on to a photo of the trestle and see if it looks OK.  That does it, 2 15 foot panels it is, and a lot more care needed with the footings as they will be right at the water's edge. What do you reckon?
  Doubled 6" I beams, 1 1/2" double angle frame, 1" x 1/8th for the lattice.  1 1/2" x 5"  deck boards with a little gap
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Jun 19th, 2014, 6:19pm
...progress, pete, progress!  one day i have to get down there for a visit...splendid work!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 24th, 2014, 2:35am
Remind myself that it's 3 years since the first rail went down, I'd better start getting serious soon.
There's steel in the shop and neighbour Ron came round and gave a hand. I spent a bit of time giving some welding lessons, it's surprising how your own work improves when you are showing someone else how to do it.
 Now there's 2 lattice bridge panels done, and 2 to go.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 24th, 2014, 2:44am
Out in the bush, the approach for the bridge is taking shape. There's 35 feet of trestle to get down off the bridge.
There you go, Bobby T, two pictures with people in them
Pete
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Jun 24th, 2014, 7:23pm
Nice pictures. Having friends help is a lot more fun.  
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 2nd, 2014, 2:33am
Bridge construction advancing. 2 out of the 4 trusses done and beam brackets on plus a coat of "structural silver" paint
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 2nd, 2014, 2:36am
No vehicle access to the waterfall, so the disconnects are getting seriously tested. Passed with flying colors. I wonder if the beams will go as easy.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 2nd, 2014, 2:42am
Finally got the foundations poured, but it took 22 barrow loads. Poured concrete piers have had to be ruled out. Instead I found a bridge with timber bents (and its very near home, by chance.)  Timber wins!
Interestingly, this bridge was built without the centre support, but had to be strengthened later as axle loadings increased.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 2nd, 2014, 2:50am
Can't dig timber in, so it's constructed on a full size tie. Easier to build lying down, but it'll weigh 1/4 ton and won't fit down the line, so might have to talk nicely to the orange shovel.
Here's one side done, but I cut 2 of everything so I can turn it over for the second row to be bolted
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 3rd, 2014, 2:16am
Disconnects took the steel beam easily. What would I do without orange shovel/ crane and some slings
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 3rd, 2014, 2:20am
Long slow trip with the bent, weaving between trees and dragging it through the creek. Here I stop to re-hitch ready to lift into place.
Sorry, Bobby, no people pictures, it's back to one-man-op.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 3rd, 2014, 2:23am
Borrowed the steaming bay track and the long unloader ramp. Now lets see if this will work.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 3rd, 2014, 2:26am
There you go, its amazing what you can do with a bit of left-field brainpower.
Now I just have to do it all again with the second span
Pete
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Jul 4th, 2014, 8:24am
I LOVE IT
 
Pete - What do you put between the wood and the ground?
 
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Jul 4th, 2014, 2:45pm
Nice start.  Must be rough with no help!  U improvise well.
 
I see u have joined Facebook.  
 
Tom C.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 5th, 2014, 2:43am
Got some help today for final lift and weld. (Steve has a 8kva genset and mig welder, made light work)
This is the main beams in, with just enough track to get the welder in place. Outer trusses will come later when I have had a long "nanna nap"
Facebook.....really? tell me more
Steen, it's all ground contact H4 timber, however I add copper napthate jelly to the bottom face prior to bolting to the concrete
Pete
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Jul 5th, 2014, 10:04am
OOOPPS my bad on Facebook.  It was the Boulder Creek.  No coffee yesterday morning!
 
Tom C.
 
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 23rd, 2014, 1:57am
Bridge progress
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Aug 5th, 2014, 3:16pm
on Jul 23rd, 2014, 1:57am, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Bridge progress

 
 
pete!  nice work, can't wait to see it...maybe in about 7 years at the soonest, but you are on the itenerary!
 
moose
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 6th, 2014, 3:47am
It might be finished by then
Today's progress, with visitor's train posed on top. Pete
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Aug 6th, 2014, 7:40am
Pete, NICE!  quite the undertaking
 
Tom C.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 14th, 2014, 8:53pm
I've been pushing to get the deck on as there's rain forecast, but now it's done and painted. I have drilled for the rail screws but I'll leave that for later as there is a more immediate problem with drainage immediately off the bridge. (and I've spent more time on my knees lately  than a drunk in a toilet cubicle)
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 14th, 2014, 9:03pm
A little "no it's not like Tom's" bridge takes the surface runoff, but there's a line of soakage right under the big tree.
A hard clay layer brings the water to the top, and the only room for a drain is in the middle of the track. Oh well, here goes another experiment!
I got this far and then the heavens opened, so it's quickly scratch through the trench and then on with the tarp and head for dry land.  
Won't complain about rain as it is desperately needed after the coldest, driest, windiest winter on record.
Pete
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Aug 15th, 2014, 7:40pm
WOW! Pete you are really taming that wilderness. The trestle and bridge is looking very impressive. Very nice work! Your orange shovel has definitely been earning its keep on this project!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 23rd, 2014, 2:46am
Just made it with track prep between the showers, it's now raining again (that's the second time this year )  This is after the bridge, looking back.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 23rd, 2014, 2:55am
And this is looking back along the embankment at "Belmont" (end of the world). This bit even got landscaped and is ready for rail. I sure glad to see the end of carting about 70 tons of fill over the last 4 months.
Rain means workshop time, so the plastic casting factory is now in session
Pete
Posted by: Boulder Creek Posted on: Aug 31st, 2014, 7:16pm
Wow, you are making great progress Pete!
Tough break on the shovel but glad to see you got it fixed again!
I like the idea of the drain under the centre of the track. That's a good solution when you can't put it anywhere else.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 3rd, 2014, 3:43am
Good to see you're still lurking. You must have been busy as there seems to be a lack of news from the Apple Isle. Have you done the last loop yet?
I might have to build some new cars as my passenger demographic has changed a bit
pete
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Sep 20th, 2014, 10:20pm
on Sep 3rd, 2014, 3:43am, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Good to see you're still lurking. You must have been busy as there seems to be a lack of news from the Apple Isle. Have you done the last loop yet?
I might have to build some new cars as my passenger demographic has changed a bit
pete

 
hi pete!  glad to see progress and even proud to see the demographic change...gonna keep you busy!
 
 
moose
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 22nd, 2014, 11:50pm
Moose, only 6 years and ten months to go, eh
Been doing some surveying at Canungra, the new terminus. Along the way a big dead tree had to go, along with another that was leaning on it. Very dangerous scenario, but it's now in a "better place"  (I recycled it into a retaining structure)
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2014, 12:07am
And this is the final approach to the station. You guessed it, another bridge, over a pretty little gully (I still have enough decking for about 30 feet of bridge, so I figure that the bridge will be 30 feet max )
There's about 2 feet plus to scalp off the hill and make room for passing loop and a siding with turntable.  The triangle (wye) has been put on hold as I've got too much prep on the go as it is.
The new quarry hasn't produced good material so I'm back to carting from the original pit, nearly 30 minute round trip to this point.  This also means that the station has to be done first as there's no access once the track is laid.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2014, 12:27am
The big bridge is now complete. I was expecting to have a pipe handrail over the trusses, but it seems to work fine without, possibly because the deck is 4 feet wide and boarded. The trusses are a 27 inches high and feel quite safe without the handrail.
In the background is the first load of track ties for the nearly 500 feet of finished prep.
Pete
Posted by: JWB46 Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2014, 5:44am
G,day Pete, this is a real treat seeing what you accomplished there. Contratulations.
It has been a number of years since I last caught up with you, life has thrown a few wobblies my way and kind of took me away from the hobby. At present we are having a comeback, but from a slightly different angle. Instead of building a model loco, I am constructing a minimal loco   Still in 7.25inch.
Have a good one....John Baxter.
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Sep 24th, 2014, 6:41pm
on Sep 23rd, 2014, 5:44am, JWB46 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
G,day Pete, this is a real treat seeing what you accomplished there. Contratulations.
It has been a number of years since I last caught up with you, life has thrown a few wobblies my way and kind of took me away from the hobby. At present we are having a comeback, but from a slightly different angle. Instead of building a model loco, I am constructing a minimal loco   Still in 7.25inch.
Have a good one....John Baxter.

 
 
john, great to have you back!  believe me, i know how life gets in the way of the important things...live steaming! lol!  since you are starting a minimalist loco, why know start a thread here on the live steam board?  would make a great project to follow.
 
moose
Posted by: JWB46 Posted on: Sep 24th, 2014, 11:23pm
Thanks Moose, without impinging too much on Pete's thread the basics for this loco has appeared on here. Back then it started as a battery/electric railbus ( check your #5 thread).Now it is petrol/electric, no batteries and now it is sit on. Will start new thread later.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 26th, 2014, 6:32pm
John. Long time no hear.  Minimalist locos welcome. Keep in touch.
Sometimes you just have to put the project away until there's a better way, I'm having that problem with some vintage bogie trucks that won't play ball, but I come back from time to time to try again. Pete
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Sep 30th, 2014, 2:12pm
I just ran in to this: https://www.shapeways.com/
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 7th, 2014, 7:40pm
Interesting concept, but very hard to work out the best way to use them
 I think the technology is yet to come down to a price that is reasonable.
Maybe Moose has more info as he was talking about using them.
I've decided to go with lumps of metal from the junk box
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 30th, 2014, 3:52am
A couple of tracklaying shots. Coming up through the cutting
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 30th, 2014, 4:00am
And approaching Chillagoe Station, 600 feet on from the big bridge.  Calls for passing loop, with the switch, a "road" crossing and drainage creek bridge all in quick succession.
Meanwhile we're having a heatwave, so I've retreated  into the workshop for some metal mangling practice!
Pete
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Oct 30th, 2014, 7:49pm
on Sep 26th, 2014, 6:32pm, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
John. Long time no hear.  Minimalist locos welcome. Keep in touch.
Sometimes you just have to put the project away until there's a better way, I'm having that problem with some vintage bogie trucks that won't play ball, but I come back from time to time to try again. Pete

 
Pete, I am looking at the photo you posted of the "bogie trucks" and I think I see what may be causing you problems.  
 
I notice that all of your spring action comes from the bolster only and there does not appear to be any independent journal movement.
 
The bettendorf truck next to it also uses bolster springs but it also has side frame movement. Which allows each wheel to better follow the track undulations. I noticed that your trucks have a front and rear cross bar which may be making the whole assembly too rigid.  
 
Of course my friend I am making these assumptions from a photograph halfway around the world.  
 
Bobby
 
PS, the track work is looking outstanding as usual.
 
 
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 31st, 2014, 3:29am
Ah, the trucks.......    Took me ages to work out how they worked, then even longer on how to model them!
Here's a pic of one in a local museum (found AFTER getting mine done. Doh.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 31st, 2014, 3:38am
They are like an arch bar style, but with a swing plank bolster. Sort of like passenger cars of the day, but without sprung axleboxes.
The articulation works like a Bettendorf, and the end bars, which carry the brakes, have enough flexibility to conform to track irregularities.
The problem I had was in using steel bars that didn't have enough give to act like the 1-1.
Cure was simple..... use thinner bar and leave the corner bolts slack. I have the luxury of nylok bolts on my side!!!
Here's the finished job, now my cattle car has the correct trucks, yee har.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Oct 31st, 2014, 3:46am
And just to show that they work  Heading into the cutting on the new extension  
Pete
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Nov 1st, 2014, 5:57am
Hi pete
 
Good progress
 
Can we have more pictures of your trucks?
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 2nd, 2014, 1:30am
Early pic of working out suitable materials to achieve correct appearance with enough strength for a riding car. (The cute wheels are diecast alloy, not quite up to passenger service but will be OK for future horse car.)
Instead I used spoked wheels from one of the Bettendorfs, replacing them with solid wheels cut from stock 4140 bar
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 2nd, 2014, 1:43am
Here's the shop drawings. As usual, they were often changed to suit materials available, so I'm only continuing the practice!
Back in reply 428, the 2nd bolster assembly is on the left, with temporary bolt in the centre, to hold the spring nests until side links installed.
Also shown are the axleboxes. I would have liked to use 40 x 40 (1 1/2' sq) solid, but could not find any, so had to make do with 40 x 40 tube with solid bar inside, to carry the double skateboard bearings.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 2nd, 2014, 1:52am
This pic might answer Bobby's query about ability of side bars to rotate to track undulation. The vertical links have slots in the bottom for this, though why they are so long is not clear, I slotted the bolster plank (top pivots) giving enough flexibility for about 5mm lift on any one wheel.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 2nd, 2014, 1:58am
Then finally epoxied in some dummy axleboxes  made from plastic. I milled some stock castings, hence the snowstorm on the mill table.
Pete
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Nov 4th, 2014, 7:37pm
Peter,
 
Those trucks came out nice. I must have misunderstood the earlier post as I thought you were still sorting out some issues. It is a very interesting design.
 
Now, how much 1 1/2" square cold-rolled solid bar did you need? LOL
 
Bobby
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 5th, 2014, 4:02am
I was! but my brain was hurting, so I put them aside and did other projects that didn't hurt as much. John's post got me thinking again, so out they came again
Meanwhile the country coach is all but finished, in time for a exhibition on Sunday,   (No4 cow car got some attention too, and the Andrews trucks for a future project, arrived from ebay US)
BTW Love your new build, keep it coming. Pete
Posted by: Pennsy4483 Posted on: Nov 5th, 2014, 7:53am
Those two look awfully pretty together on the stand!  Keep up the great work!
 
Don
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Nov 6th, 2014, 4:22pm
on Nov 5th, 2014, 7:53am, Pennsy4483 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Those two look awfully pretty together on the stand!  Keep up the great work!
 
Don

 
Don:  I couldn't agree more...awesome combination!  Love 10 wheelers, cabooses and passenger cars in one train.
 
moose
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 9th, 2014, 10:19pm
Show time for the cattle train. 4 cow cars for the first time (last one part finished to show construction methods).   Big pull for a ten wheeler on those grades but it came through without missing a beat, or running out of steam or fire or traction  (touch and go on the traction part!)
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 9th, 2014, 10:27pm
And another
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Nov 9th, 2014, 10:34pm
Nice Pete.  Always nice when a project is completed.
 
Tom C.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 20th, 2014, 1:26am
Didn't make it to the photo board, but here's some that did.
http://www.tracksandtrains.com/qsmee/gallery/2014nov/index.html
 
Meanwhile, No 4 cow car is all prettied up, now I have to find somewhere to put it. I feel a workshop reorganise coming up
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 20th, 2014, 1:37am
And on to the next project, the drovers car. ( for 3 cowboys, their horses and dogs)  Also used to transport valuable cows to shows around the state.  This is my first 4 wheel wagon, and a whole new set of skills to learn.
 
I'm using some recently released diecast wheels which are real pretty, but not suitable for ride-on or for working brakes.
 
A gift out of the blue, of enough W irons, cast iron axleboxes, wheels and couplings for 5 wagons, from a respected engineer who changed his mind.
Outstanding generosity, and very humbling.  Some of the bits on the little table.
Pete
 
 
btw  Welcome back Pockets......now build something
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Nov 24th, 2014, 3:45pm
on Nov 20th, 2014, 1:37am, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
And on to the next project, the drovers car. ( for 3 cowboys, their horses and dogs)  Also used to transport valuable cows to shows around the state.  This is my first 4 wheel wagon, and a whole new set of skills to learn.
 
I'm using some recently released diecast wheels which are real pretty, but not suitable for ride-on or for working brakes.
 
A gift out of the blue, of enough W irons, cast iron axleboxes, wheels and couplings for 5 wagons, from a respected engineer who changed his mind.
Outstanding generosity, and very humbling.  Some of the bits on the little table.
Pete
 
 
btw  Welcome back Pockets......now build something

 
 
pete:  the wheels look wonderful!  ...just wish they were load bearing, got a couple of mow gandy flats that could use them.  might have to see if some could be water-jetted from cast steel...hmmmm?!
 
 
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 25th, 2014, 2:08am
Moose, the wheels come from here and they are quite cheap
http://www.dncsystems.dynalias.com/minirail/
They are very strong, quite OK for non-riding cars, it's just that the alloy will wear if heavily loaded (i.e. grandma and the ankle biters) and will gall with most brake shoes.   Soooooo...On the gandy would be dandy
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 4th, 2014, 2:09am
Underframe as far as my research allows. (How do those steps mount ) So on to some bodywork. Plywood floor and ends, but sides and cladding to be aluminium. Here's my excuse of a drawing, and the first ally panel marked ready to be cut out for windows/louvres.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 4th, 2014, 2:19am
And the first mock up. Strong shelves for battery and compressor with space in the middle for water tank. Ally will have detail fixed on, but sheet should make it strong
Moose. I need cosmetic brakes so I thought I'd make the shoes from wood. Then I figured they could maybe  work as hardwood wouldn't gall (maybe)
 
Pete
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Dec 4th, 2014, 9:07am
Pete, we used oak shoes on our cars and they worked fine.
 
Tom C.
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Dec 5th, 2014, 7:51pm
Pete, thanks for the welcome. Trying to get the shop in some sort of order and then it's back to work (play?) on Moosey's Model T.
 
Your projects are true works of art. I wish we were close enough for me to apprentice under you.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Dec 12th, 2014, 7:16am
Wooden brake blocks it is then. Thanks Tom
The louver panels had me worried. There's 12 of them requiring well over a hundred slots. If not done accurately, it would look awful.
The obvious path for cutting angled slots would be 1/16 slot drill on the mill with manual indexing, but I didn't have enough supports, nor is the horizontal (Y axis) good enough for multi repeats. Sooo....
Remove toolpost on lathe cross slide. Mount pillar drill vice using some 50 x 10 packers. Drill and tap 2 12mm holes in cross slide ( scary doing that to a brand new megadollar machine).  Remove slitting sawblade from its arbor and make a longer, stronger arbor from 1 1/2" bar,  and Bob's your uncle, angle slot mass production
Using the digital readout means even a plodder like me can make nice slots.
 
See what you can do now with a lathe, Moose.   Model T parts maybe
Pete
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Dec 14th, 2014, 3:43pm
on Dec 12th, 2014, 7:16am, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Wooden brake blocks it is then. Thanks Tom
The louver panels had me worried. There's 12 of them requiring well over a hundred slots. If not done accurately, it would look awful.
The obvious path for cutting angled slots would be on the mill with vertical indexing, but I didn't have enough supports, nor is the vertical (Z axis) good enough for multi repeats. Sooo....
Remove toolpost on lathe cross slide. Mount pillar drill vice using some 50 x 10 packers. Drill and tap 2 12mm holes in cross slide ( scary doing that to a brand new megadollar machine).  Remove slitting sawblade from its arbor and make a longer, stronger arbor from 1 1/2" bar,  and Bob's your uncle, angle slot mass production
Using the digital readout means even a plodder like me can make nice slots.
 
See what you can do now with a lathe, Moose.   Model T parts maybe
Pete

 
COOL!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jan 8th, 2015, 3:28am
Still too hot to build track, so some progress on the horse car. One side takes shape and louvers don't look too bad.
Posted by: Henry Posted on: Jan 8th, 2015, 3:41pm
Not bad at all! They look very nice!
 
Henry
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jan 9th, 2015, 3:12am
I fear the build will be a slow one as there are several things belonging to others that need fixing  
Here's one, a pair of drive trucks for a largish diesel. The owner kinda needs some help, but he got a fair way before putting his hand up. One done, one to go
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jan 9th, 2015, 3:22am
Also is a ballast wagon which I have been given the go ahead, but the design is not quite finalised.
Meanwhile I have materials for a model of water wagon as used by the Heritage fleet, to go behind restored steamers.  I discovered in my research, that it is based on a modern (high speed) freight wagon frame.  It has a spine rather than a chassis, so all the fiddly bits are on show (along with my dodgy welding) but it is progressing fairly rapidly.
Now I need to find some 12" dia tank ends, any ideas?
Pete
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Jan 10th, 2015, 8:40pm
Pete,
In another forum I've seen a discussion on how to make convex hemispherical tank car ends. The ideas given were metal spinning (see my posts on making a steam dome), cutting down a wok cooking pan, cutting the ends out of a propane tank*, or using a welded pipe cap.  Or you can order one from these guys (see page 3):
http://www.realtrains.com/files/83950561.pdf
 
*special precautions required!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jan 11th, 2015, 5:32am
Thanks Dan. I particularly like the wok idea.
The Real Trains part is almost exact match for the prototype but shipping is a bit painful.
Pete
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Jan 11th, 2015, 7:18pm
on Jan 11th, 2015, 5:32am, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Thanks Dan. I particularly like the wok idea.
The Real Trains part is almost exact match for the prototype but shipping is a bit painful.
Pete

 
 
cool beans!  ...so where ya gonna get the scale briggs-stratton engine?  
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jan 12th, 2015, 3:22am
Answer 1....find a really small mower shop
Answer 2....Put one of these on the other end and nobody will notice.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jan 12th, 2015, 3:39am
Meanwhile, "modern" frame ready for vintage tank and periferals (and maybe Briggs and Stratton pump)
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jan 15th, 2015, 10:06pm
A bit of a break and the threatened workshop tidy up has struck. New short racks hold the cow cars, releasing wall space for everybody else's stuff
Even swept the floor, emptied the bins and thinned out the "one day I'll need it" bins. Now I can swing the cat again, what comes next? I know, make some new mess
Pete
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Jan 19th, 2015, 9:38pm
Color me green with envy. My shop/garage is so packed right now, I have to straddle "junk" just to use the mill. I like your car storage racks.
 
Bobby
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jan 20th, 2015, 1:45am
Bobby, A shed is a man's right. Junk in that shed is proof of ownership and is beyond "she who must be obeyed" and is the equivalent of marking the territory.  Cleaning up junk is admitting that "she" is boss
There is no "she" here, so I can clean up as often as I like.  However there must be some new mess ready to replace the old.
So I've started the ballast car
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jan 20th, 2015, 1:50am
It has three 3 x 3 gates which exit 3/8" above rail height. It is an attempt to make a spreader that can be operated by one person as the ballast should stop running as soon as it gets level with the top of the rail. Stopping and starting shouldn't affect the quantity dumped, and none should get on top of the rail.
That's the theory If you don't get any more pics, you'll know it didn't work.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 1st, 2015, 2:49am
A shot of the dump doors. I've never looked closely at a spreader so hopefully this will cut the ice
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 1st, 2015, 2:54am
And the finished article. (on temporary trucks) It works OK dumping rock on the patio, I'll try it next weekend under critical club eyes!  Maybe they'll love it and want to buy it off me
Pete
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Feb 1st, 2015, 8:24pm
Something I've seen on similar ballast-spreading cars is to put a grading blade between the hopper doors and the truck/bogie, so the stone is leveled out (and any excess pushed to the sides) before being run over by the wheels.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 9th, 2015, 3:08am
Took the ballast wagon to the club's track maintenance day.   Not only did it work like the proverbial charm (pic shows dump run with ballast as dumped, before any clean-up) but that wagon is now sold and I have orders to make 2 more. The club will also buy my own wagon after I finish my line. (and borrow mine in the meantime).
So much for a quiet retirement
Pete
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Feb 10th, 2015, 7:12pm
on Feb 9th, 2015, 3:08am, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Took the ballast wagon to the club's track maintenance day.   Not only did it work like the proverbial charm (pic shows dump run with ballast as dumped, before any clean-up) but that wagon is now sold and I have orders to make 2 more. The club will also buy my own wagon after I finish my line. (and borrow mine in the meantime).
So much for a quiet retirement
Pete

 
COOL!
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Feb 11th, 2015, 5:18am
Hi Pete
 
How about mounting a broom behind the outlet to spread the ballast?
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 12th, 2015, 2:52am
Steen. The owner of the track have a broom mounted on the cow catcher (pilot) of the smiley train to clean off sticks and snakes and small children Although it circulates several times every day, all it seems to do is throw the rock back on to the rails.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 12th, 2015, 2:54am
I was thinking along the lines of a rotary snow broom, but here in the tropics nobody sells them. Anyone shed any more light?
Meanwhile it's manual labour again
Pete
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Feb 16th, 2015, 3:05am
Hi Pete
 
Brooms are also used for other things than snow....
 
I found this company in the Brisbane area: http://www.digga.com.au/mini-broom.html

 
Digga Qld - Head Office
4 Octal Street, Yatala, Qld 4207
info@digga.com | www.digga.com
p: 07 3807 3330 | f: 07 3807 1499
Toll-free: 1300 2 DIGGA  
 
Maybe you can get some used brooms?
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 17th, 2015, 12:38am
I was thinking of something simpler. Not for myself cos I like K.I.S.S. and I am fully trained in the use of a broom!
Ironically the Digga group is owned by the daughter of one of our club members who has asked me to build a couple of ballast wagons. I'm sure they could do a deal for him
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 17th, 2015, 12:41am
Meanwhile I have ventured out into the sunshine. In reply 423 there's a pic of Canungra future station. This is it today
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 17th, 2015, 12:44am
I tried a new support idea to hold the posts while concreting. As a result I was able to plant 40 posts in 4 days including excavating the gravel for concrete.
I wonder why my body hurts
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 2nd, 2015, 1:36am
Track cleaning is a drag, so I thought I'd make it more interesting.
 
#1 Take one mower
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 2nd, 2015, 1:39am
#2   Add some rail wheels to the front
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 2nd, 2015, 1:42am
#3    Plus a couple more on to the drive axle (it's a self propelled mower )
 
This is the rail drive mode
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 2nd, 2015, 1:47am
And when you adjust the height lever to max, the land wheels take over.
 
I wasn't sure the drive was strong enough to carry a passenger, but I saw a vid of a kid towing himself on a skateboard behind a mower,  so there could be a development
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 19th, 2015, 8:20am
Back again... Took a few weeks off after falling off the new embankment while reversing the loaded trailer.  No permanent damage ( bruised gall bladder when rider mower landed on top of me).   Made me reassess the way I carry loads.  Reassigned the blue tractor mower to mowing   and finished the conversion of the tipper.
Also made a quick release of the trailer in case of further misadventure. Tipper has Eaton drive so can be operated without needing to be seated.  Much, much safer and should have been done ages ago.  Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 19th, 2015, 8:24am
So got out and finished the bridge and the prep for the terminus.  pete
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Apr 19th, 2015, 11:09am
Glad to hear u r OK.  Heavy things on our body aren't necessary good for us!
 
Tom C.
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Apr 20th, 2015, 5:48am
Hi Pete
 
Good to see you back in shape.
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Apr 20th, 2015, 6:37pm
on Apr 20th, 2015, 5:48am, Steen_Rudberg wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Hi Pete
 
Good to see you back in shape.

 
Ditto Pete!
 
great stuff...so how about a video of it working!!!
 
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 28th, 2015, 3:06am
See what I can do, Moose.
Meanwhile, Rob found a rotary broom head for a line trimmer, looks like it will do a great job if a support bracket with little wheels is added.  What do you think, Steen?
Pete
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Apr 29th, 2015, 5:01am
I like that
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 16th, 2015, 1:11am
Still head down, bum up.   Roadbase for 500 feet of trackbed, with a 20 minute round trip from the "quarry".  Nowhere to turn around on this stretch, so I loaded the trailer with forest trimmings on the return trip and returned via the vegetation dump. That made it a 40 minute round trip but it's nearly clean all the way now.
This is the abandoned triangle all tidied up with drain channel and walkpath.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 16th, 2015, 1:14am
A week of 8hr days and this is the end of the line, looking back.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 16th, 2015, 1:25am
I don't trust my measuring for the turntable, so I'll build the turnouts first, then accuracy is more likely.
So far I've managed to make it so that a train can travel the whole line without having to throw a switch. At the terminus three spring loaded switches put the loco in line with the turntable, but in order to make sure that a 14 foot engine can fit between turnouts, I'm making super-long exit built in to the first turnout.
This is the setup roughed out in aluminum. enclosed by a triangle of measuring tapes.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 16th, 2015, 1:28am
This is then transferred back to the shop so I can weld the assembly up in steel bar, after which it can be cut into manageable bits.
Pete
Posted by: tomc Posted on: May 18th, 2015, 10:45am
Head down, bum up.  That is the problem with small scale steam! A lot of bending to build or fix!
 
Tom C.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 21st, 2015, 3:15am
The turntable frame makes a great welding bench!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 21st, 2015, 3:18am
A final trial fit, then on with ties, and off to the terminus.
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: May 24th, 2015, 8:15pm
on May 21st, 2015, 3:18am, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
A final trial fit, then on with ties, and off to the terminus.

 
Cool!  Show some more!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 26th, 2015, 2:31am
More, he said.....
Couldn't drag switches through the bush, so put on disconnects as far as head of steel, then swapped to tipper for the last bit.
second one first  
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 26th, 2015, 2:32am
And first one second
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 26th, 2015, 2:34am
A quick wipe of the roadbase on the way to unload. Base only needs light touchup for rail now.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 26th, 2015, 2:37am
Arriving with the No 1 switch. I bought a new camera, Bobby, now I can do "selfies"
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 26th, 2015, 2:39am
Bit of wriggles and it's in.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 26th, 2015, 2:41am
And the double switch done.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 26th, 2015, 2:43am
Still some daylight left so I dug out the turntable pit. Concrete base tomorrow maybe.
Will that keep you going for a while, Moose
Pete
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: May 28th, 2015, 7:33pm
Pete, That is a really nice looking track. Selfie not bad either.
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: May 30th, 2015, 2:49pm
on May 28th, 2015, 7:33pm, BobbyT wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Pete, That is a really nice looking track. Selfie not bad either.

 
Pete:  What BobbyT said!  And oh, I was going to ask you about the trackside shrines to 'Mother Mary', but I cleaned my glasses and saw that it was the RofW markers!
 
Good work and many blessings for the railway!
 
Moose
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 10th, 2015, 1:44am
Got some competition now Bobby is back for stage 2.
Time to drag out a pack of rail and get ready. 3rd switch ready to go in the back.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 10th, 2015, 1:47am
First half of passing loop. Plenty of ties, rail drilled and painted (don't like shiny silver.)
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 10th, 2015, 1:51am
Day 2, everything sorted for a full day.
 
Drill....check
Screws....check
3 batteries....check
joint bars...check
Screwdriver and spanner....check
extra ties....check.
bottle of drink....check
 
OK let's go.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 10th, 2015, 1:57am
Der,   got all the way to head of steel (15 minute trip) only to find there was no socket in the drill. So much for early start.  Go back, have another coffee, try again.
Pete
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Jun 10th, 2015, 9:43am
ain't that a pisser!  Hope coffee was good.
 
Tom C.
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Jun 12th, 2015, 7:49am
Maybe it is time for a check list on paper
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Jun 13th, 2015, 10:53am
NO respectable man would have a checklist would they?
 
Tom C.
Posted by: Steen_Rudberg Posted on: Jun 14th, 2015, 6:54pm
I have some......
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 21st, 2015, 2:14am
[quote author=Steen_Rudberg.    I have some......]
 
So do I, if only I could remember where I put them
 
Some unseasonal rain meant workshop time, so since I'm sick of climbing over the turntable, I had better finish it.  Orange crane to the rescue (this thing is seriously heavy).
Here it is upside down, showing the excavator slew bearing fitted.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 21st, 2015, 2:19am
And here with little trainer wheels and a coat of paint, ready for the deck timbers.  The dual bearings on the end are for locating in a channel on the land track.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jun 21st, 2015, 2:46am
That's the last of structures built (the 5th and last switch is hiding in the background) so the order of the day is tracklaying, as the vehicle access is gone and all supplies now have to go by rail or take a very long detour via "middle earth".  Tipper just delivered ties, rail bender on board, with tools and screws (another 2000 should do!) and railmotor ready to play freight train.
I have had a long think about the future of the track as I have not succeeded in getting a "Buckingham" crew to come on board,  I've cancelled all further track for the foreseable future. Instead I will concentrate on improving the fleet, doing occasional builds for others, and catch up with some maintenance and gardening.
At the recent convention I weakened and bought castings for a Queensland C17 loco, so all spare machinery (orange shovel in particular) and rail and ties will be sold, to fund purchase of more pieces of metal to mutilate. A complete loco is seriously outside my current comfort zone.....wish me luck! Pete
Posted by: JWB46 Posted on: Jun 23rd, 2015, 6:40pm
Good day Pete, as you know I have been following your efforts from back in the Gn15 days.  
I'm afraid I get exhausted just reading your post with the accounts of your days work. You have gone way beyond what I would even dare to dream of doing, then again I chop and change my interest more often than my underwear  
As for people helping, our club is on the verge of collapse because at most there is only 2 or 3 who are really interested in pitching in and cripples like me only get in the way.
 
Have a good one....John (southpass)
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 2nd, 2015, 2:51am
I feel your pain, John. Our club track needs major work, but it's very hard as trains run all day 7 days a week and our members are getting older and frailer.
Meanwhile, back at home.....
At last the rail has reached the terminus.
 I've used 60 x 20ft lengths, which makes 600 feet of new track, divided into crew numbers, that makes 600feet each  
Here the first train brings in the turntable on disconnects.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 2nd, 2015, 2:54am
Turntable was to be done by orange shovel, but because it is so far to walk it I thought I'd try manual labor first. Once again the steaming bay and unloader panels get reassigned.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 2nd, 2015, 2:59am
That worked, A couple of celebratory spins, then it's time to head back. The railmotor has one low gear in reverse, so being able to turn saves a 1200ft crawl.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 14th, 2015, 4:32am
On the list of jobs to do before the orange shovel leaves, moving the pile of ballast and spreading with the new ballast wagon.  10 tons moved in 2 days without lifting a shovel
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 14th, 2015, 4:34am
This is a screen grab of the pattern left by the dump doors. Later I'll sweep it out, then do a second run on the outers only. I'll try and get a good movie of it in action
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 14th, 2015, 4:46am
The loading ramp has been dug lower is to become a single steaming bay with loader moved 12 feet down the hill (giving higher deck)
The 2 posts are power and water points, and that completes the list of jobs, so time to load up and ship out.
Pete
Posted by: Henry Posted on: Jul 14th, 2015, 10:40am
It looks like that ballast dumper works great! I look forward to video of it in action.
 
Henry
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Jul 19th, 2015, 1:23pm
on Jul 14th, 2015, 10:40am, Henry wrote:       (Click here for original message)
It looks like that ballast dumper works great! I look forward to video of it in action.
 
Henry

 
Amen, Henry!  
 
Pete:   Wow!  I've got to go there when I retire!!!!  Great work!
 
Moose
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 21st, 2015, 3:52am
You better hurry, Moose, or all the work will be done
 
This is the last of tracklaying, pic taken from the headshunt of the terminus.
 I had a quick count, there's 1050 metres (5/8ths mile) of mainline, and a non-stop trip of 1900 metres (1 1/4 miles) is possible.  I sold the remaining 2600 feet of rail and a couple thousand ties.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 21st, 2015, 3:54am
Ballast is now by the "manual" method. Finally I get to knock the paint off the four year old shovel.  
I've called an "Unmeet" for 29th August so there's a ton of detailing to do before then.
Pete
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Jul 21st, 2015, 9:51am
Hi Pete,  With the stone higher than the hopper, u will use less energy shoveling it in.  You need a front end loader on your tractor to make it even easier.  Lookin good!
 
Tom C.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 23rd, 2015, 12:46am
No tractor, Tom. The entire track building collection of vehicles is sold to another train crazy and is now south of the border building a new train track.  All I have left is one rider mower and a couple of wheels for a garden trailer, plus a collection of rail wagons and tools.
I've also returned all the borrowed stuff that people kindly lent me, like log disconnects, trucks, gon frame and 2 mowers and trailers. Gee the shed looks empty!
 The plan is to use rail wagons (like you do) and hope  that there are no issues that might require machines. If I'm wrong then I'll just have to hire or borrow (or take a pill and lie down till the urge to fix the problem passes )
Loading from the ute is not hard, and the ballast stays clean that way. Pete
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Jul 27th, 2015, 8:49pm
Well Pete, The benefit of not adding more track..... you now have time to play with the trains on the track. I hope your "Unmeet" is a success. I ask that you hoist one in honor of those of us that can't join you this year.
 
Bobby
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 5th, 2015, 8:42pm
Took the No5 ballast wagon to a local club for show and tell, and came home without it, but a healthier bank balance. Now I only have the "coffin car" for maintenance . Here I'm reinstating the forest litter.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 5th, 2015, 8:44pm
The unloader/steaming bay is in. Just got to trim those pickets. The steel tube posts are offcuts from screw piers, that I found in a dumpster....very handy!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 5th, 2015, 8:50pm
And finally opened the new section for traffic by changing the priority at the triangle, to the new main line.  Only one page of jobs left to do before the visitors get here
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 20th, 2015, 9:24am
All ready for the unmeet next week.
Meanwhile I made a start on the new loco. Lots of castings, but no frames or tender bits. This is what it should look like
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 20th, 2015, 9:25am
This is what I got
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 20th, 2015, 9:32am
Then, out of the blue, I was offered a part build by an esteemed modeller who wanted to give up building ( at 84!)  Of course I jumped at the chance, as it would shorten the build by several years. It also had a tested boiler.Now I have lots of bits (though not interchangable as they come from different sources) so the duplicated stuff can be resold later.
I even have some failed bits to examine and work out how to build them better.
Pete
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Sep 6th, 2015, 7:25pm
on Aug 20th, 2015, 9:32am, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Then, out of the blue, I was offered a part build by an esteemed modeller who wanted to give up building ( at 84!)  Of course I jumped at the chance, as it would shorten the build by several years. It also had a tested boiler.Now I have lots of bits (though not interchangable as they come from different sources) so the duplicated stuff can be resold later.
I even have some failed bits to examine and work out how to build them better.
Pete

 
Congrats Pete!  Absolutely COOL!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 8th, 2015, 1:54am
Just couldn't resist making a start. The tender frame sorted. Hey, i am becoming a rivet counter!  Now back to work on louvre panels
Saved a bit on the boiler fund so tossed up between buying a much better mill, or subletting the cylinder build to a real engineer.  Took the second option as I do not have the skills or a mentor to call on, despite lots of reading and searching.
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 8th, 2015, 2:06am
Meanwhile, the unmeet went off really well. Nearly 40 people, 8 locos (4 steam). Many snags and soda and chat.  Bi-direction single line wouldn't work with tokens so I made a diagram, cadjoled Barry into the job of dispatcher, and ran Central Traffic Control for the day.  10 stations, 5 control sections, 6 places to pass and 8 trains.
Considering nobody had run the track since finished, it worked well. No cornfield meets, no "dummie spits", not much waiting, and lots of smiles.
 
Here's the dispatch desk (idea copied from Comanche and Indian Gap, Texas).
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 8th, 2015, 2:15am
Action at the steaming/ loading bay.
 
image Darryl Green Pix
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 8th, 2015, 2:22am
Rush hour at Lamington (must be lunchtime!)
Faimont and 3 truck Shay up front, 1871 Ballarat to the left, My B15 train followed by my railmotor.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 8th, 2015, 2:27am
Crossing at Chillagoe
 
 
 
image D.G.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 8th, 2015, 2:31am
3 trucker.   Spark arrester looks like it was designed by KKK
 
 
image D.G.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 8th, 2015, 2:33am
Ballarat on the trestle.
 
 
 
image by D.G.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 8th, 2015, 2:40am
70 class diesel with the Club Cars, waiting to turn at Canungra
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 8th, 2015, 2:44am
"Rosie" unloading, while yours truly takes special tourists (my ex-employer)
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 8th, 2015, 2:54am
Cattle train leaves the terminus, ably driven by Will P.   He drove all day, as I was way too busy.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 8th, 2015, 3:12am
Turning the railmotor on the (unfinished) turntable at the end of the line
Barry the dispatcher, with his notes, doing a familiarisation run prior to taking his seat at the desk.   He handled it like an expert.
Pete
 
 
 
image D.G.
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Sep 8th, 2015, 9:11am
Nice!  Thanks for the pics.
 
Tom C.
Posted by: Henry Posted on: Sep 8th, 2015, 10:29am
That looks like it was a lot of fun! May you have many more unmeets!
 
Henry
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Sep 9th, 2015, 5:22pm
I'm curious about the "Ballarat". Why so much space between the front and rear driver axles? I guess the Whyte designation of this would be an 0-2------2-0?
Also, what is a "dummie spit"? Maybe what we in the U.S. would call a "Mexican standoff", where two people (on locomotives occupying the same track) face off, expecting the other to back up?
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Sep 10th, 2015, 1:13am
Hi Dan, Ballaarat was a strange beast built in Melbourne for  West Australian goldmine work (several thousand miles away). Reputed to be the first loco built in Australia.  Valve gear is sort of Stevenson, but taken from the front axle, toward the rear, then turned round, cranked over the axle and aimed between the cylinders!  Pistons, however, drive the rear axle. Very odd, but makes sense when you see the very deep firebox and find out it had a well-tank but no tender.
 
Even more creepy is that the foreman who built the original, John Walker, left Ballaarat Works to head north into the unknown, and started Walkers Engineering, and then produced my loco, the B15, their second production job. Walkers is now a major concern.
 
Try this link;
 
www.lrrsa.org.au/LR224_3-11.pdf
 
Dummy = pacifier  
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Sep 16th, 2015, 5:36pm
Peter, It looks like your unmeet was a rousing success! Congrats my friend!
 
Bobby
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 14th, 2015, 11:12pm
Summer in the shop. Close the doors and crank up the air con.  Lots of jobs, mostly for others, but include the two drovers (cowboys) wagon.
One of them finished, here shown at a local club show day.  I promise never again to do louvres, there must be 200 hrs in there.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 14th, 2015, 11:17pm
The drover obviously likes it!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 14th, 2015, 11:18pm
But the dog is definately not in a good mood.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 14th, 2015, 11:24pm
The radio controlled brakes have been removed from the the country coach (too far for radio reception) and reinstalled in here.  This wagon rides immediately behind the loco and stays on even when on turntable. It also has batteries, 5 gallons spare water and of course, a sound system. From Jim's Trains, this one plays the sound of upset horse whinnying and trying to kick down the doors!
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 18th, 2015, 6:48pm
And a carriage for sale to a local club who wish to run "reduced mobility" passengers.  Allows for easy access for frail aged (that's most of us these days) and kids with walking difficulty and some autism variants.
Most wagons that I have seen for "special people" are butt ugly boxes that regard special people as a liability.  I have chosen to make mine attractive enough that all passengers would like to travel in them. This wagon will be available to all, but with a priority to special people and their carers. Special person sits in center seat, with passive restraint sides, while carers can sit in front and/or behind.
Based on a well known icon, the "Sunlander" tourist train, this wagon boasts very low center of gravity (floor is only 1 1/2" above rail) comfortable boat seats, small buffet tables, grab rails. and trick paint job.
Still to complete final trials, but looking positive.  Might lead to another wagon for wheelchairs later.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 18th, 2015, 6:49pm
And platform side view.
 
Pete
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Nov 19th, 2015, 8:01am
Tiss spiffy.  Nice job!
 
Tom C.
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Dec 26th, 2015, 9:35pm
on Nov 18th, 2015, 6:49pm, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
And platform side view.
 
Pete

 
Pete, all I can say is "WOW"!  What a train!  Nice job, my friend.
 
Moose
 
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Jan 17th, 2016, 4:11pm
hi pete!
 
some news for you that I should have passed some months ago....there's movement on the kc brake system!   DG has graciously taken on the task of drawing it up, which he has done.  He and I are in the process of checking dimensions.  DG more than I, but also he is trying to come up with a way that it can be printed without some of the problems that he discovered like printing horizontal ledges.  I'm hoping that the finished printing code can be utilized by anyone with an rp printer.  He hopes to be able to print it as home and then compare to what shapeways can do with it.
 
I can't thank you enough for your trust....and patience!
 
 
moose
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Apr 17th, 2016, 5:08pm
Pete, how are things "down under" mate?
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 18th, 2016, 4:28am
Hi Bobby.   While you lot have been disappearing under floods and snow, this end of the world has turned into a desert. Nudged 130 several times.  Needless to say, there hasn't been much going on outside. My accident slowed me down more than expected, but some medication and significant diet changes has worked and now its all under control.
Several project litter the shop. The steam loco required a different motion layout to the original, so I had a go at making the casting required. This is the wooden pattern and the gunmetal product.  I wasn't real impressed with the casting, but it didn't cost much.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 18th, 2016, 4:34am
A hit with the sand blaster and some time on the mill, and I'm happy with the results.
A friend who runs an engineering shop offered to do some of the critical repairs and mods to the chassis (it had several errors} so I assigned a dollar figure and said "stop when that runs out" Next month might have me an air chassis. Bargain!!
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Apr 19th, 2016, 6:45pm
on Apr 18th, 2016, 4:34am, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
A hit with the sand blaster and some time on the mill, and I'm happy with the results.
A friend who runs an engineering shop offered to do some of the critical repairs and mods to the chassis (it had several errors} so I assigned a dollar figure and said "stop when that runs out" Next month might have me an air chassis. Bargain!!

 
Pete:  you are truly amazing!  Wow, seems to be the only thing I can say!  Everything you've presented looks great!
 
I fully understand about accidents, I've been trying not to have to have surgery on my right knee after having torn something in it.  Been almost 6 months...
 
Finally, some good news.  Our friend Dale has been working on and off on 'printing' the KC brake system that you forwarded to me.  Once he has it printing properly(doesn't like to do ledges), I'll forward a copy back to you along with the file.  In other forums, people talk about how easy it is to draw and print something...I'm still wondering what universe they are from.  Maybe I just don't have enough time to spend with it to get good, hmmmm.  Went to a 'Makers' Faire' recently and saw how 'easy' was to print stuff....well, easy to print something from an established 3d library.  Nobody seems to have a 'choo-choo' parts library.
 
Anywho, keep up the great work!!
 
 
moose  
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 20th, 2016, 1:50am
Hi Moose. I was asked the other day for a unit for 1" scale, hopefully that file can be transcribed for other scales which would be great.
If you like mutilated metal, I tried an idea for the sheet metal for a welded tender on the steamer. Instead of a frame and countersunk rivets, i got the local agricultural engineer to fold some 2mm (5/64) sheet.  First he put a strip in the brake and folded it. Then put another strip on top and folded again. This made inside radius bigger. Then he put the sheet in, making 3 thicknesses, and pressed again. Result, smooth roll with outside radius of 10mm (3/8')
That made the bottom roll. I then made a brake roll for my press, to form the corner, and drew up a template on cardboard.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 20th, 2016, 1:53am
A check with an offcut of aluminium.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 20th, 2016, 1:56am
Then on to the real thing, using the press roll
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 20th, 2016, 2:01am
A couple of baffles, a million spot welds with the little mig, and it looks the part.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Apr 20th, 2016, 2:04am
And this is the three roll corner.
 
Meanwhile the diesel / diesel is starting to come together!
 
Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 31st, 2016, 12:55am
I'm still here, just!   Work on the steamer is painfully slow, so to keep me busy I've been working on the diesel/diesel.  When I have visitors, they all want rides and steamer can only pull 3 up the steep hill and it can't be turned off at lunchtime to eat and talk. A diesel was the answer but lawnmower engines and manic electronics are not in the ball game. So this is what I come up with, so far.
Take one Kubota 3 cylinder diesel engine, marry it up to a Suzuki front wheel drive 2 speed auto box. Add some drive shafts to the front and rear, a couple of right angle gearboxes, 2 six wheel bogies and away you go. 12 wheel drive and looks, sounds, goes and smells like a diesel.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 31st, 2016, 1:06am
With only 13" between the frames, everything that stuck out got chopped (oil filter, manifold, starter, etc) and replaced with custom made parts.  Honda Civic radiator, electric water pump, remote oil filter, custom exhaust (1 1/4" wide!), gearbox mounted starter, plastic fuel tank and radiator overflow, blue air tank under Ford battery. Leaving room for the cab, on the right, to be detailed inside. The dummy fuel tank , under, hides 2 oil coolers and covers the diff, which sticks out on the other side.
Posted by: Henry Posted on: Jul 31st, 2016, 2:51am
Looking good Pete! Any chance of seeing a video of the diesel running in the near future?
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jul 31st, 2016, 8:46am
Hi Henry, This is a link to my facebook post. Should work.    
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/174843825930887/1031163223632272/?notif_t=like&notif_id=1468474938020657
Meanwhile here is a pic of the drivers controls  Red throttle on stalk, also 2 buttons for electro-pnuematic brakes (apply and release) and horn button.  Auto selector tower to left of dashboard will be inside body, just the lever sticking out.
Posted by: Henry Posted on: Jul 31st, 2016, 11:56am
Nice looking piece of work! Is that a Honda Civic radiator?
 
The Facebook page is a closed group
 
"Join this group to see the discussion, post and comment."
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Jul 31st, 2016, 10:19pm
WOW that is sweet, I want one!
 
Tom C.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Aug 2nd, 2016, 3:36am
Sorry, I'm not good with youtube. Lots of US followers on that facebook group, might be worth diving in. Yes, radiator is Honda Civic aluminum.  Went for the first big drive today. 1 1/2 miles and nothing broke! Time to start making the body.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 7th, 2016, 1:03am
A diesel  update.  After several runs I worked out better ways to do the mechanism layout. Now much tidier and easier to access. Radiator had issues with cavitating so swapped it round and made new neck and fittings. Big alternator added, had to run it backwards, but it charges fine!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 7th, 2016, 1:05am
New layout.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 7th, 2016, 1:12am
Now working on bodywork
Posted by: Henry Posted on: Nov 7th, 2016, 3:16am
Looking good! Looks like the radiator maybe keeps it too cool?
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Nov 7th, 2016, 8:02am
Hi Henry. If you mean the blue pad, its only there in case I damage the core by dropping something. No it doesn't run cool, the fan does come on occasionally in normal operation, but didn't overheat pulling 3 passenger cars up a 2% on a hot day.   Hopefully the bodywork won't restrict it, but just in case I added an extra roof vent panel which will normally be closed over. Pete
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Dec 14th, 2016, 5:24pm
It's a flat out beast, Pete!  Keep it up! Wanna see more!
 
moose
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jan 6th, 2017, 2:37am
Still making modifications. Suppose it's the down side of not following someone elses plans. Dash controls finally bear a passing resemblance to prototype, with an adapted lawn mower accelerator (red plastic wand with tortoise and hare replaced with aluminum lever and quadrant)
Wiring and airlines have been relocated below the radiator as they were being affected by heat
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jan 6th, 2017, 2:40am
Before and after, red plastic to aluminum!
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Jan 6th, 2017, 2:44am
Body slowly getting nearer to paint stage. I didn't plan on this much detail, but it seemed to deserve a little more effort. Hope you all had a great Xmas and looking forward to a good new year
Pete
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Jan 7th, 2017, 11:42am
Hi Pete!  Fantastic work!  I can't thank you enough for posting your work.  Seems like every time I re-start a project, something else comes up.  However, the Moose Meadows project has begun to come to life again!  Stopped trying new school techniques for development and I am going old school with photographs and creativity to mock up the engine. This summer should see a mock-up engine in the engine well of the vehicle.  Cheers to ya mate for keeping things real!
 
Moose
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 1st, 2017, 2:45am
Plans and drawing are so overrated, I prefer to use photos and sketches. That way I get to do everything ten times over! Grrr
Meanwhile I have a new driver, who is getting settled in and learning the controls. He's saying "take me to the paint shop!"
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Feb 1st, 2017, 2:47am
Ah, that feels better. (one more color to go)
Pete
Posted by: Henry Posted on: Feb 1st, 2017, 2:53am
Looking good Pete!
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Feb 6th, 2017, 4:35pm
Pete:  This is wonderful!  Would love to see it in person....another year closer to visiting down-under!
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Feb 8th, 2017, 1:27pm
Pete, That is absolutely brilliant. Such wonderful craftsmanship! Can't wait to see the finished piece.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 3rd, 2017, 6:13am
Busy in the paint shop.  Who's silly idea was it to have 3 colors.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 3rd, 2017, 6:20am
Now for the graphics. Signwriter sat on it for 2 weeks then rang and said he couldn't do it. He gave me some vinyl sheet no charge.  Oh well, how hard can it be.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 3rd, 2017, 6:22am
3 solid days later.....
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 3rd, 2017, 6:26am
And a few more with the clearcoat.  I've discovered I hate clearcoate!  Tomorrow The body and chassis meet if I get some help.  Pete
Posted by: Henry Posted on: Mar 3rd, 2017, 12:12pm
That looks great Pete!
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Mar 3rd, 2017, 4:20pm
Hmmm....wonder what the freight charges would be to have Pete paint my future equipment....
 
Nice work Pete!!
 
Moose
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 4th, 2017, 12:26am
on Mar 3rd, 2017, 4:20pm, moose_the_caboose wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Hmmm....wonder what the freight charges would be to have Pete paint my future equipment....
 
Nice work Pete!!
 
Moose

 
I'm sure a passenger air ticket would be cheaper  Pete
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 5th, 2017, 12:59am
Got help today. Body on but needing a bit of adjustment.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 5th, 2017, 1:02am
and with Elvis at the controls!   Pete
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Mar 5th, 2017, 10:26pm
Pete, lookin good.  I am kind of surprised that Clear Coat was more of a problem than the multi-colors and decals.  What trouble does it cause you?
 
Tom C.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: Mar 8th, 2017, 12:23am
Main prob with clear is that it is clear!!   Difficult to see the fan and difficult to gauge how thick the cover is and difficult to know when the gun is clean.  But then again as a painter I make a great bricklayer  Pete
 
final pic, tidied up and only missing the radiator intake grilles.
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Apr 14th, 2017, 10:44pm
Pete, you are having waaaaayyyy too much fun!  Looks gorgeous!  Congrats!
 
We are in the middle of beer competition season already and we've already won a couple of silver medals.  Just found out last week that we scored high(Gold Medal in fruit beer) in the first round of the Nationals and are being invited to submit samples to the 2nd and final round competitions.  So Pete, if we make it Australia in the next couple of years, does your national mail service allow yeast samples to be sent? Pete and all, CHEERS!
 
moose
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Apr 26th, 2017, 9:27pm
Peter, the Diesel looks "spot on!"    How did you attach the door panels? Did you weld them or glue them?
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 16th, 2017, 3:08am
Bobby, Doors were glued on with construction adhesive, then corners pop riveted with countersunk heads. Works well on unstressed panels.  
Finally took the diesel on a long trip South to the National Convention. All went well and I came home with trophy for "best non steam locomotive"  I'm very proud of that, it makes the long hours worthwhile. Here's the pose shot.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 16th, 2017, 3:22am
Pulled the new steamer project out into daylight. Mike has had the chassis for over a year now, and while it is coming along, it is painfully slow.  "Quick, good or cheap, pick any two" still holds good!
After starting the tender I found out that the loco is built to "true scale" which is about 2 1/8" for 3' 6" gauge. The tender frame bit the dust and I have started again, with a bit more confidence and improving skills.  Here it is with Clippard type air brakes and correct rivet detail.
Posted by: fred_55 Posted on: May 18th, 2017, 3:56am
And with a splash of satin black
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Jul 8th, 2017, 2:03pm
Pete,
 
She is a beauty for sure!!!  Congrats on the award, your hard work paid off!!!
 
moose
 
on May 16th, 2017, 3:08am, fred_55 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Bobby, Doors were glued on with construction adhesive, then corners pop riveted with countersunk heads. Works well on unstressed panels.  
Finally took the diesel on a long trip South to the National Convention. All went well and I came home with trophy for "best non steam locomotive"  I'm very proud of that, it makes the long hours worthwhile. Here's the pose shot.