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Topic Summary
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Oct 9th, 2006, 1:37pm
  Dear Friends,
 
   Last night I received a phone call from a very old, good friend of mine. He just registered here on railfan.net. I had already told him how friendly this site is. And actually, you guys have seen him already in the photos at the BCRR.
 
   He is going by SteamHeaton. I know him since he was about ten or thirteen years old from the Florida Live Steamers organization and when he was active at the Gold Coast Railroad Museum in Ft. Lauderdale. He just recently took possesion of a 1.6 scale complete running chasis of a USRA 2-8-2 Mikado.
 
   BTW, he is also a locomotive engineer for a major railroad. I sure hope all here make him welcome in the same fashion that you all made me welcome a while ago.  
 
   Take care,
 
   Bruce  
Posted by: anthonyd_SRR Posted on: Oct 9th, 2006, 5:36pm
SteamHeaton,  
Welcome to Railfan.net enjoy your stay!!!!!!!! If you need anything ask any of use, we don't bite(usally ) I mostly wonderd around the Tourist Railroads, Model trains and the Mainline.  
Welcome Aboard
-AnthonyD
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Oct 9th, 2006, 8:20pm
hey mister raritan loco!
 
where ya been!  you WILL be posting pictures of your loco for all to see.   the only loco that i know of that will run more hours in a night than bruce's erie atlantic (stopping only for coal, water, and operator necessities)??!!!?
 
for those who've never witnessed the raritan river loco, it generally sees more 'railtime' in a week of meet running than some locos see in 5 years....hmmm, maybe longer.  it's for sure that bruce has more than a few stories to tell about this fine young livesteamer!
 
btw, if you ever get rid of the raritan...just park it in my garage!  it is one of the locos that i watch the most, because it runs like a deere, er, deer.  welcome to the railfan.net threads, please do visit and post in the threads that interest you...often!
 
 
moose the caboose
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Oct 9th, 2006, 8:39pm
SteamHeaton,
Welcome aboard. Yeah, that Raritan River is some chooch.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 9th, 2006, 9:03pm
Hello,and thankyou Bruce, Matt,Anthony,and George ,for the warm welcome. This is a great site. My name is Ray Heaton, I have known Bruce since I was  around 11. I have been in the live steam hobby since 1980,when I attended my first meet , which was at John Cassady's. This was the FLS winter  meet, and the hobby in fl was at a different place ,back then. All of the tracks were on private property, and they were much smaller meets than we are used to today , but in no way any less fun. Every 3 or 4 months we would all get together at a different track , usuually the same track was used for the winter meet and the summer meet and so on. Iaquired my first loco at age  14 and had only the basic skills to run it ,but none  of the skills required to maintain it , this would come later. |I was cutting grass back then for my cash and  had to scrape together all of it  for the raritan, which was sold to me by another very good live steamer,  to make room for his next project. 25 years later I still own this engine. I  have  learned alot alongthe way including welding a new boiler for the  raritan,  the running gear is the only thing that is still original. I also aquired a  mogul about 10 years ago which i just sold to a young and very good live steamer  in fl. He is polishing the rails in largo with that one now. I am now working on a 1.6 mikado ,that I bought ,running on air . sorry for getting so long winded ,just wanted you to know a little about me , and I am also an engineer for the CN. running the real ones for  almost 20 years now . thanks again for the warm welcome , looking forward to many good articles onhere. SteamHeaton
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 9th, 2006, 9:55pm
here is a pic  of the raritan. SteamHeaton
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 9th, 2006, 10:25pm
and here is a pic of the mike chassis, which I intend to finish as a I.C. mike complete with aux tender. steamHeaton
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Oct 9th, 2006, 10:27pm

 
   I'm sort of partial to this pic of the Raritan.
Posted by: anthonyd_SRR Posted on: Oct 10th, 2006, 4:05pm
Nice pics amd engine
~AnthonyD~
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Oct 10th, 2006, 4:51pm

 
   Ray,
 
   Please post pictures as the Mikado project takes shape. I'm sure most here would be very interested in that undertakeing. Especially since most folks, even in our scale, don't do the Illinois Central. The boiler portion of the project will be VERY interesting to say the least.
 
   Take care,
 
   Bruce
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Oct 10th, 2006, 9:20pm

 
   Guys,
 
   Here are a couple of snap shots of SteamHeaton enjoying himself at the BCRR back in March of this year.
   Ray bringing the NYC Mohawk up grade to the arched bridge.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Oct 10th, 2006, 9:28pm

   and another pic. Ray running the very nicely build and operating GE Dash40-C of Dunkin Herring's. Ray commented that this engine ran so prototypicaly that he felt he was back working his regular job. Heh,heh,heh.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 11th, 2006, 2:29pm
Hello all.  Here is the business end of the raritan. The fire box on this engine is only 4x6 inches ,so you are pretty busy keeping it hot. All the important stuff ,has lights , the pressure gauge,and water glass.for night running , and the head light is wired for bright ,dim and off. Dim is nice when meeting a train.  SteamHeaton
Posted by: anthonyd_SRR Posted on: Oct 11th, 2006, 3:12pm
Nice pics
~AnthonyD~
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Oct 11th, 2006, 7:39pm
  Guys,
 
   This next photo will confirm just what I always say to you younger guys that are interested in live steam. That if, at your age, you get bit by the live steam bug, its for life. Ray (SteamHeaton) may want to kill me for posting this pic, but I just counld'nt resist.  
   It is of Ray in 1981. I don't know who's switcher it is or at what track. But its a neat picture of a very young live steamer. Sorry for the poor photo quality. It came out of the 1981 Florida Live Steamers year book.
 
   Take care,
 
   Bruce
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Oct 11th, 2006, 8:28pm

 
   Oh, BTW, did anyone notice, in reply #13, the steam pressure gauge in the cab of the Raritan reading 120 psi.  
 
   You all should see that thing running at night. Skyrockets in the night.  
 
   Br.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 12th, 2006, 11:31am
Bruce , the pic of me is at the Elder's track,and the loco is the  Hill's switcher , fort taylor and south western.  That loco was a battery powered,  koster built engine.  My grand father bought that from the Hill's and we had  alot of fun with it.  And yes thanks for posting it, I owe you one. Steamheaton
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 12th, 2006, 11:49am
The next few pics are ,the 2-8-2 chassis , All of the work up to now was completed by a gentleman from Indiana. It is running on air ,and ready for the boiler. Steamheaton.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 12th, 2006, 12:11pm
another  2-8-2 pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 12th, 2006, 12:19pm
2-8-2 pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 12th, 2006, 12:32pm
another  2-8-2 pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 12th, 2006, 12:41pm
this pic has the 2-8-2,  2-6-0, and the raritan, all in one shot.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 12th, 2006, 12:52pm
Here is Mr. ErieAtlantic 7597 himself.  The young live steamer,is the new owner of the mogul. At the time  of this pic, he had no idea ,that some day this loco would be his, and neither did I for that matter.  It could not have a more caring  owner , and a very good live steam engineer.  This pic was taken at the largo meet in 2005.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Oct 13th, 2006, 4:26pm

 
   Whos that old guy with the white hair sticking out from that dirty hat OH, THATS me!!!!  
 
   Ray, the machine work on that chasis really looks good. Can't wait to see you get going with the boiler for it. That is going to be one awesome locomotive. Knowing your workmanship, I'm sure it will run great too.
 
   Thanks for posting those pictures.
 
   Take care,
 
   Bruce
Posted by: anthonyd_SRR Posted on: Oct 13th, 2006, 4:43pm
great pics esspecially the one of Bruce
~AnthonyD~
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: Oct 13th, 2006, 7:27pm
Ray,  
welcome to the forums. Thats a very nice looking 2-8-2 chassis too!
 Bobby
Posted by: BC_and_A_railway Posted on: Oct 13th, 2006, 11:02pm
Welcome to railfan.net!  
Those are some nice looking engines.   I can't wait to see how it goes.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 14th, 2006, 12:07pm
Hello all, thanks Anthony D, Bobby,and BC&A.  I'm glad you liked the pics.  I can't wait to get started on the boiler. Hopefully in a month or 2 I will begin. Yes Bruce I will post pics of my progress.  SteamHeaton
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Nov 6th, 2006, 2:29pm

 
   Friends,
 
   Just a little update. I received a phone call this week end while over at the BCRR. It was from none other than "SteamHeaton". He informed me that within a week or so, he was going to pick up the barrel that will ultimately be the boiler for his Mikado.
Also, he has a line on 3/8th thick boiler plate to cut the flue sheets from. If I remember correctly, he said the boiler barrel will also be 3/8th thick wall.  
 
   He is going to install 3/4 ID "K" copper tubes. Believe this or not, I have the same size tubes in my Atlantic. Oh, Ray's Mikado will be coal fired.  
 
   I can't wait to see this engine project get going. But more than that, I can't wait to see it fired up and running.
 
   Take care,
 
   Bruce
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Feb 26th, 2007, 1:53pm

 
   Guys,
 
   We all had the pleasure of seeing the beautiful 2-8-2 chasis of Ray Heaton's running on air this past week end. Ray had it displayed on an improvised engine stand. Unfortuneately, I was so busy drolling over the Mikado chasis, that I totally forgot to video it running.
 
   I don't think it will be very long before we see this machine running on it's own. I say this, because I know the owner a long, long, time.
 
   Take care,  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: anthonyd_SRR Posted on: Feb 26th, 2007, 6:21pm
Great news Bruce, it would be nice to see that engine run
 
Anthony
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Feb 26th, 2007, 7:40pm
My impression of Ray Heaton is that, unlike most of us, he doesn't make much noise. He just gets it done! There is something to be said for having prototype background. It shows in his efforts and demeanor. Although, he is the politest engineer I've ever met!
 
Bruce'll keep poking him and we'll get the progress pics....
 
Greg B.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Mar 2nd, 2007, 9:03am

 
   Greg,
 
   You are so right. Ray is one of those quiet guys that hammers away till the job is done. BTW, I just received a call from him and he told me he is already haveing the smoke box rolled for the Mike. He already had in his possesion the boiler barrel and the material for the flue sheets. Man, it was so good to see that chasis running so smoothly.
 
   Knowing this guy for as long as I do and well as I do, it ain't gonna be long till the welder is growling.
 
   And, as far as his demeaner goes, I guess the responsibility of running with almost ten thousand horse power at his command, and pulling more than fourteen thousand tons of coal  behind you day after day, has a rather sobering effect on one's attitude and the way one handles one's self with other people.
 
   Yup, he has had a decent way about him since he was a teenager. Which is when I first met Ray H. (steamheaton).
 
   Take care,  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: livesteamsteve Posted on: Mar 3rd, 2007, 12:18am
SteamHeaton.......what a great purchase.  I saw that for sale on Discover Live Steam.  The RRSC Mike's are a great engine.  "Northern" Bruce has one and was tempted to purchase the one you bought, but he wound up getting a LE pacific chassis on air with boiler instead.  I look forward to seeing some progress photos as you complete the engine.
 
Steve L.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Mar 8th, 2007, 10:22am

 
   Folks,
 
   If one takes a peek at the thread Un-Meet of 07, you will see Ray Heaton, (steamheaton) running his Raritan.  Working hard climbing and rolling by.  
Bruce Saylor also invited him to run his beautiful Mikado. Some that footage is also on the video.  
 
   And just for general information, Ray is an engineer on a major railroad. And has been an engineer for about twenty years. Ray does'nt make a lot of noise about his accomplishments in this hobby. But I have no doubt that he will have that Mike running in a reasonable time frame.
 
   Take care,  
 
   Bruce  
 
Posted by: J. M. Fusco Posted on: Mar 11th, 2007, 1:16pm
on Oct 12th, 2006, 12:41pm, SteamHeaton wrote:       (Click here for original message)
this pic has the 2-8-2,  2-6-0, and the raritan, all in one shot.

Wow I can't believe the size difference!
 
That 2-8-2 chasis is huge!
Posted by: dgmarklin Posted on: Mar 11th, 2007, 9:18pm
nice work, keep the pictures coming, see ya on the tracks soon...
Welcome to Railfan.net!!!
 
I get carried away with Smileys
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Mar 14th, 2007, 11:03pm

   VIDEO of Ray Heaton running his 2-4-0 Raritan at the Buckingham Central one year ago. I just recently was given this tape. And I just could'nt help myself. I had to post a bit of it.  
 
   Ray (steamheaton) is a long time, accomplished live steamer besides being a regular engineer for almost twenty years. He has owned the Raritan since he was thirteen years of age. He has just turned forty.
 
   This short video should prove fairly interesting. Enjoy. Notice that one year ago March, there was no super structure on the arched bridge yet,  the trestle was'nt even started yet, and the main line with the "S" curve was just finished. Man, there has been a lot accomplished since then, in less than a year!!!
 
   Take care,  
 
   Bruce
 
   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ua4ZGdcFjLY
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Apr 6th, 2007, 11:09am

   Received a call from "steamheaton". The latest info on his 2-8-2 is this. Ray has in his possesion the finished smoke box. He has machined a number of the wheels for the tender. The tender body panels are on their way to Mount Vernon, Ill. from Herring Engineering in Rock Hill, SC. And Ray just purchased another new welder to augment his other welding equipment.
 
   He already has the boiler plate for the flue sheets and the boiler barrel.  
 
   So I guess, and I hope, soon we will see some photos of the progress on what will end up being a IC Mike.
 
   This should prove to be a very interesting project to watch as it progresses.
 
   Take care,  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: dgmarklin Posted on: Apr 6th, 2007, 5:18pm
Great to hear such great news on Rays engine.  Cant wait to see it running.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 7th, 2007, 10:50am
Hello, everybody.                     I am slowly getting closer to starting on the boiler.  Two weeks ago I picked up the smoke box . A friend of mine ,who had a connection on getting my smoke box rolled,  offered to help.  It was the same place he had his K-4 smoke box rolled. They did a great job, all I need to do is finish welding the seam on it .  The boiler tube and   plate are  in my garage,  I hope to start cutting the plates out  soon. Up to this point all of the boilers that I have  built, a total of 3, were stick welded together. I just purchased a tig welder. This shouldl make  the boiler  building  proccess a  little easier.  This welder will also  make the  Tender assembly  much easier.  Speaking of the tender, I just received all of the tender sheet metal yesterday. Duncan Herring, of Herring Engineering , did a wonderful job of cutting ,bending ,and  drilling all of the holes for rivets, on these parts.   I will post some  pics, of the smoke box and tender, which I have  clamped together ,just to get an idea of what it will look like soon.  Ray
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Apr 7th, 2007, 12:27pm
Waiting..., waiting...., waiting. C'mon, Ray. Waiting..., waiting..., waiting....
 
Greg B.
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: Apr 7th, 2007, 5:18pm
Ray, that is great news. Maybe we can have an unveiling at the next "unmeet"?
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 19th, 2007, 5:13pm
Hello to all of my live steam friends. I have taken  a few pics of the progress to date.
 The first pic is one of the tender truck wheels on my 10'' southbend lathe. This lathe  dates back to the 40's,but still does a great job.  I have  1 wheel completed ,7 to go. I might  use a pair of Tom Bee trucks temporarily, if  it gets to close to the Un-Meet 2008.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 19th, 2007, 5:17pm
here is another pic of the wheel
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 19th, 2007, 5:31pm
The next few pics ,are of the tender, that I just finished  hammering in 800+ rivets. The steel is ordered for the tender frame.  I hope to  start  welding the frame together in about 2 weeks , as soon as the steel arrives. The tender was cut out, drilled, and bent by Duncan Herring  of Herring Engineering. He used an article from model RR that showed all of the dimensions for  tenders   used on I.C. 2-8-2    locos.  They were long and lanky looking due to there being stretched out from 11,000 to 13,000 gals, and the 4 wheel truck even makes them look longer. Duncan did  an awesome job. i can't wait to see it  complete.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 19th, 2007, 5:44pm
another tender pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 19th, 2007, 5:48pm
another tender pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 19th, 2007, 5:56pm
boiler tube, this is  a 10'' pipe
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 19th, 2007, 6:02pm
here is a pic of the side sheet getting rivets, these are only cosmetic. they are not holding anything together.
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Apr 19th, 2007, 6:18pm
Well worth the wait, Ray. Thanks.  
 
Greg B.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Apr 19th, 2007, 8:36pm

 
   HOLY MACKERAL !! Thats gonna be sumthin. Great pics Ray. Can't wait for the next installement.
 
   Take care,  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: May 4th, 2007, 9:07am

 
   Friends,
 
   Just a little update on this project of Ray Heaton's. I know you won't hear it from him, because he is sort of quiet about his own accomplishments. Which are many BTW.
 
   Ray has done a lot of study on the IC Mikados. He even made a trip to a distant town to photograph and measure a preserved locomotive that shares many of the same attibutes of the IC 2-8-2.
 
   He has recently pruchased an older but hardly used heavy welder. After speaking to him just a few days ago, he informed me that he is geting his welding skills back up to speed. By what he told me, he is going to receive the steel for the tender under frame this week. I guess that will get put together first. but he did get his smoke box back from a local machine shop. And he already has the material for the flue sheets, inside and  outside fire box sheets, crown sheet, plus as is shown in the pic, the boiler barrel. I guess we will see pics of the boiler being built one of these days.
 
   Keep in mind that this young man runs very heavy coal trains for a liveing, raises horses on his thirty some acres of land, and is an accomplished bee keeper.Oh, he and his wife of twenty years, have raised two fine children too. As can be surmised, Ray is a doer, not a talker. I've known this young man since he was about thirteen. No computer chair for him. No peering for hours at RR web sites just so he could quote this and that. Is he a dreamer? Yes! But Ray Heaton turns his dreams into reality. He never got stuck, as so many have, at the dream stage of things.  
   
   I'm proud to know him. And,,, he is probably going to kill me for writeing this post.
 
   I can't wait to see his IC Mikado. Knowing the builder, I know it will be something.
 
   Take care,  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: dgmarklin Posted on: May 4th, 2007, 8:19pm
I would say Run Bruce, dont let ray get you!  BUT, I think his engine and yours are a close race, it would end up being indiana jones style train scenes.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 20th, 2007, 11:39pm
I have finally , started  the  boiler !!!!!!!  I placed the  boiler barrel on a set of saw horses and layed out the lines of the fire box area.  This part of the pipe will have to be cut away, to make room for the  outside sheets . This boiler is  a totally different story  , the raritan boiler was  fairly easy to move around during construction.  Not this one! i used the tractor to  place the pipe on the saw horses.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 20th, 2007, 11:53pm
another pic of me scribing the lines ,to guide me with the torch.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 21st, 2007, 12:03am
This next pic is a tool I made when I welded for a living , back in the mid 80's. It is pretty simple  but really helps when you are cutting a straight line. It is a piece of round stock welded to a  piece of flat bar. the flat bar is  where your clamp goes, and the round stock is your guide. straight cut every time.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 21st, 2007, 12:08am
another pic of my guide tool
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 21st, 2007, 12:16am
this is a pic of the lines  I have scribed.  notice the hole drilled at the intersect of the 2 lines. I do this, so when the torch gets to that point , it makes for a nice clean finish.  when I cut the other line, I will run right into the drilled hole again, nice clean corner.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 21st, 2007, 12:22am
Here I am adjusting the torch, after cleaning the tip.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 21st, 2007, 12:31am
here is a pic of the first cut. Check out  that custom strap on my goggles, it has  been on there for a long time, I mean years and years  LOL.  The strap broke and I needed to keep working , so I imprvised, that  is an elastic band from a retired pair of underware. It kept me working that night, but now it is  just something I laugh at almost every time I put them on.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 21st, 2007, 12:37am
A pic of the final cut.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 21st, 2007, 12:41am
after the final cut was made , just a tap of the hammer was all that was needed to remove the  lower  piece of pipe.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 21st, 2007, 12:46am
the first step  on the boiler is now complete.  the next couple of pics willbe of the barrel with the piece removed and  one pic with the smoke box  sitting on the end of the tube to give you an idea of how big this boiler will be.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 21st, 2007, 12:49am
another pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 21st, 2007, 12:52am
side view
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 21st, 2007, 12:54am
pic with smoke box on the end for  full effect.
Posted by: pockets Posted on: May 21st, 2007, 7:45am
Way to go, Ray. Congratulations. I envy you the feeling that comes from positive progress.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: May 21st, 2007, 10:25am

 
 
 HOLY MACKERAL
 
   Now that is something !!!!! Great pictures. And, from a dress style view, I really liked the underware elastic band on your welding gogles. Classic Ray, classic.
 
   Thanks so much for shareing the beginnings of you new boiler with us here.  
 
   Take care,  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: May 21st, 2007, 1:29pm
Ray, that is looking good! Nice cutting guide tool, tip too!
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: May 21st, 2007, 7:55pm
hi all,
 
hey ray!  now we're gettin'  somewhere!  anybody takes notes?  
 
moose the caboose
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: May 22nd, 2007, 11:26am

 
   George, Bobby, Greg,  
 
   This is the example of real work ethic in the live steam hobby. I've got a feeling we will see this locomotive running at the Un-Meet of "08".  
 
   Let er roll, Ray.
 
   Take care,
 
   Bruce
Posted by: pockets Posted on: May 22nd, 2007, 8:25pm
Ray,
check your messages at the top of the page....
 
Greg B.
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: May 23rd, 2007, 6:38am
Be ready Ray, Pockets is gonna ask for one of those goggle head bands!
Posted by: pockets Posted on: May 23rd, 2007, 7:42am
Nope...Already got one. Made mine out of bicycle inner tube!
 
Greg B.
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: May 23rd, 2007, 10:04pm
Whew! What a relief!  I thought pockets was going to say something more in the intimate apparel line!  I'm glad he ain't a gonna get a whopping from she-who-must-be-obeyed.
 
ray!  you and me gotta talk!  i gotta a whole lotta learning ta get done!  great job on the boiler...getter done!
 
moose the caboose
 
 
 
on May 23rd, 2007, 7:42am, pockets wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Nope...Already got one. Made mine out of bicycle inner tube!
 
Greg B.

Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 23rd, 2007, 10:57pm
Bruce ,Bobby,|Greg,and George.
Thanks for all the nice comments. I am definitely in boiler mode now. I am really looking forward to building  this boiler, and will keep all of you up to date on my progress  with plenty of pics.  A bike inner tube, Greg that is a good one too.
Posted by: pockets Posted on: May 23rd, 2007, 11:08pm
Guys,
I do a lot of wood working, too. My shop couldn't function without a drawer full of inner-tube scraps. I use them for everything from gluing clamps to chip guards to isolation washers. I even lined the tin belt guard of my old mill/drill with the stuff and it got quiet enough to stand next to!
 
Greg B.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 23rd, 2007, 11:09pm
After reading Bruces  post about my trip to see one of the Illinois Central  locomotives that are  on display  near my home , I remembered that I had some pics I can share with you.  I took these pics , for detail ideas.  the I.C. had a couple of things that set there engines apart from others.  The most obvious were the  pressed steel pilot, square sand box , and the hand rails on the front of the engine. i also took pics of the whistle  shroud, saftey valves and turbo gen. hope you enjoy the pics.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 23rd, 2007, 11:12pm
more detail pics,
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 23rd, 2007, 11:19pm
detail pic this pilot was  changed  to include foot boards  in its last days of service. the  pressed steel pilot  used to go all the way across.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 23rd, 2007, 11:23pm
this is the whistle shroud
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 23rd, 2007, 11:29pm
saftey valves
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: May 24th, 2007, 8:46am

 
   Nice, nice pics, Ray. I'm fairly sure that if you incorporate many of the details from this beautiful locomotive into your Mike, it will be something else. Thanks so much for posting these great pictures.
 
   take care,  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: pockets Posted on: May 24th, 2007, 9:40am
I gotta agree with Bruce..... I'll give his remarks an AMEN.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 24th, 2007, 9:10pm
Had to head for bed last night befor the caller ,called me to work. here are a few more of the  I.C. 2500. A 4-8-2 rebuilt from a 2-10-2. The gentleman in the photo, is the reason we are able to see this loco today. he spearheaded the  effort to save this  engine  back in the late 50's and early 60's.  this man is also a live steamer. who happen to make his own pattern  for 1 1/2 scale couplers and , they were poured in the Ic steam shop foundry back in the mid 50's. I am glad to have met  him and spent  time listening to his stories. BTW one of his couplers is on the front of my Ic mike. Jim was a draftsman for the IC.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 24th, 2007, 9:16pm
another  pic, cab shot
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 24th, 2007, 9:17pm
LOL forgot to load the pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 24th, 2007, 9:21pm
gen
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 24th, 2007, 9:25pm
compressor
Posted by: dgmarklin Posted on: May 24th, 2007, 9:49pm
Nice pictures!  Very nice, very nice!
 
There is nothing like climbing all over a real locomotive to get details, and details are what counts.
 
 
BTW, where is a good place to get couplers for my GE44, any idea's?  I would like some prototypical ones, like with the coupler hand bars working and such.
Posted by: Texas_Steam Posted on: May 27th, 2007, 8:10pm
on Oct 12th, 2006, 12:11pm, SteamHeaton wrote:       (Click here for original message)
another  2-8-2 pic

 
S-Heaton,
 
I like the white wire deer in the background of your garage / shop pics; are those going to be test subjects for crossings when you're done?  LoL
 
Great work on this engine.  You've been talking about it for some time now & it's good to see you're coming along nicely.
 
Mark
P.S. to those from down South - I used to do the GCRRM with Ray as well; we were fond of running the track car late @ night down Perimiter Road, under 95 & as far S. as that little spur would take us... certainly harmless fun as compared to the stuff we hear about kids doing these days.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 29th, 2007, 9:56pm
I have finally figured  all of the dimensions for the boiler.  The prints called for a piece of 1/4 " plate to be rolled .  The outside dimesion  was to be 11 5/8ths.  This would be a real headache for me to find a place to roll this for me, I found it much easier to use a  10" pipe with an o.d. of 10 3/4.  In doing this I had to refigure all of my plates.  I'm glad that part of the project is done.  Now on to the fun part  cutting drilling and fabricating. with the smaller I.D. ,I had to rearrange the tube  nest and lost  5 tubes. I cut small disc's of  1" dowel and painted them black .  This made it easy to  try diff patterns and see what worked best for me. I willpost a pic of my final tube  nest pattern.  The next day or  2 I hope to get the  3/8ths plate on the saw horses and begin cutting  out the plates.  SteamHeaton
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 29th, 2007, 10:01pm
the light pencil marks  ,that are hard to see ,will be the  actual boiler dimension.
Posted by: pockets Posted on: May 29th, 2007, 11:41pm
A remarkably simple and clever idea, Ray.
 
Greg B
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: May 31st, 2007, 10:05am

 
   Ray,
 
   Thanks so much for posting these very interesting photos. I'm fairly sure not too many folks here have seen this end of the live steam saga that a few of us have been through. Please keep these very informative pics comeing.
 
   Take care,  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 31st, 2007, 6:37pm
the actual layout of the tube nest
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Jun 3rd, 2007, 11:42pm

 
   Ray,
 
   It is so good to see someone really "getting their teeth into" this kind of a project.
As opposed to those that "talk" about what they intend to do,,, for years, or who they know and where they've been, and yet accomplish notheing.  
 
   You, Pete, Cam, Dean and a hand full of others give new meaning to  
"gettin er dun". Oh, I forgot Justin.
 
   Take care,  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 4th, 2007, 3:08pm
Thanks guys, I am really looking forward to this  project.  I will try to take lots of pics and explain in as much detail as poss.  The methods I will be using are tried and  proven to work. I am no expert , but I do feel confident enough to show you  how a boiler goes together, and  my techniques  for  building one. I built the raritan boiler  in the same manner that I will build this one and it is  now  on it's  16th year, the boiler that is , the  loco is 28.  Even though I went through welding school and welded for  a couple of years  as a trade before  starting on the railroad .  It was the guidance and mentoring from fellow live steamers that had traveled down this same  path many years before me , that gave me the courage to weld  my first boiler. There is also a great article in modeltec  magazine Feb 1987, titled guide for locomotive boiler construction. A fantastic resource and starting point , for someone  thinking about  building there own boiler. Steamheaton
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 5th, 2007, 10:11pm
I started cutting out the plates for ,the firebox today.  I used the kubota to pick the plate up which is  3/8ths x3ft x 4ft, and prob weighs  at least  200lbs.  the scrawny  saw horses in the  first pic failed the weight test, they folded up under the weight.  So I layed  2 6x6's  down on each side and put the plate on them.  I placed my templates  on the plate and traced  each one of them. I cut out the crown sheet ,and back head , today.  All of the other plates are layed out and  I should be able to get the rest , cut out tomorrow.  I just clamp my guide  tool and cut them out.  Steamheaton
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 5th, 2007, 10:16pm
laying out the plates  using my templates
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 5th, 2007, 10:20pm
plates layed out
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 5th, 2007, 10:23pm
cutting  out the crown sheet
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 5th, 2007, 10:25pm
backhead and crown leaning against boiler barrel
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 5th, 2007, 10:30pm
cutting out back head
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 5th, 2007, 10:32pm
other plates all layed out, ready  for the torch.
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Jun 6th, 2007, 10:33am
Ray,
It's a real pleasure to follow your progress. Your straightforward, no nonsense, approach is a joy to an old metalworker.
 
Thanks,
Greg B.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 6th, 2007, 3:40pm
Thanks Greg,  I'm glad you are enjoying the reports.  Hopefully we will see coal burning inside of it  in Feb.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Jun 6th, 2007, 3:43pm

 
   Greg,
 
   I could not agree with you more!! It is such a pleasure to see a person doing what he said he would do. Can't do this kind of stuff from the arm chair,,,,,,,,,,or the
computer chair for that matter either.
 
   Of course, I'm not surprised that Ray is rolling along like this. After all, when he was about seventeen, he and I changed and injector on one of the FEC Pacifics,,,,,
at night. Just hours before a move from Ft. Lauderdale to south Dade county Florida.
 
   Yup, I'm fairly sure Ray (steamheaton) will have his Mike running by next Feb.
 
   Take care.  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 6th, 2007, 10:50pm
I did get the rest of the plates cut out. 10 plates in all.  I am 2nd out and heading to bed before they call me back in. I will post the pics tomorrow.  Steamheaton
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 7th, 2007, 8:19am
Here are the pics from yesterday,  the remaining boiler plates being cut out.
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Jun 7th, 2007, 8:20am
Ray,
You must be running turns, to get so much time at home. That's good work, if you can get it and hold it.
 
Well, the burning is done... Now starts the grinding and drilling. Wish it was me!
 
Greg B.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 7th, 2007, 8:25am
just like I did , with the boiler barrel . I drilled holes in the corners  of the firebox opening , makes for a nice  place to start and stop with the torch.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 7th, 2007, 8:30am
goodmorning Greg, yes I am holding a chain gang turn, first in first out. there are 6 of us  protecting this pool. They actually let me sleep in my own bed all night, I feel as though I should go out and buy a lotto ticket.  You will post pics similar to these  one day and I will enjoy looking at them as much as you are enjoying these. I have been threatening to work on this boiler for a year now. Life gets in the way and befor you know it another year has gone by. Ray  
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 7th, 2007, 8:47am
this next pic is  the tool I used to cut the front flue sheet.  You center punch a point and the pin on the tool rotates  in that  spot. There is a bearing  on the end of the tool where you  put the torch head , this makes it easy for the torch to rotate as you go around. the  pin can be adjusted up or down , to set the proper torch height, and that same block that holds the pin can also slide  in or out . This sets your radius. A simple tool but cuts a perfect circle every time.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 7th, 2007, 8:52am
torch in tool
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 7th, 2007, 8:57am
cutting firedoor opening
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 7th, 2007, 9:03am
me taking a break, befor cutting the last 4 plates. It was pretty warm yesterday, then you  put on the  leather  protector, which is the one I used  20 years ago.  You tend to heat up a bit, not to mention the torch.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 7th, 2007, 9:07am
last couple plates
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 7th, 2007, 9:12am
here are all 10 plates cut out and ready for the next step, which will be grinding bevels for welding ,and drilling tube holes, and the staybolt holes.
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Jun 7th, 2007, 7:52pm
hi ray,
 
this is the part of the hobby that i've never seen happen.  your straight forward technique makes me think that it might be possible for me to do (with a mentor's hand) in 5 or 6 more years.  i'd like to be able to cut and shape the pieces, then have it welded by someone with the experience of certified pressure vessels.  will wait and see where my journey takes me!
 
thanks and continue this invaluable lesson.
 
moose the caboose
Posted by: Slipped_Eccentric Posted on: Jun 8th, 2007, 12:19am
Nice work Ray!  Can't wait to watch as you fit all the peices then weld them together.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 8th, 2007, 1:16am
Hello George, and Justin
  George, glad you are enjoying the  updates,and yes with help and advice from livesteamers that have done this ,  you will be able to fab your own boiler, that is one of the great things about this hobby, people from so many backgrounds are found here, and you can draw from this wealth of information. I  lookforward to reading your  updates  ,and some day they will include  that boiler.
 Justin,  thanks and great to hear from you. I too am looking forward to the next couple of steps.  The fab  work will be the fun part and seeing it come together  will be great.  
Ray III
Posted by: Slipped_Eccentric Posted on: Jun 9th, 2007, 4:06pm
Ray, its great to see that you're still around in the hobby.  I always liked your no-nonsense approach to getting things done.  If things work out for me I may be able to post up a series on building a copper boiler soon.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 10th, 2007, 1:23pm
Justin that will be great,  I would  love to see a copper boiler  being assembled.  Ray III
Posted by: Texas_Steam Posted on: Jun 10th, 2007, 1:47pm
Re (from Bruce a few pages back): Keep in mind that this young man runs very heavy coal trains for a liveing, raises horses on his thirty some acres of land, and is an accomplished bee keeper.Oh, he and his wife of twenty years, have raised two fine children too.
-------------
Bruce, I had to laugh @ that... Ray & I are 40; not so much "young men" any longer.  I guess it just goes along with advancing age, some folks are always going to be 'young' to you.
 
I remember when I first met him when we were around 8 years old - the Melrose Park neighborhood in Fort Lauderdale, on Arizona Avenue.
 
He WAS the coolest kid around because he had his very own RR track around their house.  He was also in the local newspaper; they had done an article or maybe just a quick bit on him & the track... but of course the part that sealed the deal for cool-factor was they put a pic of him running a switcher & a few cars around the track (can't remember if it was a battery powered unit or the lawn mower engine; the mower was the "Fort Shelley & Southwestern" if I recall correctly).
 
Ray won't mention much about it, but his older of the two kids - Josh, is in his first year in the Navy on the Kitty Hawk (sailing out of Japan) & Brittany is doing some early college work before her senior year in high school.
 
It also looks like the possibilities of Ray being able to put in more time on his Live Steam devotion might be improving.
 
I sure wish we had a photo of that short wheelbase lawn mower powered buggy he had somehow gotten ahold of.  It was like a wheelstanding high-boy mower... if there ever was someone who was born with grease under their fingernails & metal shavings in their hair, it's got to be Ray.  He probably showers with Lava or Goop...
 
One of these days I'll find a few of my pics from the GCRR & scan a few in.
 
As for his devotion to railfanning in generral, we'll have to give a hearty nod to his Grandfather, Ray Sr.  The two things I remember most about him were trains & scouting... for most kids, it's cars & girls that get in the way of an Eagle Scout badge; for us it would probably have been trains, girls & cars (in that order).
 
Mark
 
PS: I forgot to mention... Ray has taken up the banjo in the last few years... but we won't hold that against him.  Austin Lounge Lizards: "There's no such thing as a banjo player in heaven... there's just some things even Jesus can't forgive."
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 10th, 2007, 1:54pm
thanks Mark
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 10th, 2007, 2:04pm
Well I took a day off from boiler building to attend the memorial meet held at Kenny Davis's track in Decatur IL, the second sat  each june. This was the 11th year  for me at this meet. It gets bigger each year, about  250 people attended the meet, most of those were there to ride trains.  There was no shortage of equipment either.  A total of 8 steamers fired up, the raritan, 2 moguls, a pennsy K-4, A wabash hudson, a reading 0-4-0 camel back , an american, and   a shay. Kenny's 2 engines , a wagner  hudson, and a wagner jubilee, stayed in the engine house, to leave  the  main open for visitors.   10 diesels were also pulling trains too. There is a pot luck lunch at 12, and everybody brings  something. I willpost some pics from the  meet , and  George I took a bunch of pics  of kennys IC side door caboose, for you to get ideas from. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 10th, 2007, 2:08pm
unloading the raritan.   She was fired up for  7 hours
Posted by: Texas_Steam Posted on: Jun 10th, 2007, 2:12pm
Ray, that is a Suh-WEET! electric engine lift... home built or available retail?  Necessity is the motherhood of invention, for sure.
 
Mark
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 10th, 2007, 2:13pm
filling the boiler.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 10th, 2007, 2:16pm
fire on the grates
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 10th, 2007, 2:19pm
polishing the rails
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 10th, 2007, 2:24pm
Tom running Eric's  pennsy 10 wheeler, I think this  is a G-5. 3/4 inch scale.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 10th, 2007, 2:30pm
This pic has a sister engine to Andrews  mogul coming into the passenger station, and  in the truck is a 12 inch gauge  mogul we built , they are hoping to run it in a few weeks.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 10th, 2007, 2:33pm
Jim Adams running the sw-9
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 10th, 2007, 2:37pm
Jim entering the tunnel. Mark the lift is home made and works ery good
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 10th, 2007, 2:42pm
Jim heading across the creek.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 10th, 2007, 2:46pm
George I hope to have one like this riding behind my mike some day. hint hint
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 10th, 2007, 2:50pm
end view
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Jun 10th, 2007, 8:41pm
hey ray!
 
you just keep an eye on the moose thread!
 
moose the caboose
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 10th, 2007, 9:22pm
OK George, I will sleep with one eye open. LOL.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Jun 11th, 2007, 1:31pm

 
   Well, Ray, it certainly looks like you all were have quite a time. Good to see smoke from the Raritan stack again. Hope you did'nt break any land speed records again.
He,he,he.
 
   Can't wait to have you climb up and OVER the trestle.
 
   Take care,  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Jun 12th, 2007, 3:44pm
SteamHeaton's Raritan
 
« on: May 27th, 2007, 7:59pm » Quick-Jump   Reply w/Quote   Modify   Remove  
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I've known SteamHeaton since we were both about 8 years old & this engine since around 15 years old...  
 
Back then, we didn't know how to handle the overpressure & would whack the relief valve with a wrench or screwdriver; oh, the things kids do & the things that are able to survive our lunacy.  
 
It's nice to see that rig again... lots of memories there.  
 
Mark  
 
 
moved by moderator
Posted by: C_S22 Posted on: Jun 12th, 2007, 11:29pm
Ray,
 
I can't believe your skill with the torch.
 
I cant thank you enough for your idea of modifying 5 dollar brass valves for my locomotive manifold.
 
At this rate the cab for the C&S 22 will be done AFTER you are steaming down the track......
 
Cam
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 13th, 2007, 9:42am
Hello, Cam
 Glad  you enjoyed the torch pic's.  The guide tool realy makes it easy to make nice cuts.  As  for the vavles,  that is just another example ,of people sharing ideas.  Glad I was able to help.  The valves on the raritan have been on there for 15 years.  Ray III
Posted by: dgmarklin Posted on: Jun 14th, 2007, 9:06am
Hey Cam,  
Dont know where really else where to put this, I saw your engine running at the BCRR, Very nice work done to your locomotive, it was running really good the day we were TRYING to run the GP-38 and kept holding up the line!  
 
Nice work Ray, Very nice engines, Can you set a land record up a 1.7% grade, or that a little too crazy, lol
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Jun 17th, 2007, 12:54am

 
   Sorry I did'nt jump in here sooner. Ray, just hold your horses. My Erie caboose is first, yuk,yuk,yuk.
 
   And as others have already stated, yea that is some nice torch work. Now its time to turn the welder on, ya think! Remember, next February is just around the corner.  
According to D. Herring.
 
   Take care,  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: Texas_Steam Posted on: Jun 19th, 2007, 3:15am
Ray (or anyone else who responds first),
 
Where is this Feb. meet going to happen?  After all the time spent working on this engine, I may try to steal some time & come see it in action.  It's been... what, 18+ years since my last visit to an "official" meet (as opposed to the N. Broward park with weekend runs).
 
Mark
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 19th, 2007, 9:48am
Mark, the next meet in Feb that we are referring to is in s.w. florida.  Ft Myers to be exact.  Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 19th, 2007, 9:50am
Oh and one more thing Mark , the one thing this meet is not , is official. This is an un-meet. Ray III
Posted by: dgmarklin Posted on: Jun 20th, 2007, 2:37am
I would LOVE to have the dates for it...  
 
Is this going to be a coal shoveler meet or are electric's invited to have a couple of rounds,  
 
lol
 
DG
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: Jun 20th, 2007, 1:14pm
Dean, Ray is referring to the "Steam Only" invitational unmeet.  
 
Definately no lawn mowers of battery boxes allowed at this function. I don't think we'd have the room for them anyway, we pretty much max out with top of the line Live Steam Engines, and Live Steamers.  
 
Ray, I have your steaming bay done, it has room enough for your Mike and Rariton!
Posted by: Slipped_Eccentric Posted on: Jun 20th, 2007, 6:54pm
Ray, Cam, would either one of you describe what valves you are using?
Posted by: C_S22 Posted on: Jun 21st, 2007, 12:14am
Hey Justin
 
The valves are $5 brass valves bought at a hardware store (I get mine at Lowes as Ace is futher away). The are needle angle valves that are 1/8 NPT x 1/4" Compression. What I did was a little different than Ray.  
 
I cut off the SS valve handles with a grinder. I then stuck the brass valve stem in a special collet I have. The collet holder was chucked in the lathe and the stem was faced off until the remaining SS handle hole is removed (they are pressed into the brass valve stem). A 1/4" deep hole is drilled and tapped 6-32. I loctited a SS set screw in the threaded hole.
 
After the operations on the stem were made handles were machined. They were made from 1" brass round. They had 6, 1/8" holes at 60 degrees drilled in them on a .25 inch radius and a 1/4" wide x 1/16" deep recess milled around the hole circle. Then the center was drilled and tapped 6-32 and the outer diameter knurled.
 
After all machining operations, the handle is screwed on the SS set screw loctited in the stem and a locknut installed.
 
Sorry this was so long and it may be confusing. If you look in Bruce's thread on the C&S 22, you can kinda see the handles.
 
If you want a picture of the valve assembly, I'll be happy to do it as I just made one two days ago! Just let me know on the board.
 
Posted by: Slipped_Eccentric Posted on: Jun 25th, 2007, 10:04pm
Thanks Cam.  I'm pretty sure I know what you're talking about (I think I even bought some at one point to do the same for).  Did you need to change out the o-ring to hold up to steam temperatures?  By all means post up a pic.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 27th, 2007, 12:27am
Justin
 Cam has taken my idea ,and put a very nice spin on it . great idea cam, I bet they look great. The next few pics are of the valve I used and a quick explanation of the simple change over of the  SS handle to a knob. These are  regular  elec. cabinet knobs from  , yep you guessed it ace hardware. They are a small  piece of brass that has been knurled and threaded. The first step is to remove the stainless steel pin [hande], a few taps  with a hammer should do. Then drill the knob  out to fit over the brass valve stem. This will be where the threads are, but you will not need them, the threads that is. After you have the knob where it will  fit over the  valve stem, slide it on so that it is flush with the end of the stem.  Now drill through the  groove in the side of the  brass knob and continue drilling  through the vale stem , this hole should be a little smaller than the  stainless steel  pin that you removed. Cut the pin and use the middle  portion of it, this part  is knurled and will  hold the  knob on. Cut the pin just as long as the knob is wide and tap it in. Hope this helps. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 27th, 2007, 12:30am
valve and knob
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 27th, 2007, 12:36am
I know the pics are a little blurry, the first pic shows you the  groove , on the side of the knob, and this second pic shows you ,where the knob will slide on ,after drilling it out. you can also see the pin you will remove and later, cut down and reuse to hold knob on.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 27th, 2007, 12:42am
I said drill all the way through the stem, but actually, you drill through the knob then line  up that hole you just made in the knob with the existing hole from the pin, that you removed. Hope I did not confuse you .
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 27th, 2007, 12:47am
In this pic you can see the finished product. these are the  original valves that I made for the raritan ,back in 1992.  They are still on the loco today. Ray III
Posted by: Alcosteam Posted on: Jun 27th, 2007, 8:56pm
Ray I forgot to tell you saturday that I have your gas can.    You also missed a great final run 18 cars unassisted to the wye and back.  
 
tim
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 28th, 2007, 8:36am
Tim
Yes I knew you had the gas can, but I could not take it with me in the car, thanks. I will get it ,next time I come up.  wow 18 cars , i bet that sounded great. I am going to post some pics on here from sat. Thanks Ray
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 28th, 2007, 8:52am
Here is the engine Tim is referring to. This is a 12 inch gauge mogul, that a group of guys ,all very good friends of mine have been working on for at least 12 years. When I first met  these guys back in 1996, they were  about  3/4 of the way done with the tender, I became there second welder . Every Saturday they meet and work in there machine shop, which back then was at one of the guys home. Now they  have all of there machines in an old grocery store ,a small one but much larger than the garage they were in.  You can work on your stuff,  or help some one else or get help from one of the more exp guys in the group. In addition to all of the 3/4|", 1",and 1 1/2" projects, they were also  working on this 12" mogul. I lived near them for  2 years and was in the shop almost every sat night  , until I moved about  2 1/2 hours south. Now I don't get up there very much. I sure miss those sat nights.  When they bought this engine all they had  I believe was the  engine frame , pilot wheels,drivers ,and cylinders. Everthing else was fabricated.So here are some pics of this engine strutting her stuff last sat at the WF&P in Glencoe  Missouri. We started off with 4 gondolas, and she would not even bark. So they  added 10 more cars, and it sounded great. Tim tells me they went to 18 after I left. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 28th, 2007, 8:57am
this pic will give you an idea ,how big this engine is.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 28th, 2007, 9:01am
here is a cab shot
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 28th, 2007, 9:11am
Here is a pic of the mogul with just 4 cars. On her last run Tim tells me they had 18. I rode on the last car  on the 14 car train. this is a point to point RR. So at the other end they cut the train off and turn the engine on a wye. So now for the return trip I was  right behind the tender. I videoed the whole trip, maybe I will try to post some of that tape.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 28th, 2007, 9:21am
Back to the boiler project. Now that I have all of my plates cut out , it's time to start drilling all of the holes. There will be 52 staybolts, and 21 tubes. so thats 104 staybolt holes , and 42 tube holes. My templates already have the staybolts layed out , so I just lay the template down, clamp it to the plate and  put the punch on each mark and give it a whack with a hammer. this first pic is the template on one of the side sheets after I have just  finished marking all of the stays.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 28th, 2007, 9:25am
marking the plates
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 28th, 2007, 9:29am
drilling the holes on one of the out side sheets. i hope to have all of the staybolt holes done in a day or two. Ray III
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Jun 28th, 2007, 1:41pm
on Jun 27th, 2007, 8:56pm, Alcosteam wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Ray I forgot to tell you saturday that I have your gas can.    You also missed a great final run 18 cars unassisted to the wye and back.  
 
tim

 
   HOLY MACKERAL !!!  that is not only big,,,,,its beautiful. Tim, you guys should be really proud. by the pics from ray, you guys earned it.
 
   take carw,
 
   bruce
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 28th, 2007, 1:46pm
here are all of the plates , they are drilled  to 3/8ths and waiting for the countersink to arrive , so I can countersink the holes . That will give me more area to weld the staybolt to the plate
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 28th, 2007, 1:52pm
Here is the mike patiently waiting for her boiler, and old faithful is in the background. The smokebox is just sitting on there, that will get tackled after the boiler is done. Ray III
Posted by: Alcosteam Posted on: Jun 28th, 2007, 6:32pm
It took bunching up the slack and alittle sand to get the train moving out of Glencoe but once underway it was no trouble to keep 18 cars moving.  Only one slight wheel slip on wet rail between Bluffs and Mohan.  There were some complaints about the amount of hot cinders and such that came blasting out the stack.  
 
We will have to plan on getting back down to Glencoe maybe even acouple more times this year.   I know there are others in the group that would like to run the engine.  
 
tim
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Jun 29th, 2007, 11:39am

 
   ray,
 
   those side sheets look great. man, i personally would not stand between you and the welder wirhin the next week or so. heh,heh, heh. i'd get run over.
 
   tim,
 
   again, that is an awesome accomplishment. i sure would love to see that engine in person.  
 
   take care,  
 
   bruce
Posted by: Texas_Steam Posted on: Jun 30th, 2007, 2:15am
Ray, good photos there of the 12"er.  With all 18 cars loaded, can anyone guess what kind of weight (total of cars & passengers) that might be?
 
Is that Deb or Britt behind the camera for your photos?  & I could be wrong, but your drill press almost looks like the one we used to use @ Ray Sr.'s carport...
Posted by: Alcosteam Posted on: Jun 30th, 2007, 6:59am
 I am hoping that some of the video shot of the 18 car run will allow a count on the amount of people riding the train.  I do know that when I left Glencoe there were four empty cars.  There were people that wanted to video the train as I left Glencoe and thought the train would be going slow enough they could hop on as I went by but once underway and making the slight hill out of Glencoe I was not going to slow down.  
  At one time I was told the cars average around 800 lbs apiece which would make the cars alone 14400 lbs.   Add to that a tender full of water and you add another 1200 lbs.  Looking at pictures of the train sitting at Glencoe I can count around 35 people but there could be more and kids sitting behind an adult are hard to see.  I don't know what the average adult weighs but at 185 lbs each that is 6485 lbs.  That is a fairly conservative weight of just over 22000 lbs or 11 tons.  
  The engine at operating weight is nearing 3000 lbs not including tender.  The engine was built using the drivers and cylinders from a scrapped House of David  4-6-0 which of course were originally 15" guage.  A new frame was made and the pilot wheels are from an old Tom Thumb train which was 15" guage as well.  The boiler is 16"  SA-53B  seamless tube that I bought at an auction along with two pieces of 10" tube one of which is going to become Rays Mikado boiler.  Pretty much everything else has been fabricated.  
 Here is another picture of the engine just unloaded onto the passenger turntable at Glencoe.  There is still work to do on the engine to finish it up so until the next run it will go back into the shop.  
 
tim
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Jun 30th, 2007, 10:06am
hey tim,
 
this grand scale railroad deserves its own thread.  while the size is generally considered beyond the scope of this particular live steam board, i don't know of any others here on railfan.  having said that, at the moment we are the best fit.  why not start a thread in the name of this railroad so that it can be highlighted for its accomplishments and techniques of problem solving?
 
just a thought...
 
moose the caboose
 
 
on Jun 30th, 2007, 6:59am, Alcosteam wrote:       (Click here for original message)
 I am hoping that some of the video shot of the 18 car run will allow a count on the amount of people riding the train.  I do know that when I left Glencoe there were four empty cars.  There were people that wanted to video the train as I left Glencoe and thought the train would be going slow enough they could hop on as I went by but once underway and making the slight hill out of Glencoe I was not going to slow down.  
  At one time I was told the cars average around 800 lbs apiece which would make the cars alone 14400 lbs.   Add to that a tender full of water and you add another 1200 lbs.  Looking at pictures of the train sitting at Glencoe I can count around 35 people but there could be more and kids sitting behind an adult are hard to see.  I don't know what the average adult weighs but at 185 lbs each that is 6485 lbs.  That is a fairly conservative weight of just over 22000 lbs or 11 tons.  
  The engine at operating weight is nearing 3000 lbs not including tender.  The engine was built using the drivers and cylinders from a scrapped House of David  4-6-0 which of course were originally 15" guage.  A new frame was made and the pilot wheels are from an old Tom Thumb train which was 15" guage as well.  The boiler is 16"  SA-53B  seamless tube that I bought at an auction along with two pieces of 10" tube one of which is going to become Rays Mikado boiler.  Pretty much everything else has been fabricated.  
 Here is another picture of the engine just unloaded onto the passenger turntable at Glencoe.  There is still work to do on the engine to finish it up so until the next run it will go back into the shop.  
 
tim

Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 2nd, 2007, 7:34pm
Mark, yes this is the same drill press from back then.  
Well I picked up the material for the staybolts and the  mudring today. The stays are  3/8ths, and the mudring will be 3/4, all of it is hot rolled. The countersink I ordered also arrived today, and I hope to have them all countersunk by this evening. I needed a  31/32 drill bit  for the tube holes and did not have one so it is ordered,will be here  by fri. I hope to get the tube nest drilled and reamed  this weekend. Then I will start beveling the plates and start welding. Here is a pic of the first  few holes meeting the countersink.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 4th, 2007, 6:35am
here is a pic of the outside firebox sheet with all of the  staybolt holes drilled and countersunk.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 4th, 2007, 6:43am
Here is a pic of a staybolt ,  once it has been welded  to the sheet  the countersunk area will be filled in with weld.  I put one in the plate just to show you what it will look like. I am a little ways from welding staybolts.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 27th, 2007, 10:23pm
I am working on the boiler again.  All of the rain in AR. and TX. a couple of weeks ago ,forced  2 railroads to detour on us.  Work and sleep was all I did for over  2weeks.  a cond  from one of those railroads showed us a pic of a locomotive with water up to the bottom of the cab door.  Well the water has receded and I again have some spare time. I tack welded the  front and rear tube sheet together , and drilled the 21 pilot holes.  I then needed to drill them with a 31/32 bit ,and ream to 1", but my drill press will not run slow enough for that large bit.  I will have to use a machine shop for this  part.  After I get this done , the welding can begin. This pic shows the  2 plates together getting the pilot holes.  Ray III
Posted by: dgmarklin Posted on: Jul 28th, 2007, 12:06am
Ray,
 
That makes me want to go out to the garage...(yes even here at 12:05 AM) and start making an steam engine!
 
If I only had a drill press....(hint: MOM! I WANT ONE!)  
 
BTW:  Since I'm back to Bradenton now, I need to get some good pictures of my GE 44, never have got any good pictures of it done now that I think of it!
Posted by: Texas_Steam Posted on: Jul 28th, 2007, 12:21am
Ray, you think it's hard for you getting all the work - down here in Austin, we've already surpassed our rain average for the year with only minor chances of a letup.  We have yet to surpass 95* however the humidity is making me feel like I'm back in Fort Lauderdale again.  Drat!  I thought I'd left that behind!!!
 
For all the others, please know that It's especially difficult for me since I'm a roofing contractor & I'm having to push back job after job after job - but the calls are still coming in.  <sigh>
 
Glad to see you're back to making progress of some sort.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Jul 30th, 2007, 4:35pm

 
   Ray,
 
   Man it is so good to see the work that you are doing on that boiler. GIT that welder cranked up friend. I personally can't wait to see that thing come together through you photos. I certainly hope others find it as interesting as I do.  
 
   Please give us some description of the process as you go along with this major peoject. I'm sure that would help others that might contemplate this same building project on their own steamer.
 
   talk to you soon, take care,  
 
   Bruce
 
   ps
   sling (immobilizer) is off of my arm, finally
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Aug 1st, 2007, 4:53pm
That's looking really great, Ray. Not to apply any pressure, but it sure would be a treat to see her running at the 08 unmeet
 
Greg B.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 7th, 2007, 9:48pm
Hello all, I stopped by the machine shop in town today and picked up my flue sheets that were ,getting the tube holes drilled and reamed.  i had them tack welded together so both holes were  lined up.  Now I will separate the  2 sheets and  take the rear  tube sheet back to the same shop and  have them bend the bottom of it back slightly, to match the rake back of the  fire box side sheet.  Then I get to flip the switch on the tig welder and start  putting this together so Greg can see it run at the un-meet.  I have alot to do but i still think it is poss to have it running  for the meet. I will post a few pics of the tube holes drilled and reamed.  Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 7th, 2007, 9:57pm
front and rear tube sheet  still tacked together with the holes drilled and reamed
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 7th, 2007, 10:02pm
this view shows you where the tube nest will be.  21, 1" tubes
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Aug 7th, 2007, 10:43pm
Absolutely awsome, Ray. Unless life trips you up, there's no doubt that you will make it.
 
I'm a little ways behind you. I get to buy a cement mixer, later this month, to pour the foundation, to build my shop etc, etc..... Right now, all of the equipment is in the guest (Moose's) room. The lathe and welder look funny sitting next to the night stand and dresser! I swear I'm gonna write a book!!
 
Good luck, Ray,
Greg B.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Aug 8th, 2007, 2:57pm

 
   Terrific, just terrific !! That is going to be a brute of a locomotive. I can't wait till you get back down here with it.
 
   take care,  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Aug 8th, 2007, 3:16pm
Ray,
I see where you plan to use 1" tubes.  If you need some steel tubes for this project, I have some available, and they are yours for the cost of shipping.  Just tell me how long they need to be.
Dan Watson
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 8th, 2007, 11:29pm
Thanks Greg, and Bruce.  Your support helps keep me going.  It is tough working on a project like this all by yourself , hard to stay motivated sometimes.  Dan thankyou for the tube offer, I truly appreciate the offer.  I will be using copper tubes.  Ray III
Posted by: C_S22 Posted on: Aug 9th, 2007, 11:44am
Ray
 
Your project is truly inspiring. This is really making me want to "officially" learn welding.
 
The mike is looking great and I hope to see it in February. What a big shift from the Raritan! Probably should take it a little slow at first, got a lot more engine there......
 
Cam
Posted by: Alcosteam Posted on: Aug 13th, 2007, 12:06am
Hey Ray   When you get ready to roll your tubes in let me know and I will let you borrow a tube roller.  I think you are using the same size tubes as #7 ?   1" ID  and 1.125 OD ?  Or better yet bring your boiler and tubes up and we can roll the tubes and then hydro in one shot.  
 
Did you get to watch the DVD yet?  Depending on if I can get off of work or not we plan on going down to the WF&P again on the Grand Scales pre-convention day which is the 13th of Sept.  Surely the CN won't suspect anything if you play hooky in the middle of the week...  
 
tim
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 13th, 2007, 10:27pm
Hello all, Thanks Cam I appreciate that.  Tim I did  watch the dvd, that was great. Thanks .  I will make a copy of my vid and get it to you this week I am on vacation all week. I spent alot of time in the garage welding the tube sheet back together and checking the fit of the other parts  .  I cut pieces of threaded rod and used nuts and washers to hold the plates at the proper position to check the alignment of everything .  it all fit pretty good ,some plates will need a little grinding , and then I will grind all the bevels for the weld joints.  I hope to start welding the firebox tomorrow.  I will post some pics of my progress today.   Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 13th, 2007, 10:37pm
here is a pic of the tube sheet, clamped down at the proper angle and beveled .
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 13th, 2007, 10:42pm
here is a pic of the first pass , First I made 4 good tack welds and then started running my first pass
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 13th, 2007, 10:46pm
this pic shows the final pass on this side,after it cooled for awhile I flipped it over and ran one pass for a sealing run.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 13th, 2007, 10:51pm
this pic shows the firebox together , notice the threaded rod I am using to hold everything in it's proper position. this is a dry run to check the fit , now i will take it back apart and bevel all the edges  for welding, then  used the treaded rod again to hold at proper position during the welding .
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 13th, 2007, 10:54pm
another pic of the firebox with threaded rob
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Aug 13th, 2007, 10:55pm

 
   Good night nurse!! That is some heavy stuff there. And i see that your "gigundo" welder is doing a nice job. WOW, I can't believe how heavy that boiler is going to be.  
   BTW, Ray. take alook at my last post in the coal quest thread. I think you will remember this incident with Ben. Only you could tell the accurate story of the "Miami" coal.
 
   Take care, good welding,
 
   Bruce
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 13th, 2007, 10:59pm
this pic shows the rear tube sheet angle pretty good
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 13th, 2007, 11:04pm
I also put some treaded rod  in the outside sheets to see how they were going to fit. this thing is starting to get heavy
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 13th, 2007, 11:08pm
this pic shows the backhead  end ,notice how the throat sheet is not fitting quite right. That will need a little grinding tomorrow.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 13th, 2007, 11:12pm
thanks Bruce, yes the welder is wonderful. this is the last pic for tonight, I forgot to take one with the crown sheet in place.  goodnight all Ray III
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Aug 13th, 2007, 11:39pm
What can be said? You must be very careful, Ray, or you'll wake up some morning and find a nother lokey in the garage! I'm an old rock'n'roller, but you're makin' me like heavy metal
 
Greg B.
Posted by: Texas_Steam Posted on: Aug 14th, 2007, 3:02am
Are you sure you're building to the right scale??
 
That last photo really shows how large this puppy is going to be.  Very impressive... this really is the build you always wanted to do, right?
 
PS: You need more stuff in your garage.  I think I see an available 2" x 3" patch up near the ceiling.
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: Aug 14th, 2007, 7:09am
Wow Ray, that is very impressive work! You might need to add some helper springs to your train transport trailer for this puppy.  Thanks for sharing your progress with the rest of us "envious", "drooling", "wishing we could build one like that too" members.
Posted by: Slipped_Eccentric Posted on: Aug 15th, 2007, 12:41am
Looking real good Ray!  I don't think that I saw it mentioned earlier but what weld process are you using?  TIG?
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 15th, 2007, 12:45pm
Hello all,   Thanks Greg ,Mark, Bobby ,and Justin.    Well Greg these  parts needs to turn into a lokey by Feb or I'll catch hell for sure.  Mark  this is  deff the engine I always wanted and never thought I would own.  Bobby  I am glad you are enjoying the updates, it has been fun explaining my way through this. Justin , yes i am welding this boiler with tig. This is my first boiler using  tig, all of the others were stick welded including the raritan. By the way, the raritan is 28 this year and the boiler  on it is 16.    Ray III
Posted by: 765 fan Posted on: Aug 15th, 2007, 1:57pm
on Aug 13th, 2007, 10:51pm, SteamHeaton wrote:       (Click here for original message)
this pic shows the firebox together , notice the threaded rod I am using to hold everything in it's proper position. this is a dry run to check the fit , now i will take it back apart and bevel all the edges  for welding, then  used the treaded rod again to hold at proper position during the welding .
Pretty soon that firebox will be ''hot''!
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 26th, 2007, 10:30pm
My pace has slowed down a little, here lately due to the domestic stuff getting in the way or taking  priority, LOL however you want to look at it.  I have been working on the boiler, last week I  beveled all of the firebox plates, then reinstalled the threaded rods to hold the plates  .  tonight  8/26 I made my first  weld pass  around the firebox.  After I made 16 spot welds to hold it , I began to weld.  The first pass was burned in pretty hot , with good penetration.  This is the  part of the project I have been looking forward to.  I will post  some pics of progress to date. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 26th, 2007, 10:38pm
beveling a side sheet, last week.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 26th, 2007, 10:44pm
firebox plates together , using threaded rod and a clamp to hold in place , this is just befor I started  to spot weld the corners.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 26th, 2007, 10:48pm
spot welding ,so it won't pull when I start to weld.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 26th, 2007, 10:52pm
this pic shows the spot welds, 3 on each outside corner, and 2 on the inside corners.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 26th, 2007, 11:02pm
this is the first pass on the firebox.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 26th, 2007, 11:06pm
this pic shows the  first pass on the front and back of the side sheet
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 26th, 2007, 11:10pm
another angle on the last pic, showing the first 2 welds
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 26th, 2007, 11:14pm
a close up of first pass.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 26th, 2007, 11:21pm
last pic for tonight, this pic shows first pass ,the next several passes will fill the beveled area. Then I will make 1 pass on the inside of the firebox for a sealing run.
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Aug 27th, 2007, 8:53am
Thanks, so much, for the update, Ray. It's great fun, as well as educational, to watch your progress. What filler rod are you using?
 
Greg B.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Aug 27th, 2007, 9:44am

 
   Ray,
 
   Those look like some really hot welds. Nice flow to them. If you keep going like this, it won't be long till all the heavy plate welding is done.
   Thanks for posting these pics.
 
   Take care,
 
   Bruce
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: Aug 27th, 2007, 5:27pm
Ray, I can tell you live in "Big Coal" country....... That is one big firebox!
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 30th, 2007, 11:30am
Thanks Greg, Bruce, and Bobby.   Greg  I am using  ER70s-2   1/8th rod .  Bruce yes the root pass went in pretty hot, with good penetration.  Bobby,  you are correct.  This is a huge firebox. 14 1/4 x 9 3/4.   The raritan's firebox  is only 4x6.  This will be a totally diff  ballgame firing this one.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 2nd, 2007, 6:31pm
here is a pic of my makeshift  welding table.  the firebox is almost done. A few more pass's on the crown, and attach the mudring and fire door ring material.  Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 2nd, 2007, 6:50pm
this pic shows the crown sheet  attached with the first weld pass on the crown to the rear tube sheet.  The  tigwelder I bought for this project is  heavy duty able to weld above 300amps.  this has presented a prob,  the 50 amp breaker that has done fine over the years for my little lincoln buzz box is not liking the  potential 100 amp draw of the  tig welder.  when I started to weld the crown the other day the breaker started tripping.  So an electrician will upgrade the  elec. to the garage on tuesday.  
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 2nd, 2007, 6:56pm
A back view of the firebox with crown attached
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 2nd, 2007, 7:00pm
here is a close up of some of the welds
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 2nd, 2007, 7:05pm
on the right side you can see the bevel between the crown and side sheet.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 2nd, 2007, 7:15pm
this pic shows the firebox on it's side with welds on all of the plates
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 2nd, 2007, 7:21pm
this is the last pic for today, it shows the inside of the firebox with some of the seal welds  already run, this is just extra weld that  seals all the joints from the inside , a little insurance if you will, that  I hope to never need. I will not do anymore welding until tuesday, and the 100 amp breaker is  installed with heavier wire too.  This will need a lot of coal.  Ray III
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Sep 2nd, 2007, 9:58pm

 
   HOLY HANNA, Ray,  that is one hell-of-a big firebox. You goota git yoself on hell-of-a big coal scoop now. Heh,heh,heh.
 
   Take care,
 
   Bruce
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: Sep 3rd, 2007, 5:38pm
I'm thinkin we may be seeing the first 1.5" scale "stoker"  to feed this monster. Ray it sure is shaping up nicely.
Posted by: Slipped_Eccentric Posted on: Sep 4th, 2007, 8:05pm
Great looking welds Ray!  I love the picture of the firebox in front of the raritan, really shows how much bigger the mike is going to be.
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Sep 5th, 2007, 6:21am
I was just reminiscing about being young and having enough unruptured discs to be able to horse that much steel around.
 
Lookin' real good, Ray.
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: Sep 5th, 2007, 4:01pm
Greg, for a minute I thought you said "when I was young I used to steal horses"  
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Sep 5th, 2007, 6:02pm
The punch line to an old horse joke is, "That's one..."
 
Well, Bobby, that's one.... They were iron horses, by the way.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 5th, 2007, 8:28pm
LOL,  actually I should have welded a crane together first.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 5th, 2007, 8:31pm
The firebox is done, well except for  the mud ring and fire door  ring material.  I was not bothered by the railroad, and was able to weld all day.  This next set of pics  shows the fire box comlpeted , with the girders on top, which take the place of  staybolts that would have gone from the crown to the boiler shell above.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 5th, 2007, 8:52pm
firebox complete
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 5th, 2007, 8:55pm
this next pic shows a 12 inch rule next to the firebox
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 5th, 2007, 9:14pm
the girders are  1/2" thick x 2" tall x 14 3/4 long
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 5th, 2007, 9:24pm
top view of the firebox,  I could not believe this after adding it  up,  there is  566 inches of weld in this firebox.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 5th, 2007, 9:26pm
another pic with  the 12" rule, vertical this time.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Sep 7th, 2007, 10:17am

 
   Man, that is looking pretty "husky". You just might need a crane to lift the damn thing. If you keep going like this, I'm fairly sure you'll be running the Mike at the Un-meet 08.
 
   Take care,  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Sep 7th, 2007, 11:48am
Bruce,
Better get your resident mason to build a brick steaming bay.....
 
Greg B.
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: Sep 7th, 2007, 2:03pm
I think we need to check the lift capacity of the transfer table!    
 
Not to mention that the tall trestle may not be so tall after Ray's first run. LOL
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 30th, 2007, 10:24pm
Hello everyone, The pace of the boiler construction has slowed a bit  lately, due to the  12 inch to the foot  railroad. Tonight I finally  finished grinding the firedoor ring material, and welded the four pieces together. Tomorrow I should have this ring welded to the firebox .
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 30th, 2007, 10:32pm
here is a pic of the firedoor ring material clamped and ready to be welded together. there are four pieces here. 3/4 inch bar stock , hot rolled. This  ring sits between the firebox and the backhead. Both sides of the bar stock were ground , to provide a  good taper for max weld  penetration.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 30th, 2007, 10:35pm
this pic shows the first pass  on all four corners.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 30th, 2007, 10:45pm
one more pic of the barstock.  I will weld / buildup  higher than the material, so I can grind it back down flush, for a nice fit on the backhead.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 30th, 2007, 10:53pm
earlier this week I put thefirebox on the frame to check the fit  of all the plates.  I  put a few staybolts in to see how everything lined up.  also to check the fit of the mudring material , befor I welded it on.  all of the outside plates lined up pretty good.  after i get the mudring and firedoor ring welded to the  firebox , I will start welding the outside sheets to the boiler barrel. once that is done the firebox will get positioned  inbetween the outside sheets and  the mudring will be welded to the outside sheet.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 30th, 2007, 10:59pm
this is a good pic of the water leg  inbetween the firebox and outside sheet.  You can see the  staybolts I have  just set in to check the alignment of the sheets. this is the part of the boiler most people do not get to see.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 30th, 2007, 11:07pm
another view of the  firebox mock-up.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 30th, 2007, 11:12pm
the backhead with a few staybolts  in .
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 30th, 2007, 11:18pm
looking through the smokebox.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 30th, 2007, 11:34pm
While I was at the machine / fab shop near my home , buying the  material for the girders.  The owner of the shop told me he had just  purchased a  CNC plasma torch.  I asked him  what was the rate  for  cutting  material .  He  said that they were still  learning and  were looking for projects to  help figure out set up times and  job times.   He said it would be  a very  good rate  while they were learning.  The gears started turning in my head.  I planned on making  about a dozen 50 ton offset hoppers to go  behind the auxiliary tender, but certainly not now. The boiler is eating up what ever spare time I can find.  I decided to let him  build a hopper with the new torch.  He will cut out the sides, end and bottom.  he will also bend the sheets for me.  he is unable to do a compound bend so the side sheet will be 3 pieces, we will mig weld them back together and grind flush.  this pic was taken from  the book IC/ GM&O  color guide to frieght and pass equipment. By James Kinkaid.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 30th, 2007, 11:44pm
As amazing as it might seem,  the terminal where I go on duty  , has one of these hoppers.  It is a 2 bay 50 ton offset hopper , from the late 30's.   Later on they  made  3 bay  70 ton hoppers .  This hopper was converted to a locomotive sand car and was fitted with a roof to keep the sand dry, but all the rest of it is  original. I climbed all over this thing  one day before work to get  measurements .  They no longer service engines at  my terminal and the frog for the track this hopper is on has been removed , so it will be there until it gets cut up. What a lucky break to  have this car for  details.  So I scaled  it down and drew it out on a poster board actually  2 taped together  and took it to the fab shop.  
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 30th, 2007, 11:48pm
This is acomplicated car to build due to the fact that the top edge angles in  1/2 inch, the ends  angle in 1/2 inch, and the end of the car  angles up 3/8ths of an inch. the ends are   made that way that is not the result of a wreck.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 30th, 2007, 11:53pm
Last friday I received a call from the fab shop , they said if I wanted to see the first side  being cut to come  over.  I went right over.   It was amazing , this torch cut  one side of the car out in 59 seconds.  The next day they bent the side and hemed the edge like  Bill Koster  used to do on his cars.  This is a pic of the first side  bent .  We still need to make the  other side  pieces and weld themto this  piece.  
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 30th, 2007, 11:56pm
end view of side sheet
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 1st, 2007, 12:07am
this is the  to scale drawing I made for the fab shop. it will be  50 inches long , and made  of  16 gauge  sheet metal.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Oct 1st, 2007, 3:02pm

 
   Ray,  
 
   That is some nice work. If you can only keep up this kind of pace, we sure will see her running at the un-meet in Feb. Keep that welder hot!!
 
   thanks for the interesting and informative pics and description.
 
   Bruce
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: Oct 1st, 2007, 6:16pm
Ray, that boiler is coming along nicely. But..........looking at all that steel.........I am beginning to think we should forget a brick steaming bay and go straight to a steel reinforced concrete one!
 
Bobby
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Oct 1st, 2007, 10:21pm
That's gonna be a nice hopper, Ray.
 
re boiler; I wanna put a dial indicator on the bridge stringers!!
 
Greg B.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 3rd, 2007, 7:10pm
Thanks  Bruce , Bobby , and Greg.   I finally welded the firedoor ring on today,  now I have to grind the mud ring and weld it on, I'm not looking forward to the grinding part, but  thinking about shoveling coal into it  makes it all worth while. I hope to get the mud ring on in the next couple of days .  Then the boiler will start taking shape as the outside sheets go on.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 3rd, 2007, 7:12pm
close up of fire door ring
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 3rd, 2007, 7:15pm
firebox, with firedoor ring welded on
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Oct 3rd, 2007, 7:47pm
hey ray!
 
great work!  i like the hopper project and want to see more about it...who knows, maybe one day i'll look back and decide that i can do it too!   how about creating a thread just about it?
 
btw, your boiler-work is very very nice!  ya know, to keep you in practice, there are 2 fairly large boiler projects that you could work on..oh well, maybe when you're not sooo busy with some of the neatest projects in the hobby!  lololol!
 
seriously, posting your work helps take the mystery out locomotive construction and into the realm of guys like me.  keep up the grand work!
 
moose the caboose
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Oct 4th, 2007, 8:50am

 
   Man, I know that I've said this before, but those are some NICE welds. Can't wait to see that baby rolling down the track. And, maybe you would just let an old coal shoveler have a shot at that fire box.
 
   Great work, thanks for shareing,
 
   Bruce
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Oct 4th, 2007, 3:05pm
hi all,
 
bruce:  if i manage to get him to launch me on the raritan 'rocket' maybe you could sneak out of the yard with that grand mike of his!?  lolol!
 
ray:  i was serious about launching a new thread for the hopper.  i'm doing wooden cars, so that leaves room for someone (that might be you) to show how to do some basic metal-work for more modern railcars.  in the not too distant future, pockets and i will be doing some blended hoppers (metal and wood), but not everyone is into turn-of-the-century railroading like i am.  i understand that metal-work is just like wood-work, but many of us don't understand how to work with the unique properties of the various metals.  i'm lucky, i have you, bruce r, pockets, and several others to fall back on, but many reading these posts are just beginning.  it would be nice to have someone build from start to finish a railcar of simple design that can illustrate and explain the principles of how and why metals are worked with specific techniques.  initially, it would be neat to see how to do it without a shop-full of master tools.  hence, a simple, but functional design!  you're doing great work, keep it coming!
 
i know, shut-up and drive!
 
to all:  what do you think?
 
 
moose the caboose and shay
 
on Oct 4th, 2007, 8:50am, ErieAtlantic7597 wrote:       (Click here for original message)

 
   Man, I know that I've said this before, but those are some NICE welds. Can't wait to see that baby rolling down the track. And, maybe you would just let an old coal shoveler have a shot at that fire box.
 
   Great work, thanks for shareing,
 
   Bruce

Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Oct 19th, 2007, 9:33pm

   Guys,  
 
   This evening, I received a very welcome but all too short phone call from none other than "steamheaton".  
 
   Very quickly he told me he now has the "mud ring" welded into the bottom of the fire box section of his boiler. He hopes to weld in the side sheets tomorrow. He also said that he would post more pics of this very major "project".
 
   BTW, Ray H. (steamheaton) is an engineer for a major railroad in the midwest.
 
   Can't wait to see the pictures,
 
   Bruce  
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 20th, 2007, 5:11pm
Hello everybody. I have been slowly been moving along on the boiler project, even though I have not been  posting pics, I have taken a bunch and will post them as soon as poss. George I would cert be willing to start a thread on the hopper construction, it will have to wait until after the un-meet 08 though.  All spare time  is going to the mike right now.  This first pic is of the mud ring material on my 37 h.p. multi purpose workstation.  It still has the hay spike attached from moving a round bale of hay.  These  pieces of 3/4 inch square stock are  17" and 11" long, that equals to alot of gringing.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 20th, 2007, 5:16pm
another pic of grinding mud ring
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 20th, 2007, 5:22pm
pic of mud ring spot welded on
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 20th, 2007, 5:25pm
pic of mud ring with 1st weld pass, you can also see the seal welds applied to the inside of the fire box.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 20th, 2007, 5:29pm
this pic shows the fire door ring and mud ring
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 20th, 2007, 5:32pm
pic of outside sheets ,with threaded rod to check the fit and  get ready to bevel and attatch them. its starting to look like a boiler now.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 20th, 2007, 5:37pm
pic of fire box next to boiler
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Oct 20th, 2007, 5:37pm
Ray,
When I owned my prototyping business, I paid serious salaries to men, with pockets full of certifications, who could do no better than you..... and they had EVERYTHING to do it with. I tip my hat to you.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 20th, 2007, 5:44pm
Thanks Greg,I appreciate that.  It's a labor of love.  this next pic shows a good angle  and view of the size of this thing.  I cant wait until these  2 pieces are welded together. this is the last for today, the 12inch to the foot  just called and it's off to work, have a good weekend .  I'll post some more when I get back.
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: Oct 20th, 2007, 9:36pm
Beautiful Ray, simply beautiful.  
 
Bobby
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Oct 23rd, 2007, 2:09pm

 
   OMG, that thing is really taking shape. I can already see the coal smoke eminateing
from the stack.  
 
   Ray, for those of us that appreciate the workmanship in this kind of thing, let me use Bobby's words, "just beautifull". I can add nothing more than that.
 
   Take care,  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Oct 23rd, 2007, 8:05pm
hi ray,
 
all i can say is 'ditto'!
 
moose
Posted by: Brian Tusin Posted on: Oct 23rd, 2007, 9:50pm
That is just awsome.  I wish I had the money to be in ride on scale.  I cant wait to see pictures of it when it is done.
Brian
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Oct 24th, 2007, 9:08am
Brian,
We all wish we had the money to be in the ride on scales. Even those of us who are there!!
 
Greg B.
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: Oct 25th, 2007, 7:38am
Ray, you know I have been thinking.....dangerous I know.........that fire box is so large, if you add a rotiserie we can roast a chicken while you run in the morning and cook lunch at the same time!     Just kidding.
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Oct 25th, 2007, 9:27am
ROFLMAO  
 
Greg B.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 31st, 2007, 8:58pm
here is a pic of the barrel and firebox , on the engine stand, getting close to becoming one piece.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 31st, 2007, 9:14pm
this pic shows  the outside sheets bolted on. I did this instead of using threaded rod , I thought this might hold my angle better.  I will put this whole assembly on the barrel, and tack weld while it is all bolted together.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 31st, 2007, 9:21pm
here is a pic, of the  firebox sitting on the barrel, I have some fine tuning to do , on the fit of the 2 parts. a little grinding needs to be done.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 31st, 2007, 9:27pm
this pic shows the  fit of the 2 parts.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 31st, 2007, 9:32pm
firebox with outside sheets bolted on.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 31st, 2007, 9:36pm
looking through fire door
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 31st, 2007, 9:41pm
you are  now inside of the firebox.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 31st, 2007, 9:45pm
another pic of the firedoor opening
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 31st, 2007, 9:51pm
last pic for tonight.
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Oct 31st, 2007, 10:34pm
Only a person who dares to dream and has the fortitude to build those dreams, can understand the significance of that chair. Every true workshop has one. A place for reflection, contemplation and anticipation. From this vantage point can be envisioned projects yet to come. It's also a good place to suck up some suds, before getting out the angle grinder to erase an errant weld..... Ray doesn't appear to have many of those.
 
Thanks for the update, Ray. See you at the Peevo Patio!
 
Greg B.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Nov 1st, 2007, 8:52pm

 
   Ray,
 
   I sure don't know much about the chair, but I do know a thing or two about a boiler. Man, that thing is AWESOME. Have you any idea what the finished product will weigh in at? Looks fairly heavy from here. Please don't leave us hanging here to often. More pics of this major project are always appreciated.
 
   Take care,  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 1st, 2007, 9:39pm
yes Greg that chair is where most of this welding was done, and where a few breaks were  taken to dream about shoveling coal into it. There is still alot of work to be done  , but I still feel completely  confident about finishing  , or at least having it  operable for the  UN-MEET -08.  Bruce  I did weigh all of the parts  the other day. the firebox alone is up to 95 lbs.  The total for all of the parts  is around 315 .
Posted by: dgmarklin Posted on: Nov 1st, 2007, 9:40pm
Sorry, not a steam engine builder by any means...
 
Are you leaving those threaded rods in, or are they going to end up as something else in there....?
 
Thats looking really nice though Ray, I would love to see it run on the tracks.
 
I do want to know how much thats things going to weigh in at!  Didnt those things weigh in at almost 400,000 lbs, so that makes it like 50,000 lbs in 1/8th scale right!?  Just kidding!  
 
Good Luck
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: Nov 2nd, 2007, 7:58am
Dean, Ray's engine may not quite reach 50,000lbs but I think it is a safe bet that traction will not be an issue.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 2nd, 2007, 7:36pm
I went by  the  welding shop, that is building my prototype IC offset  hopper , today.  They are  about 80% done with the  part  they are doing for me .  I will finish the car , along with detail.  This first pic is what I saw today when I walked in there  shop.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 2nd, 2007, 8:03pm
this pic shows the side of the car, minus the top left and right corners , that had to be bent seperately, there were too many bends for one piece.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 2nd, 2007, 8:10pm
For this next pic , we took the car outside in the sunlight for a better  view.  the corner piece is being held in place.  four of these will be made for each car.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 2nd, 2007, 8:18pm
this pic shows the angles on the end of the car. This first car they are  figuring out  things as they go, but are  recording all bends and the  whole car is saved  on a disc for the  cnc plasma torch for the other  cars  in this set I will eventually make. They are also making a jig  to speed up the  build time on the rest of the fleet.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 2nd, 2007, 8:25pm
here you can see the whole car. I can just picture a string of these  behind the auxiliary tender. Back in the day they were  a milk chocolate color.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 2nd, 2007, 8:34pm
this is the last pic of the car. the bottom is flat , for ease  in hauling things, there will be dummy hopper doors underneath.  The main reason i stopped by the shop today was , to drop off my throat sheet  for the boiler.  This is the outside front of the firebox.  I needed to have it bent.
Posted by: Texas_Steam Posted on: Nov 3rd, 2007, 9:46am
RGH, how many of these cars do you expect to have made?  I can easily see you needing a 20' trailer with double racks for moving all of these to a run somewhere.
 
Everything is looking good (especially the firebox & driver photos from a few days ago).
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Nov 3rd, 2007, 6:16pm

 
   WOW, those are gonna be some nice hoppers. A long string of them behind your Mike will be awesome. Thanks for shareing Ray.
 
   Take care,  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Nov 3rd, 2007, 7:33pm
What a great place to store your season's supply of coal....
 
Ray have you made any provision for drainage, in these cars? In spite of our best efforts, we're sometimes a little late with the blue tarps!
 
I like the folded lip on the top edge. That'll stiffen the daylights out of it.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 3rd, 2007, 7:38pm
Hello dgmarklin, the threaded rods are just used during construction . They hold the plates in the position I need them at ,either to weld or just check the fit of everything.  I chose to use bolts  on the firebox instead of the threaded rod this time, the bolts are holding the outside plates  up against the firebox and keeps everything at the proper angle, and the firebox  also is very rigid and nothing will get out of alignment or warp.  the bolts and or threaded rod is removed after the welding is completed.  Then unthreaded 3/8ths rods about  1 1/2 inches long are  put in place , they go through the holes  that you see in the firebox , and then through a matching hole  in the outside sheet, they will stick out of each hole about 1/8th of an inch, this rod is then welded to both plates and keeps them from bowing  while under pressure.  This boiler will have 52 of these which are called staybolts , 52 staybolts with a weld on each end = 104 welds. the welds will be on the outside of the outside sheet , and on the inside of the firebox.
 on Nov 1st, 2007, 9:40pm, dgmarklin wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Sorry, not a steam engine builder by any means...
 
Are you leaving those threaded rods in, or are they going to end up as something else in there....?
 
Thats looking really nice though Ray, I would love to see it run on the tracks.
 
I do want to know how much thats things going to weigh in at!  Didnt those things weigh in at almost 400,000 lbs, so that makes it like 50,000 lbs in 1/8th scale right!?  Just kidding!  
 
Good Luck

Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 4th, 2007, 10:06am
Mark,  I am hoping to one day have 15-20 of these hoppers, and a red I.C. wood side door caboose.  This will take a few years to do.   Bruce thanks , I can see that string of hoppers too. That will be something to see and even better , pull the throttle on.  Greg , I had not thought about drainage,  glad you mentioned that, I will prob do  the same thing  that koster did , a small hole in each corner  in the floor. This has worked pretty good on my 1981 vintage koster hopper.  I was planning on welding a 1/2 angle or channel around the top edge, but the welding shop owner suggested the  folded edge.  You are right about the stiffness. It is very rigid. I am glad he could do that.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 4th, 2007, 10:17am
I have taken a cpl  of days off, for  nothing but boiler work.  I made good progress yesterday, on fitting the firebox to the barrel.  It required  some grinding on the barrel, to get enough clearance for the tube nest, between the bottom row of tubes and the barrel.  I also had my throat sheet at the welding shop, for bending , but  the owner called me and said there was not enough material on the radius side of the bend of the throat sheet, for him to be able to bend it.  He thought it would just distort the plate and  have a bad result.  So I brought it home and cut it last night horizontally along the bend line on the band saw.  Today I will   bevel and set it at the proper angle and weld it back together , the same way I did on the rear tube sheet. I also plan on having the firebox tacked and maybe even some welding done on it today. I will post pics of this weekend boiler extravaganza tonight. LOL   Once the firebox and barrel are one piece, the weight will be  around 270 lbs.  I will start using the tractor  to lift from now on.  |Gentleman  start your welders.
Posted by: Texas_Steam Posted on: Nov 4th, 2007, 11:13am
Quote:
Gentleman  start your welders

 
I got a good laugh out of that.
 
Do you think that you're possibly gaining some live steam enthusiasts out of the guys @ the welding shop?  I would assume it's one of the more unusual projects they've gotten over there.
 
Then again, it's possible they are more into NASCAR or auto stuff.
 
PS:  I also spotted your metal milk crate & remember it as being another one of our indespensible shop tools.    Many a piece of angle iron has been braced on that thing.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 6th, 2007, 9:43pm
I worked sat and sun on the boiler, I was able to cut the throat sheet and weld it back at the proper angle, I did some grinding on the barrel to get the firebox where it needs to be,  I still have a  a little grinding to do.  The top of the rear tube sheet is angled back about an 1/8th so I  will grind a slight angle on the  long cuts that were made on the barrel to rotate the top of the  rear tube sheet  forward just a little, the front and rear  tube sheets need to be true to each other. I had hoped to get the firebox tacked on  the barrel on sun but this set me back a little.  Once this  grinding is done ,the next step will be to weld the firebox on. I also bought some  1" cold roll round stock to use as a temp alignment between the tube sheets, this was the idea of a friend.   I almost fell out of my chair when I called about the copper tubing. WOW is all I can say.  My tubes are going to be 36" long and there will be  21 of them at $6.50 per foot.  Also when I was figuring the weight of the boiler last week I forgot to include the weight of the tubes, which will be 50lbs.  This will put the boiler in the neighborhood of 360lbs .
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 6th, 2007, 9:50pm
throat sheet  getting welded back together , at the proper angle. This was done because it could not  be bent. This took a little longer but the result was the same.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 6th, 2007, 9:55pm
looking from the smokebox end at the firebox sitting on the barrel.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 6th, 2007, 9:59pm
throat sheet with staybolts in for a test fit. we are getting close.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 6th, 2007, 10:05pm
this pic shows the water legs between the side sheets and the rear tube sheet and throat sheet.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 6th, 2007, 10:10pm
this pic shows the round stock that will be placed in both tube sheet to make sure they are aligned with each other.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Nov 6th, 2007, 10:13pm

 
   Man, OH man, oh man. As Ben used to say. That is really somthing!! OK Ray, keep 'er' rollin now. I can't believe how massive that boiler is ending up. Nice work my friend.
 
   Bruce
Posted by: Texas_Steam Posted on: Nov 6th, 2007, 11:15pm
Ray, @ what point do you do some kind of a pressure test?  Will you do one in stages to make sure *up to that point* you're OK, do you do one major test near the end, or when it's rolling stock you run it & see if there's any excess blow off?
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 6th, 2007, 11:25pm
thanks Bruce,  I am hoping in the next day or  2 I will get the grinding done , and weld the firebox on.  Mark  ,after the boiler is comlpete , but befor it is installed, it will receive a pressure test.  This test is called a hyrdo test.  I will fill the boiler full of water , and then pump more water against the water in the boiler ,  I plan on running at 130lbs steam pressure so the hydro will be at least 260, prob closer to 300.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 11th, 2007, 8:10pm
Tonight I finished grinding the joint between the firebox and barrel to get the  rear tube sheet , where it needed to be in relation to the front tube sheet. I placed the 3  1" round stock in , and then used a level across 2 of the  pieces of round stock to check both tube sheets . were true to each other.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 11th, 2007, 8:31pm
front tube sheet with the level
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Nov 12th, 2007, 11:06am

 
   Well that sure is a clever way to insure the aspect of front and rear tube sheets to each other. I've put sheets in myself but never used that technique. Neat idea.!!
 
   Again, Ray, thanks so much for shareing this most interesting boiler build with us.
 
   Take care, cain't wait to see this in person,
 
   Bruce
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Nov 15th, 2007, 10:25am

 
   Friends,
 
   I purposely brought this thread forward due to the recent conversations directly pertaining to building boilers. And as has been mentioned, there are  many OPINIONS on this subject.  
 
   Take a peek through these pages. I do believe there is some very valuable information here that would be usefull to those who are starting out in the direction of boiler building.  
 
   It should be self evident by the pictures posted here, that this is a no nonsence, heavy boiler project. Built by a quiet, expierienced, live steamer/mechanic/welder.
 
   Take care,  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: SnG42 Posted on: Nov 16th, 2007, 12:38am
This is simply an outstanding example of a robust boiler. I saw a couple of comments about weight versus the prototype. In 1/8 scale, you would expect about 781 pounds from a 400,000 pound prototype. However, this boiler is not built to scale and shouldn't be. The completed engine will probably run nearly twice that or 1200 - 1400 pounds. What a great job! The photos and writeup could be organized as a really useful tutorial. Or magazine article.
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Nov 16th, 2007, 12:24pm
Ray has either been educated in it, is clairvoiant or is one of the most properly intuitive fabricators I have had the privilege to observe. Without dye penetrant, X-ray and ultrasound, it's impossible to make a proper assessment, but the welds are visually acceptable, for pressure vessel construction. I'd straddle this boiler at hydrostatic pressure!
 
His methodology and technique is beyond reproach. Ray's thought processes are evident in all of his work and this guy is wicked smart.
 
Ray could hang out his own shingle and hold his own with any of the commercial (steel) hobby boiler builders of whom I'm aware. Marty, watch out....This guy's a comer!
 
Greg B.
 
OT Query: Why do some people hide behind their user name? The hobby is so small that we all either know, or know of, each other.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 18th, 2007, 7:23pm
on sat. 11/17/07 the firebox and barrel became  one.  They are tack welded together, and  as soon as I finish beveling the barrel where the throat sheet attaches .  I will start welding this together
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 18th, 2007, 7:24pm
this pic shows the throat in place  being held by the staybolts, it is angled back a little from where it needs to be , due to the weight of the sheet  hanging on the staybolts.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 18th, 2007, 7:46pm
this pic shows the throat  in it's proper position.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 18th, 2007, 7:55pm
tack welds
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 18th, 2007, 7:57pm
another  view of the tack welds.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Nov 19th, 2007, 9:12am

 
   Ray,
 
   First of all. This is really looking GOOD.  I'm sure the boiler is now too heavy to lift except with the front end of your tractor. BTW, what are you looking at for a completion date or a test date. Any estimate?
 
   Again, and I know I'm repeating the words of many people, your work looks great.
Keep us updated.
 
   Take care,  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 26th, 2007, 6:54pm
today I  finally tack welded the  throat on. just a couple quick pics  as i am off to work
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 26th, 2007, 6:56pm
throat  tack welds
Posted by: SnG42 Posted on: Nov 26th, 2007, 7:08pm
The more you do, the better it looks. The quality of fitting and welding is first class.  I have worked on timing a couple of engines that didn't have valve gear fitted this well. How many passes will each staybolt take? My back hurts thinking about  it.  
 
Please keep up the detail pictures as much as you can. This is a real tutorial exercise in"'how to do it right".
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 3rd, 2007, 7:19am
I started welding the throat , last night.  I have  1 pass  on the entire throat.   I had to have  some help,  standing the boiler up. It is  prob  around  260 lbs  now.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 3rd, 2007, 7:26am
Greg,  I don't  know about  hanging a shingle out  [boiler building], I would certainly  be willing to help another  live steamer  out,  just as so many have  helped me  in the  27 years that I have  been in this hobby.  Bruce  thanks ,  this project has deff  rehoned my welding skills a bit.  I can certainly  see a difference   in my welds  from my pratice welding  befor the boiler  project began.  Sng42 thanks  , glad u are enjoying  the  pics and  project.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 3rd, 2007, 7:27am
close up
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 5th, 2007, 7:47pm
SnG42, I'm not sure  how many passes will be needed.  The other 3 boilers I built were all stick welded. This is the first boiler for me with the tig welder. I think it will be at least 2 maybe 3 passes.  Last night I welded  3 passes on the throat , I had to stop due to the large amount of heat being generated.  The plates will warp if your not careful. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 5th, 2007, 7:49pm
3 passes
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 5th, 2007, 7:50pm
3 passes
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 5th, 2007, 7:51pm
3 passes
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Dec 7th, 2007, 8:16am

 
   Ray,
 
   In my minds eye, I can already see you shoveling coal into that fire box.
I can smell the coal smoke from here, heh,heh,heh.
 
   Neat work, my friend..... Neat work.
 
   Bruce
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 18th, 2007, 8:22pm
Yes Bruce I can smell the smoke too.  It is nice to have the parts  coming together,  now it looks like a boiler ,after months of  making  seperate parts.   I ordered the copper tubes  yesterday.  They should be here friday.   There will be  21 tubes 1" od x  3'   long .  The boiler blow downs  also arrived today from railroad wharehouse, they look great.   I made the last weld on the throat  , sunday 12/16/07 .  I have a few pics of this to will post.  I then layed the boiler  on it's side, the fire box resting on the old milk crate, andthe barrel is sitting on a jack stand.  so far I have made  3 passes on the side sheet to barrel. Probably  3 or 4 more, then flip it over and  repeat on the other side sheet.  Ray III  
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Dec 18th, 2007, 8:31pm
Ray,
I can't wait to see the obligatory hydro photo, with the needle pegged at about 350psi.  
 
Greg B.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 18th, 2007, 9:13pm
here is a close up of the throat welds. 6 passes on the  throat to side sheet , and  9 passes on the throat to barrel.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 18th, 2007, 9:15pm
Me too Greg. We are getting ever closerto that day. This pic shows the boiler on it's side.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 18th, 2007, 9:17pm
this pic ,is a wider view of the throat.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Dec 18th, 2007, 9:20pm

 
   OH hell, my little pee pot project PALES in comparison to this. Those are some NICE welds BTW. You really inspired me last night. Thanks.
 
   Bruce
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 18th, 2007, 9:21pm
this pic shows the firebox ,and open backhead. once  I get the outside ofthe  outside sheets welded. I will remove the  firebox and run a seal pass on all of the joints , on the inside .  Then reinstall the firebox and begin welding the mud ring and all of those staybolts.  There are  52 stays , which is  104 welds.    
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 18th, 2007, 9:26pm
Bruce , it was nice to talk last night , and hear about all of your  projects down there, can't wait to see them for myself. This next pic shows the second pass  on the side sheet.  There are actually 3 passes now , but I don't have a pic yet.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 18th, 2007, 9:42pm
This is the last pic for tonight. It shows the  boiler on it's side  with the tig torch .  I am waiting about  10 min in between passes. In the last  couple of weeks  I have  also purchased the pipe that will be used for the  dry pipes and the steam supply lines for the throttle and  turret in the cab, it is schd 80 1/2 pipe. My steam dome will be a schd 80 weld cap .  I am going to use a sealed steam dome.  There will be  no access in this dome. I thought about  making a dome that would provide access , but feel this is  not needed , since my throttle will be in the smokebox.  The raritan has a sealed steam dome .  That boiler is now 16 years old. a few years ago I was  curious about the condition of the barrel .  since the steam dome is sealed I took the safety valves out and lowered a grain of wheat bulb in and was able to see  quite well. I was also pleased with the condition of the barrel. There are many ways to skin a cat ,this is just my method. I also bought schd 80 pipe couplings that will be cut in half and welded  on the boler  for all  water inlets  blowdown sites ,and  washout  plugs.
Posted by: Alcosteam Posted on: Dec 18th, 2007, 10:34pm
This should make Ray feel so much better about moving his boiler around. This is the boiler that will eventually go on my C&O Greenbriar.  The front bucket on the tractor sitting behind the boiler is 5 ft wide to give alittle perspective of length and at somewhere around 2100 pounds its a beast to move even on a cart.  This boiler was built in 1947 in St. Louis and to this day has yet to have a fire in it.  
 
tim
Posted by: SnG42 Posted on: Dec 18th, 2007, 10:48pm
I continue to be impressed by the incredible craftsmanship. The choice of 1" tubes instead of 3/4" is really good. It looks like your firebox is about 10" high, 16" long and maybe 12" wide. I am curious about the ratio between the grate area and the tube cross-section and am guessing the tubes will be about 11% of the grate area. I would not want any less if you are burning coal. This thing ought to really steam! Thanks for the wonderful pictures.
Posted by: Alcosteam Posted on: Dec 18th, 2007, 10:54pm
Here is a picture of the backhead.  
Ray I meant to mention you need to take a good picture of the spec numbers on that piece of boiler tube just for future reference.  If ever the need arised to get the paperwork for that tube piece I might be able to get ahold of it.  
For those following Rays progress it should be noted that the pieces of steel that go into boiler building are specific grades of low carbon tube and boiler plate.  Ordinary tube and plate steel are not acceptable as they can work harden and crack under the heat and stress of a fired pressure vessel.  As can be seen in the photos Rays boiler barrel is a piece of SA-106 grade seamless tube.    
 
tim
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 18th, 2007, 11:37pm
Tim,  I do feel a little better after seeing your boiler.  That thing is huge. I have taken some close up pics of the tube #'s. Thanks for mentioning that.   Sng42  you were close on the firebox  dimensions .  Since it is tapered the measurements change front to back.   front is 9 5/8 "wide , 8 1/2" high, rear  9 1/4 "wide 7 1/2 "high, and  grates will be  15" long.  After running the raritan  for 26 years now, and yes that is even hard for me to believe.  I have gotten used to shoveling coal almost constantly to keep that little boiler hot, and running the way people are used to seeing it run. The raritans firebox measures  4"x 6".  The last couple of years I have had the opportunity to run some very large boilered  steamers, and could not believe how easy it was to fire. I will very much enjoy that.     Ray III
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Dec 18th, 2007, 11:43pm
Tim,
Thanks for the post. That AS-106 number is ingrained on the brain of those of us who must resort to scrounging, salvaging or begging! It may not be known to some of the younger / newer guys / gals.
 
Yes, I said gals. I've worked in nuclear power plants and other places where tig welding is commom place. Some of the finest tig hands you will ever meet are gals.
 
Thanks,
Greg B.
Posted by: SnG42 Posted on: Dec 19th, 2007, 1:17am
Thanks for the specific dimensions. I am trying to learn what proportions fire well and run clean. Some that I have looked at given complaints about steaming had tube/grate ratios less than 10%. This leaves too low a draft per unit area through the grates and too low a firebed temp, resulting in a sooty fire if even slightly overfired. One of them had 1/2" flues which would soot up if you crossed your eyes. Your design shows the benefit of many years of experience as the larger flues will tolerate soot better and the higher draft through the firebed will burn cleaner. My boiler is shorter than yours and has proportionately less tube heating area, but a larger tube cross-section, thus a strong draft. It steams well and will recover from sooting up a bit sitting in the yard. The very strong draft quickly raises firebend temps and sandblasts the flues clean once you get going. You are right about firing your Raritan frequently and that comment alone tells me you really know how to keep a thin, hot fire and clean tubes.  
 
A steam engine is a collection of unstable systems. At any given time, something is going where you don't want it. Fire is burning out, water is dropping, steam is dropping,.... In training newbies, this is perhaps the hardest point to get across. Like a flywheel, a larger system has more inertia and is easier to manage since things don't change so fast. You should really enjoy this Mike. I don't know what you expect for a drawbar, but I am guessing around 300lbs, minus friction losses. Bore/stroke and driver diameter would let me guess a little closer. Good luck finding enough cars to load it down!!
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Dec 19th, 2007, 6:42am

 
   Ray,
 
   I do think we can find the cars to put a "little" load on the engine at the BCRR when you come down for the un-meet.
 
   As far as good steaming attibutes of your boiler goes. It seems a few posters here have no idea who's shadow you and even I stood in to learn the stuff to make engines run right. We were indeed fortunate to have had the expierience of learning from J. Cassady, J. Van Sickle,  B. Schneider, plus a few more "live steam gentlemen" here in Florida.
 
   One only needs to log in to "youtube, papasmurf7597" to find your Raritan running. With a boiler that you built many years ago. I do believe that these vids should show definitively if both you or I know what we are doing with either building or re-building a boiler.
 
   "Thirty eight"
 
     Bruce
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Feb 15th, 2008, 10:25pm
Bruce , I can't wait to load the engine down, and  take it up on the new trestle .  That will have to wait until next year unfortunately.  I had hoped to have it down there this year.   With the engine still, a ways from completion, I have decided to stay home this year.   I have made the trip for  the last 10 years,and I will certainly miss  being there.  I have not  worked on the boiler very much ,since  mid december [holidays and family time].  I did remove the firebox in early  jan and  run my seal welds  on the inside of the outside sheets.   While running the seal welds , the outside sheet on the firemans side warped .  This was a small setback. I have since  resolved that.  The next  step will be welding all of the pipe couplings on the boiler for  fittings  to attach to.   4 @ 1/8th" checkvalves, 2 @  1/2" safety valves,  1 @ 1/2" bottom front of barrel  for washout,  2 @ 1/4" blow downs,  2 @ 1/2" washout back of firebox ,  3 @ 1/8th" backhead for  sight glass & pressure gauge.  When all of that is done I will reinstall the firebox .  Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Feb 15th, 2008, 10:27pm
here is a pic of the seal welds that were made in early  jan
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Feb 15th, 2008, 10:28pm
this pic shows the seal welds completed.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Feb 17th, 2008, 8:13am

 
   Ray,
 
   As always, beautiful workmanship. But after knowing you all of these many years, I would expect nothing less.  
 
   I can't hardly wait for your next visit to the BCRR with that "Mike".  
 
   Safe journey on your upcomeing adventure,
 
   Bruce
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 3rd, 2008, 10:59am
Hello everybody,  the welder has been collecting dust for the last  7 weeks.  I have been out of town, borrowed out to another portion of the railroad .  There was a shortage of engineers ,and I was asked  if I would be interested .  This was  an opp I could not pass up.   A bonus of the trip , was the  railroad  museum  in Duluth MN. A wonderful collection of equipment.  Everything from a 4-4-0 to a  DM&IR m-4 yellowstone  2-8-8-4.  The icing on the cake is the  1 1/2 " scale  M-4.  I have a ton of pics to show you.  The  DM&IR used these  engines until 1960.  They saved  3 of the 18 engines.  The  one in the  museum was rebuilt by the  DM&IR & retired DM&IR employees, then donated to the  museum.  It runs  twice an hour with electric motors.  The other  2 engines are  within 30 miles of each other. One in Proctor MN, and one  in Two Harbors MN.  Both out side  but  taken care of.  I am ready to get  back into the boiler  project,  hope to start in the  next day or so.  RAY III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 3rd, 2008, 11:14am
This is the  #225  in Proctor MN.  This engine sits less than a mile from the  yard  it  used to operate out of.  these  engines weighed over 1 million lbs with tender. They  were rated at  6000 drawbar  h.p.  They were often seen pulling  180  loaded 24ft ore cars , 70 and 50 ton cars were the  norm. the trains weighed as much as 18,000 tons.  It takes  3  new diesels to do that today.    
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 3rd, 2008, 11:47am
the small hoppers in front of the  sd-40 are the same cars that the m-4 pulled 48 years ago.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 3rd, 2008, 11:52am
Here is the  DM&IR #227 in the duluth depot museum.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 3rd, 2008, 12:02pm
cab shot of the # 227
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Apr 3rd, 2008, 12:07pm
Welcome back, Ray, you've been missed. I knew you'd fall in love at the museum. I spent many weekends there, back in the 70s. Northern Minnesota, back then, was railroad heaven. Every little burg had a display of some sort.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 3rd, 2008, 12:38pm
thanks Greg.  Yes  that is a very neat  area.   railroad and  maritime .   this next pic  shows  the water glass and the  neat thing  in this pic is the plate to the right of the glass. its hard to read but the  3 lines  are for correct water  levels on diff grades. the bottom line is for level track , the  middle line is for  1% grades  and the top line for  2% grades.  These engines were  on 2% grades every day.   Trains coming down the hill from the iron range  experience  1.7 - 2 % grades.  Let me tell you  , when you  are coming down a 2% grade  with 13,000 tons ,  you better have your game face on.    It was very  challenging in a good way.    Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 3rd, 2008, 12:51pm
yours truly on the right hand seatbox of the #227
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Apr 3rd, 2008, 1:02pm
Nice Pics.  One question,  WHERE is your HOGGER HAT.  You can't run a steamer without your Kromer.
 
Tom C.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 3rd, 2008, 1:08pm
here is the 1 1/2 " scale version of the  DM&IR #225. Itwas built  by Ralph W Andres. Started in 1963 and finished in 1994. It has been on display  at the museum since  1998.  A friend of mine was used for size comparison.    Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 3rd, 2008, 1:20pm
" Nice pics but" Tom C. the hat does not make the hogger,  but just for you here is a pic of my kromer, that I have worn for  21 years now.   Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 3rd, 2008, 1:31pm
another pic of the 225
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 3rd, 2008, 1:48pm
front end detail.
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: Apr 3rd, 2008, 1:57pm
Ray, awesome pictures. That 1.5" 225 is beautiful, too bad it is running the rails either.
 
As for your hat............Dude, I thought you were bald!   lol
 
It is good to see you posting again, I have been yearning for more of your boiler build.  
 
Take care, Bobby
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 3rd, 2008, 2:01pm
George I thought of you while taking these next pics.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 3rd, 2008, 2:03pm
Thanks Bobby,  the 225 has never been fired, only ran on air.  It's good to be home. You should see  some new boiler pics in a few days.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 3rd, 2008, 2:12pm
DM&IR caboose
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 3rd, 2008, 2:16pm
Great Northern caboose
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 3rd, 2008, 2:19pm
Soo Line caboose
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 3rd, 2008, 2:34pm
This is the  terminal I ran to.  The temp on my first  northbound trip was  -27, with a wind chill of -39.   The  draw bridge  in the pic  is the  U.S border.   Canadian crews  take the train north from here. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 3rd, 2008, 2:43pm
this is a  350 h.p. double expansion engine that used to power a  army corp of engineers tug boat.  They run this with an  elec motor.  This  is in the army corp of engineers  maritime museum in Duluth MN.  They told us they  set the engine in place and built the  museum around it.     RAY III
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Apr 3rd, 2008, 2:47pm
hi ray!
 
many thanks for thinking of me!  the photos are in my 'resource' archives even as i type this.  duluth is one the must-see places for my future travels.  nice to see that live steamers are appreciated there!  
 
i'm starting some large scale projects soon, so....contact me about the ic if you like.  once i start the 2 1/2" scale, it will take up the entire build table and take a while.   now, quit having sooo much fun and get back to work on the mike!?  can't wait to see it finished!
 
moose
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 3rd, 2008, 2:54pm
This is the last pic for today. It is a  maritime pic , but still pretty cool.  I don't think you will ever get to see this  down there  Bruce, Greg, Bobby ,George.  A few days befor the  first ship was scheduled to depart, the coast gaurd ice breaker was out  opening a path for the first ship.  We just happen to be out driving around this day and found it working.  they had to cut a path about  2 or 3 miles long in the harbor to get to open water on the lake.  they would back up and use the prop to pull the water  out from under the ice , that was ahead of them, and then run ahead and get the bow on top of the ice  , the ship would then fall through the  3' thick ice.  Back up and repeat  one ship lenght at a time.  Nothing to do with trains but thought you would like to see it     Ray III
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Apr 3rd, 2008, 5:59pm

 
   Ray,
 
   Real good to see you back on here. Man, those are some great pictures. Thanks.  
 
   Take care, talk to you soon,
 
   Bruce
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: Apr 4th, 2008, 8:34am
Ray, awesome pictures thanks. You are right, if I ever see an ice breaker working "down here", then we will know that Hell froze over!
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 8th, 2008, 6:52pm
While I was away, the sheet metal shop finished there part of the hopper build for me. I picked it up yesterday. still alot to do , but  there work is just amazing.  Hopefully this is the first of  20 hoppers . Ray III
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: Apr 9th, 2008, 7:12am
Wow Ray, they did do a nice job on that sheet metal. I notice a certain jealous little Raritan trying to nose into the picture. LOL
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 27th, 2008, 7:40pm
I am finally ,back in boiler building mode.  I've been home  from my trip for over  6 weeks, and  the welder has not been turned on once.   Lots of domestic stuff taking priority.   You all know how it is.    Even though I was not welding , there was progress being made.  I teamed up with Duncan H. on 4 water glasses. I did the  first half and he will finish them.  We will each have 2  for the  loco's.  They will  have a face plate, with the bolt pattern dummied  up. on them to simulate a reflex gauge, but are actually a regular  red stripe  gauge glass.  I turned the top and bottom pieces, out of  1 1/4 " brass.  A recess was bored  on each piece ,and a viton  O ring was  inserted , in each one.  The glass will sit on the O ring, this is  the seal and a cushion.  4  8/32 rods are used to hold it together.  The other side is threaded  1/8th npt.  I also made  4 blow down valves, well I modified  them from cheap brass valves at lowes.    Ray III      
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 27th, 2008, 7:44pm
here is a pic of the  1 1/4 brass in the  10" southbend.   This lathe dates back to WWII.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 27th, 2008, 7:53pm
after the turning was completed, I  drilled the holes for the threaded rods.  This drill press was used in a bowling alley for over 30 years in there pro shop.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 27th, 2008, 8:01pm
I know this pic is a little blurry, alright alot blurry.  before I removed it from the lathe I scored a line at the proper radious ,as a guide.  So all the holes would be the same distance from the edge. then I used a square and scribed a line , accross the circle , and then another  90 degrees from the first line.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 27th, 2008, 8:23pm
here are all the parts ready for assembly
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 27th, 2008, 8:31pm
here are all of the  pieces with the viton  O rings installed
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 27th, 2008, 8:42pm
the first glass assembled.  the blow down valve is just screwed on to the glass for shipping purposes. there will be a pipe tee at the bottom of the gauge , that will attach to the backhead and the valve will screw  onto the bottom of the tee.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 27th, 2008, 8:46pm
another pic of the first glass. the white stuff you see at each end of the glass is a piece of teflon tape that has been folded over several times. I wrap it around the outside of the glass . This is only to protect the glass from side contact with the brass, not for sealing  purposes.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 27th, 2008, 8:53pm
I ordered  a new stack from R.R. warehouse and it arrived today. It is much beefier than the one that came with the kit originally.  this one has the dogs as did the I.C. mikes and it is a  little taller  too.  this should give me the look I am shooting for.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 27th, 2008, 9:01pm
a pic of both stacks, quite a difference.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 27th, 2008, 9:11pm
I started working on the boiler today.   I welded the first on many couplings onto the boiler. the big one in this pic is a washout , on the bottom of the boiler towards the front.  It was suggested to me and I thought it was a good idea, easy to put it on now.  the small coupling is for a water check valve, only one on the engineers side  ,but there will be  2 on the firemans side.  All of these are high pressure pipe couplings that I  cut in half.  I used a hole saw to bore the hole in the barrel ,and then counter sunk the hole slightly.  
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 27th, 2008, 9:15pm
this pic shows the first pass of the washout  plug.  this will sit  between driver 1 and 2.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 27th, 2008, 9:25pm
this pic shows a whole  coupling, a half of one and the first pass on  one welded in.
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: May 28th, 2008, 9:20am
Ray,  
 
It is good to see you making progress again. As always your workmanship is inspiring. The boys at the BCRR are already taking about triple and quad heading Mowhawks, Mikados, J1's and a certain smokey Atlantic!
 
On a side note, if you are not planning on using the first stack, I would be interested in it. It appears to be of the correct height as was used on the B&M Pacifics that I am planning on.  
 
Bobby
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: May 31st, 2008, 6:49pm

 
   Looking good!! Like Bobby said, your work inspires others. And thats a good thing. This is Sat.5/31/08, and even today in the middle of diamond building, a quadruple header was mentioned.  If we could get a certain owner of a #22 to get involved it might even be a "quintuple header". Would'nt that be something to see!.
 
   Talk to you soon,
 
   Bruce
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 1st, 2008, 10:04pm
Thanks Bobby, for the kind words.  It feels real good to be working on the boiler again.  I need to get busy ,  un -meet 09  will be here before we know it.  Consider the stack yours Bobby.  Bruce  a quintuple would be a awesome sight.   I think we can  talk Cam into a visit  in Feb.   I should have some more  pics  in a couple of days.  The 12" to the foot has been rather busy this week.  Ray III
Posted by: sonex761 Posted on: Jun 9th, 2008, 9:12am
I am doing research on boiler building for my project a 0-4-0.  I am wondering about welding.  I know that in aviation application that sometimes a MIG is not an acceptable welding method.  Is MIG acceptable for boiler building?
 
Stephen
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 12th, 2008, 12:05am
Stephen
 My  exp. with mig was  in several fabrication shops, 22 years ago.  I am sure alot has changed since then.   It was all  steel fabrication , never any pressure vessels.  I would  recommend , stick or  tig , either one will do a fine job.  I used a lincoln buzz box [ stick welder ] on the first  3 boilers.  One of them [raritan]  is now on it's  17th year.   The boiler I am working on now  is  completely tig welded.  The other  3 were all stick welded.   Hope this helps     RAY III
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Jun 13th, 2008, 7:54pm

 
   Stephen,
 
   I've worked in pressureized equipment for almost fifty years now (refrigeration/air conditioning). The very peaceful refrigerator in your kitchen runs at higher pressure, on one side of the system, than do our live steamers. I've done braze joints on them and AC systems, that are way higher pressure than anything we run, but I still will not build my own boiler.
   When my Atlantic needed a new boiler, I had a professional welder build it for me. He also is a live steamer. This being said, one can see the professionalizm in the welds that steamheaton has displayed in this thread. The pics of this boiler speak volumes about practice and expierience.
   You've received some good advise from others here. All I can say is that a boiler should be "UN-fooled-around-with". There are many items on a live steamer that can be "fatidled", but, not the boiler.
 
   Take care,  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Jun 13th, 2008, 10:03pm
Stephen,
I can find no fault with the advice from Ray and Bruce. They are both eminent Live Steamers of long experience. I know Bruce, and his kettle, well. I have been privileged to make Ray's aquaintence and see his equipment perform. 'Nuff said.
 
I owned my own prototyping and fabrication business and one thing I learned, REAL FAST, is that it is far less expensive to hire the skills you are lacking. (One nice thing about owning the joint is the things you can observe and learn, in the guise of "supervision")I have also been a Nationally Licensed tech inspector for the SCCA, where shoddy welds are rampant.
 
One of the most dangerous tools (based on results, not operation) I have seen come on the market are these little mig welders. You can run the most beautiful bead with one, and it won't hold crap. Whereas you can scab together two pieces of steel, with an old Lincoln 225. It may not be pretty, but it will hold 'til hell freezes over. Welding is as much art as science, that's why it is called a skilled trade. I have, at one time or another, welded some fairly critical stuff. I won't weld my own boilers...
 
Greg B.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Jun 14th, 2008, 8:58am
I'm with everyone on the need for proper welding equipment and skills for building a boiler.  What most people do (if they are "building" their own boiler) is to perform the cutting, forming and fitting themselves, but then hire a skilled welder to put it together.  Of course, the boiler must be properly designed and the right materials used.  On a typical boiler there's a lot more hours required in the fabrication and fitting than the actual welding.
Dan Watson
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Jun 14th, 2008, 2:45pm
One other thing.  My daughter has a friend who is a welder in the boilermaker's union.  All of the welding he does is either TIG or stick.  He says they typically do the root pass on a weld with TIG and subsequent passes with stick, but never use MIG.
Posted by: sonex761 Posted on: Jun 15th, 2008, 11:57am
Hey, thanks for all the help.  I think I have decided to let someone else weld my boiler.  It is obvious I do not have the equipment to do it.
 
Stephen
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 8:48pm
I have been busy welding on the boiler.  The latest project was welding all of the couplings on the boiler.  There are  10 couplings in all.   They are all welded on now and I will be installing the steam supply lines for the  manifold and  and smokebox throttle next.  The last  2 weekends I have taken the raritan to train meets .  Fired up for  6 hours at each one.  What  a nice way to spend the day. So there are lots of pics to post.  This pic shows backhead with first washout in place ready for welding .
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 8:51pm
this pic shows both backhead washouts welded on .
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 8:58pm
this pic shows  backhead washouts , the back side  with sealwelds.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 9:00pm
boiler side view with checkvalve holes on firemans side.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 9:04pm
this is the seal weld  on bottom of barrel washout.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 9:07pm
this pic shows checkvalve first weld firemans side.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 9:09pm
pic shows  bar stock used to hold  coupling from behind . this keeps it flush on the inside.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 9:13pm
this pic shows second coupling with a pipe nipple  threaded in  as a handle , while tack welding them in.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 9:16pm
this is the first weld on the second check valve  coupling.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 9:34pm
pic of seal welds on checkvalves.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 9:36pm
boiler side view with 2 check valves fireman side.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 9:38pm
pic of eng side check valve.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 9:40pm
safety valve layout with 2 couplings next next to marks.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 9:42pm
pic of first safety valve hole cut out, with hole saw.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 9:43pm
pic of second hole with hole saw.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 9:46pm
pic of 2 holes for safety valves
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 9:56pm
pic of first safety coupling welded, and second  one beveled.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 9:58pm
pic of  1 welded second  one half welded.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 10:00pm
both safety couplings welded with pipe plugs to protect threads.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 10:01pm
safety valve seal welds.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 10:04pm
pic of blow down coupling with first pass.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 10:06pm
last boiler pic, shows blow down coupling on firemans side.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 10:17pm
the next set of pics are from  last weekend  6/14/08 at the track of  Kenny Davis.  this pic is of Tom Z.  on K-4 owned by Ed P. going over the diamond.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 10:23pm
pic of Jim R.  and  his  fairbanks morse .
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 10:25pm
pic of G.P.9 owned by Ed P.  believe it or not this  body  is made of wood.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 10:29pm
pic of wagner hudson owned by Kenny Davis.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 10:31pm
pic of wagner jubilee owned by Kenny Davis.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 10:34pm
Pic of Kenny Davis on Ed's K-4 on the trestle.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 10:37pm
pic of Tom Z. pulling the throttle on the raritan.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 10:39pm
pic of  a beautiful wabash caboose built by Jim R.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 10:40pm
My turn on the K-4
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 10:42pm
the k-4 easing by the wabash caboose.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 10:45pm
these next pics are  from this  weekend at Ray D's  home.    first pic is of a grain elevator.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 10:46pm
a pic of Ray's  round house.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 10:47pm
pic of wabash hudson owned by Ray D.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 10:49pm
pic of GM&O pacific owned by Ray D.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 10:53pm
pic of scotty mogul owned by Ray D.  This is a sister engine to Andrew  H's  mogul.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 10:56pm
last pic is of the raritan  and Ed P's  2-8-0. we double headed for about 4 hours.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 11:08pm

 
   Ray,
 
   This may sound unbelievable, but your welding on that boiler makes me "speachless". That is one nice piece of work my friend.
 
   And the pics from the meets. Thankyou so much for shareing. Looked like you plus others were haveing a good time. Great pics.
 
   Take care,  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 22nd, 2008, 11:16pm
Thanks  Bruce.  I am so glad  you suggested I do a progress report with pics of the boiler project.   It has been fun explaining the  process.   Yes  both train meets were alot of fun.  between the  two meets the raritan was fired up for  12 hours.  Ray III
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: Jun 23rd, 2008, 7:44am
Ray, we are running out of adjectives and accolades to show our admiration of your boiler building techniques. Those are the prettiest welds I have ever seen.
 
The meet pic's are making me envious, between all the track work and rain, we haven't been able to play much here
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Jun 23rd, 2008, 1:09pm
Ray,
You sure do pretty work. I'm glad to see those seal welds. A lot of people, in the hobby, either wouldn't be aware of them or would choose to ignore them.
 
Nice to see the Rariten out and about.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 23rd, 2008, 4:53pm
thanks Bobby ,and Greg
        
      It sure is nice to get to read about each others projects.  Learn  some tricks here and there.  Then get together  once a year and see the progress in person.  what a great hobby. Ray III
Posted by: Ollie Posted on: Jul 24th, 2008, 12:45pm
Any updates?  
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: Jul 24th, 2008, 5:24pm
Ollie, I am sure if there were any updates they would be posted. I know Ray is extremely busy with work right now and the boiler has probably been moved to the back burner for right now.  
 
Sometimes our projects don't move along as fast as we would like, but we must be patient.
 
But, since you have taken the time to venture here, maybe you could tell us a little about yourself and live steam experience / adventures.
 
Bobby
Posted by: Ollie Posted on: Jul 25th, 2008, 1:21pm
on Jul 24th, 2008, 5:24pm, B+MNW21201 wrote:       (Click here for original message)

 
But, since you have taken the time to venture here, maybe you could tell us a little about yourself and live steam experience / adventures.
 

 
I don't really have any.  
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Jul 25th, 2008, 8:06pm

 
   Ollie,
 
   I've tried to stay out of this for a while. But I do have a few suggestions for you. Take the time to go back through this thread. You will see what "steamheaton" has accomplished and is accomplishing in the live steam hobby. And, you might even learn a little about the man, who just happens to be a live steamer. There is plenty of information already posted here that should occupy your time without any UPDATES.
 
   Also, while drifting throguh the thread, you SHOULD notice that when "steaheaton" has taken a few more steps in his projects, he promptly
post the UPDATES that you are asking about. Continuealy requesting  
"updates" in five word posts will not hurry the process of building a boiler for an 1 1/2 inch scale Illinois Central Mikado.
 
   My last suggestion for you is this. BE patient. I'm not so old that I don't remember being your age. But patience is something that needs to be practiced. Particularly in the live steam hobby. Go into a few of the other threads here instead of posting one liners. You just might lern a thing or two from the hand full of good live steamer/ride on scale hobbyists that post here.
 
   OK, I'm off of my soap box. But believe me, when "steamheaton" has an UPDATE on his boiler project, HE WILL POST IT !!!!!! Be patient!
 
   Bruce
Posted by: Ollie Posted on: Jul 26th, 2008, 9:26am
on Jul 25th, 2008, 8:06pm, ErieAtlantic7597 wrote:       (Click here for original message)

 
   Ollie,
 
   I've tried to stay out of this for a while. But I do have a few suggestions for you. Take the time to go back through this thread. You will see what "steamheaton" has accomplished and is accomplishing in the live steam hobby. And, you might even learn a little about the man, who just happens to be a live steamer. There is plenty of information already posted here that should occupy your time without any UPDATES.
 
   Also, while drifting throguh the thread, you SHOULD notice that when "steaheaton" has taken a few more steps in his projects, he promptly
post the UPDATES that you are asking about. Continuealy requesting  
"updates" in five word posts will not hurry the process of building a boiler for an 1 1/2 inch scale Illinois Central Mikado.
 
   My last suggestion for you is this. BE patient. I'm not so old that I don't remember being your age. But patience is something that needs to be practiced. Particularly in the live steam hobby. Go into a few of the other threads here instead of posting one liners. You just might lern a thing or two from the hand full of good live steamer/ride on scale hobbyists that post here.
 
   OK, I'm off of my soap box. But believe me, when "steamheaton" has an UPDATE on his boiler project, HE WILL POST IT !!!!!! Be patient!
 
   Bruce

 
Sorry I'm just kinda impatient sometimes  
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Jul 26th, 2008, 5:27pm

 
   Ollie,
 
   I also am sorry for jumping up on my soap box. I completely understand about wanting things to happen a little quicker. But I can tell you from personal expierience, that haste in the live steam hobby useually ends up with bad results. I'm sure you looked over the pics of the process of building that boiler that steamheaton is involved in. What really stands out, at least to me as a live steamer, is the attention to detail that Ray is incorporating into this major project.
 
   Also, I'm fairly sure you've seen some of the pics of the track work that I like to do. It takes time and patience. But nice track is always nice track. No matter who is building it.  
 
   In almost forty years as a live steamer, I've seen a lot of beautiful equipment and track facilities. But every once in a while, something crops up where  someone wanted to either have something running quickly or wanted to have track on the ground right now. These situations useually end up either real bad or being rebuilt .
 
   So again, I appologize if I came off a little turse, but when Ray has some more pics available, we all here will be the first to see the progress he's made.
 
   Take care,  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Jul 28th, 2008, 10:30am
hi all,
 
ollie:  not to seem like i'm throwing salt on the wound, but bruce is right.  in this hobby, patience is a virtue.  it takes time.  now, about that lack of hobby experience...go back to the main menu and start with the 'how to' threads, then go to the very first page of the 'building live steam railcars...' thread.  when you're done with all the pages in that thread, you should be ready to ask questions about the equipment you want to build!  with guidance, your live steam experience begins...now.  
 
building a loco should done after you know how a railcar and rails work together.  without that understanding, most people build equipment that won't stay on the rails.  we're here to help you on your journey.  watching steaminheaton is a great way to gain knowledge, but understand, his journey has taken him a long way.  as i teach, so he is teaching.  i, too, look forward to his posts...i'm learning from him as well.
 
hope this is the push you needed to get started!
 
moose the caboose
 
 
on Jul 25th, 2008, 1:21pm, Ollie wrote:       (Click here for original message)

 
I don't really have any.  

Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 4th, 2008, 12:02am
Now where was I ??    Thats what I have been asking myself lately.     Ollie  I can appreciate your enthusiasm,  and I am glad you are enjoying the post.   As Bobby George,and Bruce have stated , the  12" to the  foot  railroad has kept me very busy lately, toooooooooooo busy infact.   The last thing  posted, was the couplings being welded on.  The next  job was to locate the holes and  figure the length of the supply lines.  These are both 1/2"  schd 80 pipe.  The print calls for  3/8ths for the throttle  and  1/4 for the  manifold in the cab.   They would have to order the 3/8ths and  1/4 in schd 80 .  I would have to buy 20ft of each.   I had to buy 20 ft of the 1/2 schd 80 [min order] for the stay or dry tubes anyway, and it was instock, with plenty of pipe leftover , hence the  1/2"  supply lines.  The elbows I used on the supply lines , are heavy duty high pressure fittings. They should last a long time.  This boiler will have a sealed steam dome.   There will  be no access to this dome.  The throttle will be in the smoke box, and it is less work to use a weld cap.  If I should need  to enter the boiler in that area , I  will remove the safetys.   Ray III                        
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 4th, 2008, 12:38am
this first pic is the boiler  print , with the  supply lines  fitted together , and checking the fit, against the boiler  specs.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 4th, 2008, 12:40am
this pic shows the first hole in the barrel for the supply lines
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 4th, 2008, 12:46am
this pic shows  both supply lines  on top of the boiler, inverted.  They will actually  be placed inside the barrel with the nipples sticking up through the holes in the barrel.  I was just checking the fit.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 4th, 2008, 12:48am
one more pic of  supply pipes from rear.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 4th, 2008, 12:52am
this pic shows  , the schd 80 weld cap, that I am using for my steam dome.  I had to grind  a radius  to match the barrel.  The tractor bucket makes a very handy work bench. It keeps all the grinding mess outside.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 4th, 2008, 12:54am
another view of grinding the radius.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 4th, 2008, 12:58am
this pic shows , cap on boiler , with grinding half way done checking the fit.  The green cap is how it fit before grinding. The green cap is schd 40 and the black one is schd 80.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 4th, 2008, 1:00am
pic shows grinding complete, with bevel  ready for welding.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 4th, 2008, 1:02am
this pic shows finished cap ,back view.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 4th, 2008, 1:03am
last pic for tonight.  cap in my hand showing the radius.  Ray III
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: Aug 4th, 2008, 8:40am
Wow Ray, nice work. I have to keep reminding myself that you are using a hand held grinder and not any form of milling machine to get these tight fits. It is a true testament to what can be done with basic tools, forethought and plenty of patience.  
Bobby
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 4th, 2008, 11:56am
Thanks Bobby.  believe me, I wish I had a mill,  as you can see  I don't have the room for it  right now LOL.   When you have to get buy ,with what ever you have , it forces you to be creative.    On the raritan, which has a 6" boiler , I  made a fixture to hold the sand dome and cut that radius on the lathe. This boiler is too big for that.   I made a paper template out of a paper plate.  It had the radius of the barrel , transferred it to the weld cap and started grinding.  Ray III
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Aug 4th, 2008, 10:11pm

 
   As our dear friend Ben used to say,"Man, oh man, now thats somethin".
I could not agree more. I can't wait for your next trip down here with this beauty. It should be awesome!
 
   Thanks for posting these latest pics Ray.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 17th, 2008, 11:48pm
Hello everyone,  I worked on the boiler  most of the day.   The next set of pics will cover the installation of the steam supply lines for the smoke box throttle and the manifold on the backhead.  Before I could start on that I had to bevel the the back of the barrel.   I had already  beveled the outside sheets, but had not done the barrel at the rear.   This had to be done before  starting the supply lines .  The rear nipple  would be in the way of the  grinding wheel , and I did not want to take a chance of messing up the threads on it once it was welded in.  So I went ahead and beveled the barrel .  The first pic is  the rear barrel  before i beveled it.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 17th, 2008, 11:49pm
barrel after it was beveled
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 17th, 2008, 11:50pm
this pic shows the hole for the manifold nipple , and it has been counter sunk.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 17th, 2008, 11:52pm
the next pic shows the 2 holes  for the nipples in the steam dome. 1 for the throttle line and 1 going back to the manifold.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 17th, 2008, 11:54pm
This is a different angle on the same 2 holes. It gives you a better idea of there location.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 18th, 2008, 12:00am
Next pic shows the 2 holes for the nipples plus the 6  3/8th holes that will allow steam to enter the dome . This was suggested to me by a very good live steamer  Duncan H.    Plenty of steam will get in but the remaining barrel material will act as a baffle.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 18th, 2008, 12:02am
same view with saftey nipples  in the pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 18th, 2008, 12:04am
this pic shows the steam dome holes after I used the air sander on them to prepare the metal for welding of the  nipples and steam dome.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 18th, 2008, 12:07am
pic shows welding wire acting as a second pair of hands.  It held the line in place , had to bend it a few times to get it right  ,but worked pretty good.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 18th, 2008, 12:08am
pic shows a close up of wire holding manifold end of supply line.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 18th, 2008, 12:12am
pic shows front end of rear supply line being held by the wire.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 18th, 2008, 12:14am
this is an inside the barrel view of the supply line hangers.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 18th, 2008, 12:15am
manifold nipple at proper height and ready for welding.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 18th, 2008, 12:16am
pic shows first pass on manifold nipple side view.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 18th, 2008, 12:18am
pic shows a rear view of  the  manifold nipple first pass.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 18th, 2008, 12:22am
pic shows front nipple of rear supply line, welded.  These were not counter sunk and will only receive one good pass.  They are only holding the pipe up in the dome .  The seal will be  from the welds  on the dome itself.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 18th, 2008, 12:26am
pic shows nipples for the throttle line to the front ,and the  manifold line to the rear, both welded. This is now ready for the dome to be welded on.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 18th, 2008, 12:27am
pic shows overhead view of the nipples in the dome welded.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 18th, 2008, 12:31am
pic shows the front end of the throttle line, this will pass through and be welded to the front tube sheet.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 18th, 2008, 12:32am
pic shows a side view of steam dome nipples.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 18th, 2008, 12:33am
this is a cose up of the steam dome nipples.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 18th, 2008, 12:35am
this is the last pic for tonight.  Inside view of the supply lines after  being welded in. I hope to weld the steam dome on tomorrow.
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Aug 18th, 2008, 8:35am
You sure can lay down a pretty bead.  Enjoy you pics.
 
Tom C.
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Aug 18th, 2008, 11:20am
Beautiful workmanship, as usual, Ray. Thanks for the update.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: Henry Posted on: Aug 18th, 2008, 12:09pm
Ray,
 
Everything looks great! I have mig, stick and gas welding equipment here, but you've given me a serious case of welder's envy with your photos here! I wish I did enough welding to justify getting a tig setup!
 
Henry
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Aug 18th, 2008, 9:45pm

 
    Absolutely AWESOME !!!!! Beautiful work !! Ray, I can hear that thing climbing the great trestle at the BCRR already.  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 19th, 2008, 1:15am
Tom C. thankyou,  believe me those beads were not pretty when I bought the welder , a year and a half ago.   I had not done any tig welding in over 20 years.  All welding  done at home was stick.   I ran plenty of practice passes on scrap material before starting the boiler,  you never loose it you just are not as sharp.  Greg ,  just knowing that you and  the others are enjoying the progress reports, makes the picture taking , loading onto the computer and explaing the process, all very worth while.  Henry  I have wanted a tig welder for years, many years , just like you I could not justify, buying one.  Until I decided to build this boiler.  I found this welder on ebay,  it was in a machine shop in chicago that was relocating, and they did not need this welder anymore.    You would never know it from looking at it or welding with it, this welder was built in 1962.   All copper and weighs 875lbs.   Bruce  thankyou,  I can't wait  to hear the mike climb the trestle either. Ray III
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: Aug 19th, 2008, 9:45am
Sorry Ray, but I have run out of adjectives to describe my admiration and even envy of your skills. I like the other gentlemen here, really enjoy watching the building process. To see how it goes together or as Bruce likes to say, the "nuts and bolts" of the hobby. Thanks.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 11th, 2008, 9:56pm
I am finally getting around to posting my progress pics.  These are from the last few weeks.  With very little spare time lately,  I just let the pics pile up.  This first pic is of the manifold nipple with 3 passes on it.     Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 11th, 2008, 10:06pm
this pic shows the nipple weld and the seal weld on the elbow. The seal weld on the elbow was a pain in the butt,  next time I will either use a stick welder and bend a rod  to reach  the tight spots or  just not do it.   The reason I say  that is because the other end of that pipe going to the steam dome is not seal welded,  hindsight is 20/20.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 11th, 2008, 10:14pm
This pic shows the steam dome tacked on for the first time.   I say first time ,because after talking with  Bruce R. and Pete B.   , they  suggested  drilling a drain hole in the barrel, on the low sides of the dome.   I was very  glad we talked before the first pass was on.   So the tack welds were ground off ,and steam dome removed.    
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 11th, 2008, 10:16pm
pic shows steam dome removed,  without drain holes.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 11th, 2008, 10:19pm
pic shows drain holes  drilled .  These will be just inside the dome wall.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 11th, 2008, 10:22pm
pic shows dome back on with tack welds.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 11th, 2008, 10:22pm
1st pass on dome.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 11th, 2008, 10:23pm
3 passes on dome.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 11th, 2008, 10:25pm
pic shows  boiler side view with dome on.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 11th, 2008, 10:29pm
there are a total of 5 passes on the dome , in this pic.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 11th, 2008, 10:31pm
5 passes with paint ,to protect welds.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 11th, 2008, 10:33pm
pic shows boiler standing on end , with dome welded on.   I am starting to see the light at the end of the tunnel.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 11th, 2008, 10:38pm
this pic shows the firebox ,on my portable workbench.   I notched the middle girder to allow clearance for the elbow of the manifold supply line,  then realized that I would need to shorten  the entire  middle girder .  The middle girder is now  1/2 shorter than the  2 outside girders.  3/4 of an  inch shorter under the elbow.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 11th, 2008, 10:41pm
this pic shows the middle girder and the  clearance  needed ,  i gave myself a little extra for  room to adjust firebox while fitting  to boiler.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 11th, 2008, 10:43pm
this pic shows the short girder  , outside view.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 11th, 2008, 10:47pm
the firebox and boiler are fitted together,  with stay bolts installed but not welded .
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 11th, 2008, 10:48pm
looking in the firebox, with stays installed .
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 11th, 2008, 10:49pm
last pic for tonight. outside sheet, engineers side with stay bolts installed, but not welded.
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: Sep 12th, 2008, 8:53am
Ray, at the rate you are progressing I am thinking that Un-Meet 09 just might be a possibility
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Sep 12th, 2008, 4:58pm

 
   Ray, that is some beautiful workmanship. Even an my age, I'm bound and determined to learn how to weld like that... Just beautiful work!
 
   As I said in the 7597 boiler build thread, between these two threads, there is quite a story in pictures. Just the huge difference in the size of the boilers alone.
 
   Ray, I'm glad that we could all share in these two boiler builds here on railfan.net. I believe its sort of unuseual to have two going on at once.
 
   Thanks for the great pics,
 
   Bruce
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 14th, 2008, 1:54pm
Bobby, I hope your right.   Most of my spare time is going to the engine project.   I can't imagine coming down in feb without the mike running , and since I'm planning on coming down, it has to finished.     Bruce ,   keep practicing  running beads.  You know the proper angles for the torch and rod, it's just a matter of repetition.   When you talk about these 2 boiler building threads going  at the same time, and it possibly helping someone.  I can relate to that , in the form of my Modeltec issue [worn and missing it's cover] feb 1987,  with an article titled guide for locomotive boiler construction.  This  great article , with tons of references to specs on material, spacing, and welding practices, was my boiler building thread back in the day.  I truly hope our threads do help someone.   As that feb 87 article helped me.    Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 14th, 2008, 2:37pm
The railroad  left me alone for a few hours yesterday,and  I made some  good progress with the time.    I located and drilled the hole  on the front tube sheet , where the steam supply line will pass through the front tube sheet for the throttle.  This had to be done , in order to slide the sheet over the supply line .  Once the sheet was in temporarly, I could now check the  firebox and front tube sheet for alignment.   Once  it was determinded that the firebox was  in a good place , it was tack welded in.  the next set of pics will show what i just described.  Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 14th, 2008, 2:44pm
pic shows front tube sheet and tools used to layout the mark for drilling
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 14th, 2008, 2:48pm
pic shows a mark scribed at 2 & 7/8" inches from center.    The center lines that were layed out early in the project are still being used  as reference points.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 14th, 2008, 2:58pm
pic shows tube sheet on drill press.  The 7/8ths hole saw that I planned on using developed a wobble, and wanted to cut a hole  over an inch in dia.    I went to town to replace the 7/8ths hole saw ,  and could not find one .   I had to regroup , my backup plan included a  3/4" hole saw and a 7/8ths drill bit.   My drill press does not turn slow enough for that large of a drill bit, but  did use it to open the hole after using the  3/4 hole saw.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 14th, 2008, 2:59pm
7/8 ths drill used to open the hole to proper dia.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 14th, 2008, 3:02pm
pic shows tube sheet , checking fit on supply line.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 14th, 2008, 3:08pm
pic shows  hole after being counter sunk for welding
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 14th, 2008, 3:11pm
this pic was inspired by Bruces  pic looking down the tube from the front on his new boiler.  I looked in the firedoor and thought this was a neat view.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 14th, 2008, 3:14pm
pic shows  firebox with level on rods to check alignment.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 14th, 2008, 3:14pm
pic of level in firebox.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 14th, 2008, 3:15pm
pic of level on front tube sheet.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 14th, 2008, 3:19pm
this pic shows the firebox with tack welds on the mudring.  I will prob locate the dry pipe holes , on the front tube sheet and backhead sheet next. Ray III
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Sep 14th, 2008, 8:08pm

 
   Ray,
 
   Great pictures and descriptions. I could not agree with you more. I certainly hope that those that are really interested in live steam are getting some hard to come by information from the two boiler building threads.
 
   So many of the views in the pics that you and I have posted are only seen by those that build the boilers. All too many times, the boiler is purchased by a live steamer for his engine in finished form. Hence he never sees the "guts" of the boiler.
 
   again, thanks so much for the great pics of this build.
 
   Bruce
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Sep 14th, 2008, 10:51pm
on Sep 14th, 2008, 8:08pm, ErieAtlantic7597 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Ray,   So many of the views in the pics that you and I have posted are only seen by those that build the boilers. All too many times, the boiler is purchased by a live steamer for his engine in finished form. Hence he never sees the "guts" of the boiler.   again, thanks so much for the great pics of this build.    Bruce

Bruce,   How true.  I to have purchased a boiler built for me by Ridge Locomotive Works.  I did stop over and see it once.  I see both ends of the boiler when I clean the flues and feed the firebox.  I did pull the steam dome for a boiler wash a few times so have seen the insides but Ray shows us the rest of the story.  A lot goes into it.  Thanks all.
 
Tom C.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 15th, 2008, 10:48pm
I spent most of the day, with the welder turned on.  All of the staybolts are tack welded in and 10 of them have the first pass on them.   I also  have the first pass  on the mudring  to outside sheet  finished.  this first pic shows , the eng side  with stays all tack welded.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 15th, 2008, 10:51pm
this pic shows the mudring with the first pass completed.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 15th, 2008, 10:55pm
This pic shows the boiler after I rolled it onto it's side.  Before I welded the dome and couplings on it was fairly easy to roll over.  Now with all of that applied  it is pretty tricky,  and it is over 300#  too.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 15th, 2008, 10:59pm
pic shows a diff angle of boiler on it's side.  I used  2 straps  to keep it in place. I have rolled it  onto it's side so I can start welding the stays .
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 15th, 2008, 11:06pm
pic shows close up of firebox on it's side, ready for welding.  It has been close to a year since I counter sunk these sheets , so I used a wire brush in a drill to clean them before I started welding.  Clean  metal is key to a good weld.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 15th, 2008, 11:07pm
this pic shows the first pass on the first 4 staybolts eng. side
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 15th, 2008, 11:10pm
this pic shows  inside of firebox , with the first  pass on 5 of the stays.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 15th, 2008, 11:11pm
last pic for tonight, looking into the firebox from the front.  Ray III
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: Sep 16th, 2008, 7:27am
Ray the workmanship is most impressive. I am really looking forward to seeing this beast run for the first time, and I know I am not the only one either.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Sep 16th, 2008, 7:48am

 
    W--O--W,     thats all I can say.
 
   Bruce R.
 
 
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 22nd, 2008, 12:07am
Hello everyone,  I have been welding up a storm.   The staybolts on both side sheets are now completely welded.   There are 3 passes on each end of each staybolt.  52 staybolts ,  thats 312 welds on the staybolts alone.  I still have to weld the 4 staybolts on the throat, which I hope to do tomorrow.   There are  4 on the backhead as well that still need to welded  The next set of pics will cover what I just described. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 22nd, 2008, 12:10am
this pic shows  eng side, outside sheet  with 2nd pass on all staybolts and the 3rd pass on 8 of them.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 22nd, 2008, 12:12am
pis shows eng side , outside sheet with 3rd pass on all stays.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 22nd, 2008, 12:16am
next pic shows firemans side , inside sheet  with 3rd pass on all stays.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 22nd, 2008, 12:20am
this pic shows the boiler after I have rolled it over to weld the other  2 sheets.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 22nd, 2008, 12:23am
next pic shows ,fireman side , outside sheet with most stays having there 2nd pass , and  the middle row with the  1st pass.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 22nd, 2008, 12:26am
pic is looking through fire door on eng side  . Some have the 1st and some have the 2nd pass.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 22nd, 2008, 12:28am
pic shows eng side , some have 1st pass and some have 2nd pass.   Same as last pic , different angle.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 22nd, 2008, 12:34am
the next 4 pics , were taken by my wife.  I asked her to take some of me welding, to show this project from a different perspective . In the first  2 pics I have my leg up on a chair , that puts my left  leg in a good place to rest my left arm which is holding the tig torch.  You will have much better control of the torch if you can rest against something.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 22nd, 2008, 12:37am
this pic is similar to the last , at just a slightly diff angle.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 22nd, 2008, 12:38am
the next  2 pics find me inside the firebox .
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 22nd, 2008, 12:42am
this pic is similar to the last at a slightly different angle.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 22nd, 2008, 12:46am
this pic shows, eng side, inside sheet , all with 2nd pass , and some with 3rd pass.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 22nd, 2008, 12:48am
this pic is a close up of the last pic.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 22nd, 2008, 12:49am
this pic shows the outside sheet  firemans side , with 3rd pass on all stays
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 22nd, 2008, 12:51am
pic shows eng side inside sheet ,only 5 stays left for the 3rd pass.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 22nd, 2008, 12:53am
last pic for tonight.  Eng side ,inside sheet with 3rd pass on all stays.  1st and 2nd passes , I used 3/32 welding rod , the 3rd pass I used 1/8th rod.   Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 22nd, 2008, 11:39pm
Today  I  lifted the boiler off of the stand with the tractor.  It weighs  at least 300# now.  Once it was off the stand, I stood it up on the firebox end.  This would enable me to weld the outside stays on the throat sheet, which is the sheet under the boiler at the front of the firebox.  After these stays were welded, I then flipped the boiler, which put the firebox end up, so I could weld the throat stays on the inside of the firebox.  With the throat stays welded ,  the boiler was lifted again and returned to the stand.   I then began to run passes around the mud ring.   It looks like there will be 4 passes on each side of the mudring material.   It would have been nice to get this done today,  with the argon tank empty [ argon is the shielding gas used  for tig welding steel] the welding came to a halt.    So here are the pics of the todays progress.   Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2008, 12:00am
1st pic , lifting boiler off stand.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2008, 12:03am
next  2 pics are diff angles ,lifting boiler off of the stand.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2008, 12:04am
dome side, in this pic.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2008, 12:06am
next pic shows boiler standing, on firebox end.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2008, 12:07am
standing on firebox end side view.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2008, 12:09am
this pic shows close up of outside throat sheet staybolt welds , with 3 passes.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2008, 12:10am
pic shows outside throat stays and firebox .
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2008, 12:11am
pic shows inside throat welds and firebox.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2008, 12:12am
lifting boiler to put back on stand.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2008, 12:13am
another view of lifting boiler.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2008, 12:14am
almost back on the stand.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2008, 12:16am
looking down into the firebox with 2nd pass on the mud ring.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2008, 12:17am
last pic for tonight.  A side view of boiler back on stand.
Posted by: B+MNW21201 Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2008, 8:57am
Ray,
 
I don't know how to break this to you, but looking at your photo's it is clear that the sides of the firebox are not even. They are at least .0000000001" off from each other. Knowing how precise you like things I know you will want to start from scratch to get it right. But being the friend I am, I will dispose of this one for you to make room for your new one. Do you need my shipping address?  
 
This has been one great tutorial on boiler building.  
 
Bobby
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2008, 11:04am
Bobby there have been many sleepless night over the discrepancies in the side sheets.  LOL.      I have decided to try and live with it.   Hope this does not slow you down on your efforts , to obtain a boiler.          Thanks , I have enjoyed explaining and showing pics of my progress.   Ray III
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2008, 3:19pm
Ray,
Those four-wheel, hydraulic boiler lifters are sure handy!
 
To reiterate Bobby's sentiment; Thanks for the lessons.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2008, 7:27pm
hi all,
 
ray:  i can't thank you enough for posting your mike project here...it's amazing!  there are other boiler projects shown on the internet, but this one and the erie-atlantic have been the most clear and concise depictions yet.  there are some fantasic boiler techs out there, but sometimes their work is hard to find and identify.  at least here, i can see your boiler from start to finish...i've learned so much.  of all the things we do or say, education and edification are highest, best things we do for each other.  for that i'm most grateful.  what i do maybe technically challenging...what you're doing is simply amazing.
 
moose
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Sep 24th, 2008, 9:25pm

 
   Friends,
 
   Hopefully, when my new glasses get here, and, at this late point in my life, I want to TRY to learn how to weld like that. In almost forty years in this hobby, I've seen some real masters at work and their workmanship. Some of us original posters here know exactly of whom I referr.  
 
   Ray, you have brought yourself to the level of craftsmanship of some of the chrished few who have gone on ahead of us here in Florida. I know some of the newer folks here might think this sounds like a lot of bull, but your handy work is just beautiful. All they need to do is go back in this thread and take a gander. Nuff said!!  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 25th, 2008, 11:27am
Bobby,Greg, George,and Bruce.    Thanks for the kind words.   We all contribute to this great site, and it has become quite a resource.    Ray III
Posted by: Rick_Pike Posted on: Sep 25th, 2008, 4:48pm
Ray,
  Thanks for the great post. I am very interested in the building of your boiler as I have a Railroad Supply Mikado. It was built in the late 70's early 80's time frame. When I bought it a year and a half ago it had sat for about 10 years unused. I hope to get a few more years out of it before I tackle building another one. Again thanks for the inspiration. The picture is the first run after I went through it and repainted. And yes it is coal fired right now.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Oct 15th, 2008, 6:57pm

 
 
   Ray, my Friend,
 
   When do we see some of the latest work of Tommy the Turtle, heh,heh,heh.
 
   Seriously, do we have any update pics on this very major project. I know I and a quite a few others are interested to see how its going along.  
 
   I sure don't have the abilities to post a pic of my Atlantic boiler next to a pic of your Mike boiler, but I think that would be quite a comparison photo, for sure.
 
   Unuseual to to have this much photo coverage of two boilers being build from scratch at the same time on this site or any other site for that matter.
 
   Thanks for your continued photo coverage,
 
   Bruce
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Oct 15th, 2008, 7:50pm
hi all,
 
ray:  i can't add enough extra adjectives to what's already been said to express my appreciation, but thank you, thank you, thank you!  i'm learning sooooo much about boilers that i otherwise wouldn't have the opportunity to see.  between the mike and the atlantic, there's been more about boilers than just the finished project.  other boards talk about it, some individuals show some of the steps, but the railfan gang sticks it all out for all to see and learn from.  i can't thank the two of you enough.
 
bruce:  get with ray about what pictures you want to show...i'll put them in the same post.  maybe not side-by-side, but certainly atop one another to show comparison/contrast.  on second thought, once you two have decided on the photos, send them to me.  i'll meld them into a single side-by-side photo that you both can comment on.
 
to all:  it's been a long day (3:15 am to 19:00), my schedule has changed slighty to accomodate a seriously ill fellow worker.  i'll be in and out for the next few days.  after that, it's back at it hard and heavy.
 
moose
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Oct 15th, 2008, 8:13pm

 
   George,
 
   Thanks for the very kind offer. Ray and I talk to each other almost every week, so it should'nt be a problem finding pics for a comparison photo.  
   Just for kicks and chuckles, Ray's boiler is already hanging on a farm tractor bucket. Mine can be picked up with an automobile engine picker uper. Thats a huge difference right there.
 
   Bruce
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Oct 15th, 2008, 8:52pm
Bruce and Ray,
IIRC, a 426 Hemi, long block ran about 650lb., A FE Ford, about the same..... Been a while since I folded up a cherry picker. Mine's good for 2t. (a little spooky, though, 'cause they are Chinese tons!!)
 
Greg B.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 15th, 2008, 10:07pm
Bruce    here is the latest from tommy the turtle boiler works.   I finally finished welding the mud ring in last night.  With 3/4 mud ring material and beveled, it took several passes to fill it in.    The next step will be the backhead.   I still need to locate and drill the dry tube holes, and  bevel the backhead sheet.   The backhead sheet is too big and I need to trim about 3/4" off of the top.  I hope to get this done tomorrow.  then weld the backhead on and turn my attention to the front flue sheet . Not much left to do , and then I will  roll the tubes in.  these next pics will show the mud ring welds, and a test fit of the backhead sheet.  Thankyou George,   glad you are gaining something from this.  It's been fun explaining , my project.     Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 15th, 2008, 10:10pm
this pic shows the mud ring with 1 pass or part of 1 left to do.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 15th, 2008, 10:18pm
Greg,  earlier I had said the weight would be 360#, but forgot to factor in the mud ring , staybolts, girders ,and the welding rods .  I bet it will be closer to 390# .   A cherry picker would be nice, my buddy offered to loan me his,  and I might  borrow it .  The tractor does a good job , but the cherry picker would have  better control while fitting to the chassis.  This pic is looking back with the mudring complete,except for the backhead.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 15th, 2008, 10:20pm
next pic shows a close up of the mudring welds on fireman side
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 15th, 2008, 10:21pm
here is a close up of eng side
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 15th, 2008, 10:23pm
this pic shows the test fit of backhead.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 15th, 2008, 10:24pm
pic shows close up of backhead sheet .  I still need to bevel this sheet including the firedoor opening.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 15th, 2008, 10:26pm
pic is looking in the firebox at the backhead sheet.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 15th, 2008, 10:28pm
last pic for tonight, looking at the backhead with sheet removed.
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Oct 16th, 2008, 8:15am
Ray,
That's beautiful. A nice looking fabrication is as much art as it is science. You've got the eye, you've got the touch and you've got the science hammered.
 
I feel the need to add a cautionary note, for those who may not be familiar. We have mentioned a tool, here, rather casually. The engine hoist/cherry picker. These are single acting hydraulic units (Pump up, gravity down) and, when you crack that valve, there is a damned fine line between "lowered" and "dropped". If you are not familiar with the use of this very handy tool, don't make a cherished project your first effort. Good alternatives are chain falls or QUALITY come alongs.
 
Thanks for the use of the soapbox, Ray.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 7th, 2008, 6:38pm
Greg,  good point about the cherry picker , a slow response on my part for sure.    the cherry picker is a great tool , but  like greg said , with a heavy object on there , a slight opening of the valve , is all that is needed to lower your project.  Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 7th, 2008, 6:48pm
I have several pics to show you ,  work on the boiler has been slow lately.  The last few days I have found some boiler time .  This first pic shows me grinding the last  plate on the boiler that needed to be beveled.  The backhead is now beveled , I also located ,drilled and countersunk the dry tube holes.  The backhead is now on the boiler with the first pass  complete.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Nov 7th, 2008, 7:12pm

 
   Of course, my boiler is not near as heavy as what Ray's is, but we sure did have to be "gentle" with the down valve even with mine on the engine lift.
 
    BTW,,Tommy, have we made any head way of late !!!heh,heh,heh.
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Nov 7th, 2008, 8:00pm
Man, those are sure pretty gauntlets. Almost a shame to get 'em dirty workin' in a steam engine!
 
It's great to hear that you're making progress, Ray. I get it through the grapevine that the other end of that train is getting closer, too.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 7th, 2008, 10:41pm
Bruce, either one of our boilers would get your attention hanging from a cherry picker.  this next set of pics is the latest from TTBW.    Greg , the gloves are new ,  can you think of a better project to break them in on?   first pic , is test fit of backhead after getting beveled.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 7th, 2008, 10:42pm
diff angle of test fit
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 7th, 2008, 10:49pm
countersinking the drytube holes
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 7th, 2008, 10:50pm
backhead on boiler with staybolts , ready to tackweld
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 7th, 2008, 10:52pm
tackwelds on backhead
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 7th, 2008, 10:55pm
boiler repositioned,so I can roll it back and forth to allow for the best welding position.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 7th, 2008, 10:56pm
close up of boiler on it's side
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 7th, 2008, 10:57pm
start of 1st pass
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 7th, 2008, 10:58pm
diff view on side for welding
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 7th, 2008, 10:59pm
on side with weld
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 7th, 2008, 10:59pm
close up of firemans side with 1st pass
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 7th, 2008, 11:00pm
welding bottom of backhead
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 7th, 2008, 11:01pm
closeup bottom of backhead
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 7th, 2008, 11:02pm
closeup 1st pass on top and start of fire door welds
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 7th, 2008, 11:03pm
last pic for tonight, 1st pass on top of backhead
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Nov 8th, 2008, 6:41am

 
 
   NICE, very nice!!!
Posted by: Ollie Posted on: Nov 8th, 2008, 3:39pm
I already smell smoke  
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Nov 8th, 2008, 5:16pm
Ollie,
That's just the "new" burning off those gauntlets!
 
Lookin' sweet, Ray.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Nov 26th, 2008, 9:42am
Ray, how close are you to finally mounting the boiler onto the frame? It shouldn't be too much longer. Any new updates or are you planning on just surprising us in Feb?
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 26th, 2008, 7:28pm
Thanks guys.   Bobby I have been chipping away at the boiler ,  this last little bit seems to be taking forever.  Work has been busy .   I will change jobs , Dec 8th.    Going to the extra board, this should allow me some time to work on the engine.   I will  post  a few pics in the next cpl of days.   Ray III
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Dec 3rd, 2008, 8:11pm

 
   Ray,
 
   I think Greg would agree with me whan I say that i like the looks of that back head and the way you have it welded to the outside sheets and boiler top.
 
   Bruce
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 8th, 2008, 9:49pm
The progress reports should come a little faster now.   the extra board has  more down time than the pool turn or chaingang  assignment  I was on.   The next set of pics are of the backhead.  The backhead welding is complete except for a few passes on the firedoor.  That should take about an hour to complete.  There is only about  30 min of welding, the rest of the time  is for  repositioning the boiler for welding.  I had a close call a few weeks ago, hence the  welding jack now being used under the firebox .  This first pic is of the bottom of the backhead showing these passes complete.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 8th, 2008, 9:51pm
this  is a closer view of the last pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 8th, 2008, 9:53pm
different angle of bottom backhead welds
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 8th, 2008, 9:54pm
pic shows some of the passes on the top of the backhead
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 8th, 2008, 9:55pm
closer view of last pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 8th, 2008, 9:57pm
close-up fireman side backhead welds.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 8th, 2008, 9:57pm
different angle of last pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 8th, 2008, 9:59pm
pic shows boiler on it's side looking at the bottom of the firebox, with welding stand in place for  support.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 8th, 2008, 10:00pm
pic shows backhead welding complete eng side
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 8th, 2008, 10:02pm
another view , close up bottom of backheadcomplete.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 8th, 2008, 10:03pm
pic shows boiler straddling engine stand.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 8th, 2008, 10:06pm
Last pic for tonight,  same as last pic with front of mike in pic.   Thats 350 pounds balanced  on the stand.
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Dec 9th, 2008, 6:42am
Ray, we are all getting excited as school kids anticipating the coming of Christmas morning. I am so looking forward to seeing the boiler mated to the chassis.
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Dec 9th, 2008, 7:08am
A thing of beauty, Ray. Absolutely a thing of beauty. Your craftsmanship is beyond reproach.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 9th, 2008, 8:51am
Bobby, so am I.   I hope to have the welding finished in the next week.  All that is left,  front tube sheet , dry tubes, and 4 staybolts on the backhead. Thats not much.  Still alot of work to have it running, but I am going to try my best to have it running  in feb.  Not running in feb, does not seem like an option to me.   Greg thankyou,  I hope you can shovel some coal into  it in feb.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Dec 9th, 2008, 8:06pm

 
   Ray,
 
   That is some real nice work, for sure. Like Bobby, I can't wait to see that brute in one piece.
 
   Bruce
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 10th, 2008, 10:00pm
The welding around the firedoor  was completed today.  With the firedoor finished  I needed to move the boiler,  so my neighbor came over and helped me reposition the boiler.  I hope to start welding the front tube sheet in tomorrow.   This next set of pics will show todays progress.  Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 10th, 2008, 10:43pm
first pic close up of firedoor.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 10th, 2008, 10:46pm
next pic same as last without a flash.  the different light shows different features.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 10th, 2008, 10:48pm
similar to the last  2 pics , at a diff angle.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 10th, 2008, 10:51pm
welding the corner.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 10th, 2008, 10:52pm
close up of corner weld.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 10th, 2008, 10:53pm
welding jack , helping support the boiler.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Dec 10th, 2008, 10:54pm

 
   Dear friend, does that thing take three men and a boy to move I can't believe how heavy it appears in the pics. I'm sure it is in real life too.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 10th, 2008, 10:55pm
looking in the firedoor, completed.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 10th, 2008, 10:57pm
The boiler, after my neighbor and I repositioned it.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 10th, 2008, 10:58pm
same as last pic w/o the flash.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Dec 10th, 2008, 11:00pm

 
   Ray,
 
   For those of us on this LIVE STEAM forum that DON'T thing live steam is dying, can you let us know what the dimensions of the grate are. I'm sure some here would find that interesting. I know I would!
 
   Bruce
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 10th, 2008, 11:00pm
pic is a little blurry, but a look from inside the firebox at the finished  firedoor
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 10th, 2008, 11:06pm
Bruce, the grate area is 9 1/2" wide  X 15" long. The raritan's grate area is  only 4X6.  The last pic for tonight is a pic of the boiler repositioned and ready for the front tube sheet .   Tomorrow I will reinsert the  three 1" rods  between the rear tube sheet and front tube sheet, make sure the 2 sheets are aligned and tack weld the front  tube sheet. Then I will stand the boiler on end and weld the front tube sheet.   Ray III
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Dec 10th, 2008, 11:22pm
Ray from that last photo, it looks like you could stick the entire boiler from the Raritan inside the firebox of the Mike!
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 10th, 2008, 11:23pm
Bruce, as for moving it around it is all 2 guys want .  I believe it is around 350# now .  The copper tubes alone are almost 50#, once they are in and the dry tubes.  It should weigh a little over  400# when complete.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 10th, 2008, 11:24pm
Bobby ,  LOL.    It's like the  mike is saying, get in my belly. LOL
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 15th, 2008, 8:05pm
I have not worked on the boiler in a couple of days.   I discovered the copper tubes were .003 larger than the tube holes.  I ordered an expandable reamer, which arrived today.  In the meantime  I  decided to work on the reverse quadrant .  It was awful tempting to order a completed one from a supplier.  Now that I am on the extra board with some spare time , and the castings and the prints required ,came with the engine, I decided to give it a try.   So I oiled the lathe and bought the required hardware.  I do not have a mill, so the radius and teeth for the reverse were cut on the band saw.  The brass spacers, and a pin that was  pressed into the bottom of the reverse rod were made on the lathe.  I bought the bronze handle from a supplier.  It would have been nice to buy the reverser already completed , but it feels so much better when you do it your self.  These next pics  will show the finished  reverser. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 15th, 2008, 8:06pm
the next few pics are diff views.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 15th, 2008, 8:07pm
another view
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 15th, 2008, 8:08pm
close up of handle , which is a little blurry.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 15th, 2008, 8:09pm
last pic for tonight.  It will be back to the boiler now that I have the reamer.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Dec 15th, 2008, 9:17pm
Very, very nice, indeed.  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Dec 15th, 2008, 10:28pm
I have to agree with Bruce, on this one. Very nice, especially when one considers the lack of a mill and rotary table. Ya done good, Ray.
 
Does "extra board" still mean "married to the phone"?
 
Greg B.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 15th, 2008, 11:25pm
Thanks Bruce and Greg.    Greg  yes I am still tied to the phone.  The extra board I'm on protects 3 terminals, but most work is from just 1 terminal.  The board is set up in 2 week blocks , I protect the board 6 days the first week and 5 the second week  24/7.
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Dec 16th, 2008, 1:53pm
Ray,
Really nice work on the reverse.  By the way, I recently bought a 1916 Locomotive Dictionary on ebay, and it has a drawing of the throttle lever for an IC mikado.  If you want I can send you a copy.
Dan
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 16th, 2008, 3:01pm
Thank you Dan.    Dan after reading your post, I looked at the 1919 locomotive dictionary that  I have here.   It has a drawing for the  I.C. mike throttle as well. Thank you for the offer and  the information. Ray III.
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Dec 16th, 2008, 3:24pm
hi all,
 
ray: book got here yesterday!  WAHOO! it's fantastic!  can't thank you enough, reference materials are where ya find them...many, many thanks for thinking of me!
 
btw...new 'puter should be here tomorrow!
 
moose
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 16th, 2008, 3:34pm
Goerge , you are quite welcome.  Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 27th, 2008, 6:47pm
The  adjustable hand reamer arrived , but was not the right tool for the job.  So I ordered another  reamer,   1.0039 , this did the trick, since the tubes are 1.003.   The sheets are reamed and the front sheet was tack welded in today.  While I was waiting for the 2nd reamer to arrive, I marked and drilled the holes for the fake rivets on the smoke box.  I will use drive screws on those .  I will post pics tomorrow.   Ray III
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Dec 27th, 2008, 7:44pm

 
   Man, I can hardly wait to see that monster on the chasis. AND, fired up at the un-meet.
 
   Br.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 27th, 2008, 11:49pm
first pic ,smoke box with  the rivet detail ready for the drill press.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 27th, 2008, 11:51pm
next pic shows the  level in the firebox , checking front and rear sheet alignment.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 27th, 2008, 11:54pm
pic shows the front sheet in place and ready for the level.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 27th, 2008, 11:55pm
level on the front tube sheet.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 27th, 2008, 11:56pm
close up of last pic.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 28th, 2008, 12:04am
This is the last pic for tonight.  Showing the spot welds on the front tube sheet.   The shiney area on the barrel I.D. around the tube sheet was ground clean to allow for a good welding surface.  I have some help lined up  tomorrow to lift the boiler off of the stand, so I can stand it up on end and weld the front tube sheet in,  I will also weld the dry tubes  and front supply line at this time.  Ray III
Posted by: Alcosteam Posted on: Dec 28th, 2008, 1:55am
 Hey Ray,, does that mean you are going to be ready for rolling tubes and a hydro soon?  Should we get the hydro pump ready?  
 
tim  
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 28th, 2008, 9:06am
Yes Tim I am going to bring it up there , in the next couple of weeks for the hydro .
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Dec 28th, 2008, 10:54am

 
   Ray,
 
   It certainly was good to see those sheets in. Glad you got the reamer to do the job for you. You did that sort of fast after our last phone conversation.  
 
   I guess I've turned into the "new" turtle now here in the SE. Heh,heh,heh.
 
   PS, Got lots of coal to burn!!!
 
   Bruce
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 28th, 2008, 9:00pm
Bruce,  I hope to make a trip to Narrows myself, before the unmeet.  If I don't, I might need to try your coal.   Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 28th, 2008, 9:27pm
With help from my daughters boyfriend and the tractor, we  lifted the boiler off the stand and stood it on end this morning.  The first pass is complete on the front tube sheet with the second pass started, also  the first pass is complete on the front supply line.  I hope to finish the welding tomorrow. This first pic shows the boiler on end,  with the shop light on it to warm the metal a bit before welding.  The garage is insulated and heated while I am working out there, but the metal is still  pretty cool.  It was 31 degrees [out side of course] this morning. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 28th, 2008, 9:31pm
Same as last pic with garage door open for a different light.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 28th, 2008, 9:38pm
pic shows first pass almost 1/2 way around.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 28th, 2008, 9:41pm
close up of first pass.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 28th, 2008, 9:43pm
Last pic for tonight.  first pass complete on front tube sheet, and supply line , with the second pass on tube sheet started.   hope to finish this tomorrow. Ray III
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Dec 28th, 2008, 11:33pm
awesome! ok so I am running out of adjectives.  
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Dec 29th, 2008, 9:11am
Looking good, Ray.
 
Technical question: In the construction of our hobby boilers, are the welds stress relieved?
 
Greg B.
Posted by: Ollie Posted on: Dec 29th, 2008, 12:11pm
Purdy   : seriously you are one of the best welders I know keep up the good work  
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 29th, 2008, 8:16pm
Bobby ,thanks, I will be glad when the boiler is done and can move on to the next  project.     Greg,  I can only comment on my personal experiences.   I have built four 1 1/2" scale boilers including the mike boiler.   None of them were stress relieved.  One of those boilers , the raritan is on it's 17th year of operation.   In my 28 years in this hobby, and having met and  gotten to know many experienced builders in several states.  I can not think of anyone  stress relieving their boilers.  Thats not to say it has not been done , those are just my experiences.   Ollie  thanks and I am glad you are enjoying the project. As for the welding.  I had not tig welded in 20 years prior to starting the mikado boiler.   There were many practice passes on scrap metal before I ran the first pass on any boiler parts.  To run nice passes you have to know the basics and then practice them often.  If not you get rusty, you never forget the basics , but you sure get rusty.  It's all about repetition, as the project has gone along, I have noticed my beads are more consistant .  Now the torch angle , the rod angle,  the distance between tungsten and the work, and  forward  speed , seem to take less concentration .  You still have to concentrate but your hands become trained .    Ray III
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Dec 30th, 2008, 5:06pm
Thanks Ray. The question just popped into my head and was one that I had never seen addressed on any of the boards I haunt..... Even the ones populated by "experts".
 
Greg B.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Dec 30th, 2008, 6:20pm

 
   Ray,
 
   Like so many other of our friends here, I also have run clean out of complimentry adjectives to describe your workmanship. I'm just happy for you to see it all coming together.  
 
   Can't wait to see that brute running at the un-meet.
 
   Happy New Year to you and yours,
 
   Bruce
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Dec 31st, 2008, 10:25am
on Dec 30th, 2008, 5:06pm, pockets wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Thanks Ray. The question just popped into my head and was one that I had never seen addressed on any of the boards I haunt..... Even the ones populated by "experts".Greg B.

Pockets & Ray,   Maybe it has to due with the size as the new boiler built by Boothbay for the WW&F #9 has gone to be stress relieved.  My new bolier built by Marty Knox didn't.  Interesting comment.
 
Tom C.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 31st, 2008, 11:37am
Greg, that was a great question.   There is always something to learn.   Tom C.,  what size is the WW&F #9 boiler.    Bruce ,  I am looking forward to it running down there too.    Happy New Year to you and  everyone on these boards.  Ray III
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Dec 31st, 2008, 12:01pm
Ray,
It was a general question. Not aimed at any particular boiler. It occured to me that, given the variety of shapes and sections used in these fabrications, that the internal stresses must be horrific. I'm totally prepared to be wrong on this. I've done enough metal work to know that logic doesn't always apply. I do know that a copper boiler is considered to be in an annealed state, therefore stress relieved, on completion. I wonder if that applies to steel? No, that wouldn't be right, because welding steel generates and locks in stresses.....
 
An interesting experiment, given the resources to trash a new boiler, would be to put one in a 600*F oven for about twelve hours and see what comes out. I don't believe a coal fire, in the firebox, qualifies. It's too localized. The rest of the boiler is full of boiling water and approximately 350* steam. Therefore much cooler and giving inconsistant heat.
 
Shoulda stayed in bed.....!
 
Greg B.
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Dec 31st, 2008, 7:11pm
on Dec 31st, 2008, 11:37am, SteamHeaton wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Greg, that was a great question.   There is always something to learn.   Tom C.,  what size is the WW&F #9 boiler.    Ray III

 
Ray,  I don't know the size but it is for a 2 foot gauge loco.  I will see if I can find any info on the WW&F web site and get back to you.
 
Tom C.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 1st, 2009, 7:26pm
More progress was made on the front tube sheet yesterday.  There will be a total of 4 passes on the front  sheet.    I am half way around on the last pass  now.   The bottom tube holes were  closer to the bottom of the barrel than I would have liked.  Hindsight, I would have raised the tube nest 3/8ths of an inch, and allow more material at the bottom.  While welding ,the bottom of the bottom holes were slightly  undercut.   To fix this I  put an extra pass on the bottom of those holes.  I will grind  most of the bead away them reream those holes.  The supply line needs one more pass.  Then install the 2 dry pipes and weld.  After that I will flip the boiler over , weld the dry pipes and  4 stays .  Then welding will be complete.   the next set of pics will show the extra passes on the bottom holes and welding the front sheet.    Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 1st, 2009, 7:27pm
pic of 2nd pass complete.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 1st, 2009, 7:30pm
pic of 3rd pass
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 1st, 2009, 7:31pm
making sure everything is clean for the last pass.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 1st, 2009, 7:33pm
getting ready to weld.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 1st, 2009, 7:34pm
starting to weld
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 1st, 2009, 7:36pm
welding
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 1st, 2009, 7:37pm
same as last pic with flash off for different effect.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 1st, 2009, 7:41pm
close up of 4th pass.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 1st, 2009, 7:42pm
last pic for tonight. even closer than the last. Ray III
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Jan 2nd, 2009, 11:23am
on Dec 29th, 2008, 9:11am, pockets wrote:       (Click here for original message)

Technical question: In the construction of our hobby boilers, are the welds stress relieved?
 
Greg B.

 
Greg,  
I don't consider myself as an authority on this subject, but based on my recollection of discussions from a commercial boiler builder, there is a distinction between a "miniature" boiler and a "power" boiler.  Most of our boilers fit into the miniature category, which means they don't exceed 5 cubic feet volume, 16" shell diameter, and a certain max. pressure (either 100 or 125 psi, can't remember for sure).  Power boilers require stress relieving, while miniature boilers don't.  On a miniature boiler, the stresses tend to work themselves out over a period of time.  Probably the two foot gauge boiler is too big to fit the miniature definition, which is why it is stress relieved.
Dan
 
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Jan 2nd, 2009, 11:45am
Thanks, Dan. That makes a lot of sense.  
 
The range of skills and knowledge in this hobby is mind boggling. It seems that, no matter the seeming weirdness of a question, if you just keep asking sooner or later, someone has the answer. Frequently they have the "why", as well.
 
Thanks again,
Greg B.
Posted by: Bruce_Mowbray Posted on: Jan 2nd, 2009, 1:37pm
on Jan 2nd, 2009, 11:23am, Dan Watson wrote:       (Click here for original message)

 
Probably the two foot gauge boiler is too big to fit the miniature definition, which is why it is stress relieved.
Dan
 

 
Only the welds on unstayed surfaces need to be stress relieved. (ASTM ASME rule) With the small sized welded boiler of the 2 foot gauge engine, it may just be easier to stick the whole thing into the oven than go over each weld individually. It takes time and special heating equipment to stress relieve all of the welds that make up a welded boiler.  
 
 
Bruce Mowbray
Springville, PA
http://www.geocities.com/trainhead391/
 
 
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Jan 2nd, 2009, 3:41pm

   Ray,
 
   In an attempt to get this thread back on the topic of YOUR boiler build, I was wondering how difficult it will be to clear those bores in the front sheet, in order to slide your tubes through. From my own LIMITED expierience of rolling a FEW tubes in the last almost forty years in this hobby, once those holes are clear, I really don't see any problem with rolling your tubes in. Just my humble opinion.
 
   Guys,
 
   For those that want to discuss the heat treating of a welded boiler, might I suggest starting a completely different thread dedicated to that topic.  
 
   Your PITA moderator,
 
   Bruce
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 2nd, 2009, 5:09pm
Bruce,  The four holes will only need minimal grinding, before I ream them. I finished welding the front sheet last night. I should have the dry pipes in by tomorrow.   Then insert the flues. Ray III
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Jan 3rd, 2009, 9:07am
I apologize for pulling this thread "Off Topic". I asked what I thought was a valid question of my instructor, Ray. I thought this was more than "show and tell". I thought we were here to teach and learn.
 
My humble appologies,
Greg B.
Posted by: Bruce_Mowbray Posted on: Jan 3rd, 2009, 4:12pm
I also thought the question and answer were right on topic with what was being done. My apologies as well.  
 
BTW, Awesome job Ray. It has inspired me to looking into buying a TIG machine.
 
(another) Bruce
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Jan 3rd, 2009, 8:05pm
OT: Bruce M. it is nice to see you on Rail Fan. Maybe you could grace us with a thread on your layouts progress?  
 
Bobby
 
AKA: Ishkabibble001 (Yahoo Live Diesel)
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Jan 3rd, 2009, 9:02pm

 
   Greg, Bruce M.,
   
 
   If an appology is in order, perhaps its mine. I am very sincere when I say that the heat treating subject would be very interesting in and of itself.  
I've seen how easily we all drift off topic here and other places, hence the suggestion of staying with the subject of Ray's build and not getting all involved in a discussion on stress relieving a boiler in detail in this thread.
And, if there is any question about my interest in building a boiler, take a look at the thread pertaining to my own boiler build.  
 
   I, in particular am very interested in metalurgy. And I come by this interest honestly. My grandfather and my name sake, was a file hardening shop forman for none other than the Nicolson File Co. a long time ago.
 
 
   BTW, Bruce, its been a long time since we've seen or spoken to each other. If you can, try to get down here for the un-meet. It would be great to see you again.
 
   Bruce
Posted by: Southern_PS4 Posted on: Jan 5th, 2009, 1:56am
Bruce and Ray,
 
I have 3 questions, actually 2 questions and a comment which I hope is not too far off topic.
Ray, how did you get the argon gas to the back of the root welds on the backhead?  There are several ways to do it on most of the other welds.  I would think that maybe you used stick for the root and Tig for the balance of the weld.  Second, there appears to be a considerable un-stayed space on either side of the stay below the fire hole.  I would think that if a stay was required below the fire hole that the two spaces on either side would need one as well.
 
Suggestion:  on the engine hoist hydraulic line from the pump to the cylinder, install a flow control valve, or needle valve, and put a check valve in parallel with it so that there is free flow from the pump to the cylinder but no flow through it back to the pump.  That would force the fluid to return to the pump through the needle valve which you could adjust for a nice SLOW movement of the hoist in the down direction.
 
Hope I wasn't too long winded.  Ray I absolutely love your pics and descriptions.  I have been trying to visualize the joint were the boiler barrel, throte plate and fire box side plate come together for a long time. Thank you!
 
Jerry
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 5th, 2009, 11:56am
Greg & Bruce M.  there is no need to apologize.   It was a great question,  the only answer I could give you was one of my personal experiences.  It was a general question ,  I  only commented on the boilers that I have built.  Those were the ones I have personal knowlege of.  The reference material  I use as a guide , does not mention it [stress relieving].   This thread is here because Bruce R.  suggested I do it.  If he had not , the boiler would , still have been built . There just would not have been any reporting of the build.   All questions and comments are welcome.   We all learn from each other  here.  That is why I have spent the time posting the pics and comments.  There is a fair amount of time  in that alone.  It was all done in the hopes of helping anyone considering building there own boiler and were not sure what it entailed.               Jerry , I am glad you are enjoying the build.   As for your comment on the backing gas.   I don't believe it is necessary with steel.   I have read about backing gas, when welding stainless, and titanium,  both of which I have never done.   For the root pass  tig or stick   both do a great job.   stick welding is a quicker process , but requires more cleaning ,between  passes.    Regarding the question of  sufficient  number of staybolts.    I followed the print on staybolt spacing.  You must remember there  is  3/4" square  stock around the fire door and mud ring, which is welded to both plates.  That is a stay in it's self.   Also we are talking about  a distance of   1 & 1/2" to 2" total  space between  the square stock of the firedoor and mud ring.   The print called for  1/4 and  5/16 material .  This entire boiler is made from 3/8th boiler plate.  I probably could have omitted the backhead staybolts all together.   We are talking about  3/8th plates and  140psi.   These boilers are so over built.   Hope this helps.  Jerry any question you might have, please don't hesitate to ask. Ray III
Posted by: Southern_PS4 Posted on: Jan 5th, 2009, 1:49pm
Ray,
 
1-1/2 to 2 inches!  It's hard to judge dimensions in your beautiful  pictures.  I'm now surprised that you put it in.
Any comments on the hoist mod? I'd hate to see anyone drop that boiler on their toe!  Even Bruce's boiler s too heavy for that.
Look forward to seeing it finished.
 
Jerry
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Jan 7th, 2009, 11:42pm

 
   Jerry,
 
   Your quite correct about the valves in the engine lift. Don't know if you are aware that there are a few us here that have been mechanics for more years than some of us like to think about.(myself just two years short of fifty) That being said, I have done exactly what you suggested, years ago. I installed an adjustable limiter valve in a bypass line to the reserve tank to nicely control the decent of just such a lift. It made lift less exciting when lowering engines, believe me.  
   And you are also correct about my boiler. I tried walking it around in Pete's welding shop. It damn near walked me around.
 
   Ray,
 
   I sure was glad to hear of your advances with the sheets and the tubes.
Your phone calls always put a new light on this very energentic build of yours. I sure hope you have her ready to fire for the Un-Meet!!!
Please keep us updated on this most interesting boiler build. Between your descriptions and the pics, that is what makes this live steam thread so interesting. Without the bull crap, the bla-bla, and the flame wars that one finds in other places.
 
   Bruce
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 2:41am
My last  update pics were on the 1st.  Since then I welded the dry pipes , the last 4 stay bolts, the firedoor base to the boiler, installed the tubes, painted the boiler, rolled the tubes in ,  and tested it on 130 psi air with soapy water.   No leaks were found.   I am  taking the boiler to Dawson Illinois, for the hydro, and to see my live steam friends in Decatur.   I will also  get some help milling a few parts for the engine as I do not have a mill.  It  sure feels good to have the boiler done.   It certainly  took longer than I thought it would.  20 months start to finish ,  of those 20 months, 5 were non productive.   Nov , Dec, Jan  of last year I took a break due to boiler burnout.   About the time I was ready to start again, the  C.N. offered me an opportunity I could not pass up.  Borrow out on the DWP railroad for  7 weeks.   The boiler project started again in april.   Tonight I finished this part of the build.  One step closer to having it running.     Ray III  
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 2:54am
first pic on the way to the finsh line of the boiler build, shows the first pass on the 1st dry pipe.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 2:55am
1st pass complete on 1st dry tube.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 2:56am
3rd and final pass.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 2:57am
both dry pipes complete on front sheet.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 2:58am
boiler standing on end to weld dry pipes on backhead, and last 4 staybolts.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 2:59am
starting to weld on all dry pipes and stays.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:00am
1st pass complete.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:01am
backhead welding done.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:07am
this next pic shows a base for the fire door.  The print called for you to tap into the backhead.   I did not want to do this.  Instead  I made a base plate  out of 1/4 x 3/4 flat bar.  The same size as the fire door frame. I drilled 4 holes ,one in each corner , for an 8-32 sliding fit.  Then I drilled from the backside with a larger drill bit, just  enough to countersink the head of the 8-32button head screw.  I tack welded them on the back side. This gave me a stud on the front to attach the firedoor frame to.  
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:09am
fire door frame on the base plate.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:10am
test fit of door.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:12am
pic of fire door assembled and ready for the boiler.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:13am
with peep hole open.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:14am
door open.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:23am
This next pic shows the boiler  in the tractor bucket.  The stays on the inside of the backhead were all the welding that remained.  To weld this in a flat position I needed to get the boiler  vertical and elevated.  we put it in the bucket and raised it high enough for me to get a chair  under it  to sit and weld.  The only problem was an outside temp of 31 degrees and windy.  With the heat on in the garage and the shop light on the boiler to heat it up before welding,  I started.    I lowered  the garage door as far as I could, to keep the heat in.  My feet were cold though.  Like being on both sides of the moon at the same time hot and cold.  As soon as the welding was done the garage door was closed.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:23am
close up of last 4 stays to get welded.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:24am
stays welded.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:26am
pic shows 21   1"copper  tubes cut to 35"
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:27am
1st row of tubes in
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:28am
inside view of 1st row.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:29am
different angle of last pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:30am
mikado tube is as long as the raritan.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:30am
most of the tubes are in.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:31am
firebox view.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:32am
installing the last tube.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:33am
last tube starting in.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:34am
1/2 way in.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:35am
almost there.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:36am
tapping it in to proper spot.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:36am
close up of last pic.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:37am
all the tubes are in and ready for the roller.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:40am
the boiler received a coat of 500 degree semi gloss black engine paint with ceramic.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:40am
another pic of boiler painted.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:41am
front sheet with paint
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:42am
one last paint pic.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:44am
it took 3 of us to get the boiler back on the stand and in position to roll the tubes on the firebox end.  Probably weighs close to 400# now.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:44am
another look at the firedoor base.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:45am
firebox view of all  the tubes in.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:49am
the left side of this pic shows the 3/8ths square drive  end of the roller. In the middle is the adapter I made.   It was a short  3/8ths extension that I cut , only using the female end.  Then I cut the head off of a bolt and tig welded them together.  Then you can see the ratchet I used to drive the roller.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:52am
pic shows the ratchet in the firebox, this is how I was going to bust every one of my knuckles , then while talking to Bruce R  he suggested a universal and another extension, to get outside of the firebox.  What a great idea. Thanks Bruce.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:53am
this pic shows the revised method of rolling tubes in the firebox and the roller that was  loaned to me by Tim J  [alco steam]. The yellow stuff is tube roller lube.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:55am
pic of roller in action
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:56am
close up of roller with 3 tubes  to roll.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:57am
all the tubes are now rolled , you see them plugged here with paper towel and redy for paint.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 3:59am
after the paint dried. I put air pressure in the boiler. Started with 60 psi the  105 then 130.  The pic shows 105 on the gauge.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 4:01am
pic shows soapy water being sprayed on the tubes while under pressure to look for leaks.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 4:03am
max pressure was 130psi and no leaks were found .  I did have a couple of pipe plugs leaking air due to the fact that I did not  use any teflon tape. I will before the hydro, on saturday.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 4:04am
front sheet with soap and no leaks were found.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 4:05am
ready to load up and take to Dawson IL. on sat. for the hydro.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 4:09am
The last pic for tonight is actually the first pic  that I posted ,of this project. It's me standing there looking at the boiler tube, getting ready to layout the lines for the first cut.   May 20th 2007 to Jan 09 2009.  I.C. Mikado boiler build.   Ray III
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 7:11am

   Ray,
 
   First of all, those are some awsome pictures. Your workmanship is second to none. Thanks for shareing this expierience with all of us that are "truely" interested in what others are accomplishing in the live steam hobby.
 
   Secondly, after all of the years that we have been close friends, I had no doubt that this boiler project would end up with such great success.
 
   Now, its getting closer to fire up time. And with just a tad of luck, running at the "09" Un-Meet at the BCRR.
 
   Thanks again for this wonderful trip with you through this build.
 
   Bruce
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Jan 9th, 2009, 7:36am
Ray,  
Not only is that the stoutest built boiler I have ever seen it is by far the prettiest! The level of attention to detail you have done makes me really look forward to the finished locomotive. Well done!  
 
Bobby
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 11th, 2009, 1:11am
Thankyou Bruce and  thankyou Bobby.    Yes Bruce with a little luck  we will see the mike and a caboose together at unmeet 09 ,with all of our friends for a time to remember.     This has been fun explaining my way through the boiler build.     Today I took the boiler to Dawson IL, for the hydro.  it was great to see  all of my friends again.  They get together every sat to work on there projects together.   I was there most saturdays back when I lived closer to them.  Now it is just over 3 hours one way to see them.  So my visits are not as often .  We did the hydro as soon as we arrived, before the sun went down, and the temp dropped.   With the boiler at  400# ,we decided to hydro it in the bed of my truck.  the temp was 29 degrees with a wind  of 10-15mph.   Certainly not ideal conditions to hydro a boiler.    All pipe plugs received a wrap of teflon tape , the 300 psi gauge was attached ,as was the water line, and hand pump.   after the boiler was filled and all air removed, the city water pressure brought the boiler up to 50 psi.   Then Ed P. manning the pump brought the pressure up to 300 psi.   Then Kenny D. inspected the boiler , and did not find any leaks , after 20 mins.   The water that spilled in the bed of my truck, while bleeding the boiler of air was already frozen by the time we finished the hydro.   These pics will show what I just described.   Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 11th, 2009, 1:33am
1st pic , boiler in the bed of my truck getting ready for the hydro.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 11th, 2009, 1:35am
this pic shows Kenny D. in his proper attire for a Jan 10th hydro.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 11th, 2009, 1:36am
yours truly just before the hydro.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 11th, 2009, 1:37am
almost 50 psi  on the gauge from city water pressure.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 11th, 2009, 1:39am
ready to start pumping, notice the puddle behind the pump handle in the parking lot is frozen.  LOL
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 11th, 2009, 1:42am
Ed P. on the pump.   Ed is their in house welder , and builder of many boilers and locomotives, including the boiler for the 12" gauge engine.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 11th, 2009, 1:46am
last pic shows 300 psi on the gauge.  After 20 mins and not finding any leaks , we relieved the pressure and drained the water .  Then we  did not waste any time getting inside to warm up.  Ray III
Posted by: Henry Posted on: Jan 11th, 2009, 7:32am
Ray,
 
Congratulations!
 
I am looking forward to seeing it mounted on the rolling chassis!
 
Henry
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Jan 11th, 2009, 7:55am

 
   Ray, my dear old friend, I cannot say "WELL DONE" with enough enthusiasm to match this accomplishment.
 
   Bruce
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Jan 11th, 2009, 9:15am
Way to go, awsome, terrific....They all seem insufficient to describe this moment. Congratulations, Ray.
 
What's the minimum radius you can wrap that monster around? The clam Lake starts trackwork in the Spring!
 
Greg B.
Posted by: Southern_PS4 Posted on: Jan 11th, 2009, 1:54pm
Ray,
 
The closeup pics of the welds on this boiler are BEAUTIFULL!  They show amazingly beautifull welds done by a very skilled craftsman.  I've rarely seen work as nice as this and don't expect to see better, except perhaps by you.
Congratulations on a successful hydro.
I see in several pics that you had proper four legged supervision!
I look foerward to seeing the finished Loco.
 
Jerry H
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Jan 11th, 2009, 3:20pm
Ray, after watching this boiler being built and the way you built it, I had no doubts about it passing the hydro! Congrats!
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 11th, 2009, 3:52pm
Henry, thank you.   It was such a relief to have the hydro over with.   Now it's on to the smokebox and mounting brackets for the boiler.     Bruce  , thank you , a project like this is so much more fun when you can share it with friends,  and also get their input .  Like leaving the barrel material in place under the steam dome, instead of cutting it out ,  to act as a baffle,  the extra drain holes in the steam dome,  the washout plug under the front of the barrel,  and helpful hints on rolling the tubes on the firebox end were all from my friends.    Greg  thank you,  according to railroad supply, the mike can handle a 40' radius.   Jerry H. thank you   , the supervisor you referred to is an 11 year old 102# black lab, named trooper.   Bobby thank you ,  I plan on starting the smokebox tomorrow.      Ed P. and Tim J. also helped me turn the smokebox front down to the proper diameter, and remove 1/16th  from the backside for a nice clean fit against the smokebox, while in Dawson yesterday.  My 10" lathe was too small.   They have a 14" lathe , right tool for the right job.    Thanks again to everyone for the kind words, and help along the way.      Ray III
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Jan 11th, 2009, 6:54pm
hi all,
 
ray:  kind words just don't describe our elation for you.  there simply aren't enough adjectives to describe your work.  what a spectacular job!  now, when can you start on one for the mt gretna #10.....
 
 
 
moose
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 21st, 2009, 9:56pm
Thank you George,  when the mt. gretna #10 is ready for a boiler  let me know.    With the boiler now finished , work has shifted to the smokebox and grates.    All that remains to be done on the smokebox, is install the 120 drive screws to simulate the rivets, drill 4 holes to mount the stack, and 4 holes , drill and tap on front for the smokebox front.   The grates were finished today, as were the grate supports .   The next few pics will show the latest progress.  
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 21st, 2009, 10:21pm
smokebox with 20 bolts.  More than was needed ,  was done for looks.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 21st, 2009, 10:32pm
side view, with steam supply lines in place and holes layed out for the supply lines.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 21st, 2009, 10:37pm
pic shows the smokebox with exhaust nozzle and steam supply lines in place.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 21st, 2009, 10:39pm
pic shows grate fabrication.  these are made out of  1/4" x 3/4" hot roll flat bar.  If they do not hold up I will make some out of stainless.    I think they will do just fine.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 21st, 2009, 10:42pm
pic showsgrates completed. the grate is split into 3 sections , so I can get them out of the fire door if there is a problem.  You can see the spacers welded to the sides of the grates, to keep the spacing correct.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 21st, 2009, 10:47pm
pic shows the raritan grate in the middle of the mike grate.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 21st, 2009, 10:47pm
another view of the 2 grates.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 21st, 2009, 10:50pm
pic shows grate supports ready for welding to the bottom of the firebox, those are 3/8ths stainless rods  that will  hold the grates up.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 21st, 2009, 10:51pm
closer view of last pic with the flash off for a different  look.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 21st, 2009, 10:54pm
last pic for tonight and it is a little blurry, shows the spacer ring ready for welding on the front of the boiler.  This is needed because the smokebox is to print , and the boiler is smaller than print.  Ray III
Posted by: NJLS5344 Posted on: Jan 22nd, 2009, 10:03am
Ray i have a question, the boiler and grates that you have been working on so far.  who's engine is all of that stuff for.  just curious about that.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 22nd, 2009, 11:08am
NJL,  all of the parts I have been making are for an Illinois Central mikado, that I am building for myself.  The chassis was bought running on air, and since I work for the I.C. railroad ,now the CN.  I deciced to finish the locomotive as an I.C. mike.  Look back at the beginning of this thread, for a better explanation of this build.   Ray III
Posted by: NJLS5344 Posted on: Jan 22nd, 2009, 9:56pm
ohh ok, my bad.  thanks for getting back to me though
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Jan 22nd, 2009, 11:31pm

 
   Ray,
 
   As useual, your pics are awesome. The comparison between the Raritan grate and the new grates for the Mike are is really siomething. A real eye opener.
 
   thanks again for the great pics
 
   Bruce
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Feb 8th, 2009, 9:13pm
I have not posted much lately.  Every spare minute is going to the engine.  I thought I would come up for air,  so  here are  the pics showing the engine with the boiler on.   alot has been done in the last week.  It will look like a naked chicken but it will be fired up.   so here are the pics, I am heading back out to the shop.  I should have th smokebox plumbing finished tonight or tomorrow . The first pic shows the boiler ready to be lifted by the engine hoist. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Feb 8th, 2009, 9:14pm
this pic is same as last from different angle
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Feb 8th, 2009, 9:16pm
lowering into position.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Feb 8th, 2009, 9:17pm
lowering into position from different angle
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Feb 8th, 2009, 9:20pm
this pic shows the front of the boiler already in the smokebox, and my daughter lining up the holes in the rear bracket while I  operate the engine hoist.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Feb 8th, 2009, 9:22pm
pic shows boiler on the eng ,  lifting strap still on as insurance.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Feb 8th, 2009, 9:23pm
boiler bolted on and ready to removethe strap.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Feb 8th, 2009, 9:24pm
last pic for tonight, shows the grates installed , I still have to make the ash pan.  Ray III
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Feb 8th, 2009, 10:22pm

 
   A-W-E-S-O-M-E. I just can't think of anything else to say.
 
 
   Bruce
Posted by: Southern_PS4 Posted on: Feb 9th, 2009, 1:00am
Ray,
 
It’s an exciting time when the boiler and the engine come together for the first time.  Finished or not it will look good with the caboose.
 
Jerry H.
 
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Feb 9th, 2009, 7:43am
Wow, Ray, wow. That is looking great! Congrats, I think I speak for all of us down here when I say we are as excited about your progress as you are. I can't wait to see her steamed up for the first time!
Posted by: NHI_FIREMAN Posted on: Feb 17th, 2009, 11:31pm
Chrissake Ray you've really outdone yourself!  I can't wait to see some video of this thing running.  Fantastic job!
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Feb 18th, 2009, 9:07pm
Thankyou   Bruce, Jerry H., Bobby, Nhi_fireman.   Thanks to all of my friends here  for the kind words and for, helping me stay motivated , not to mention  the advice and suggestions.  Just a few days , until I leave for florida, and the engine is getting the last few items tended to , in order to have it operable.  I think the engine has logged about 6 or 7 miles on the stand in the last week.  A couple of friends from work are going to help me load the trailer tomorrow.  Ray III
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Feb 18th, 2009, 9:58pm
Ray,
Congratulations. I am truely happy for you and wish I was making the trip with you. May the teething problems be very few and easily handled.
 
Greg B.
 
PS: George is bustin' his hump gettin' that hack together!
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Feb 25th, 2009, 7:18am

 
   All I can say about this chasis/boiler combination, when seen face to face, is intimidateing. I helped Ray unload the Mike last night when he arrived at the Un-Meet, and it is a brute.
 
   I'll post some pic of this accomplishmnet in the Un-Meet of "09" thread.
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Mar 2nd, 2009, 8:21am
Ray,
 
Thank you for letting us be a part of her first fire-up! What a strong pulling engine!  
 
Ray set a bench mark of 16 cars loaded with 18 adults, pulling up and over the 1.7% grade trestle! Not bad for an engine on her maiden runs.  
 
Congrats Ray.
Posted by: Pennsy4483 Posted on: Mar 2nd, 2009, 1:14pm
Ray,
 
I just wanted to say that your locomotive is a beast!  Good job.  It was a pleasure meeting you and best of luck in finishing your beauty off.  Can't wait to see you (and your locomotive) again.
 
Don
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Mar 3rd, 2009, 6:32am
Ray,
I'm glad that you were able to have a successful run with the Mike. I can't wait to see it in person. In the mean time, I'll avidly follow the completion of this engine, right here. Please, keep posting your progress.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Mar 4th, 2009, 9:57pm
Guys,
 
   I could'nt help myself. I had to post this pic. After we have seen all of the stages of building this boiler, here it is on it's chasis and heading for the main line for the first time with a full head of steam.
 
   Thanks Ray for shareing this special event with all of us during the steam only Un-Meet of '09' at the BCRR. Seeing that engine run for the first time on it's own, will stir memories for a long time to come.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Mar 7th, 2009, 9:07am
With the un-meet 09 behind us, and the first run of the mike a success. It's time to get back to work.   There were a few issues with the engine that need to be changed or adjusted, but nothing major.  I was very pleased with the first run.  I would like to thank everyone at the un-meet 09 for being there and making it such a memorable week.  A special thanks goes out to Pete Bialecki,  Duncan Herring,  Joe Tanski, and Chuck McCarley.  I left home a day and a half late.  I was welding and machining parts , within a few hours of my departure. When I pulled out,  I still needed to plumb the injectors, the axle pump line back to the bypass valve , and  plumb the lubricator.   On thursday at the BCRR while I was putting the tendgola together, Duncan approached me and asked what he could do to help, before I knew it there were  4 people helping me plumb the engine.  Duncan and Joe were  plumbing the firemans side  , while myself and chuck  plumbed the engineers side.  Pete was silver soldering the fittings for us. A half days work was reduced to a little over an hour.  Not one of them were asked to help, they just offered and it was greatly appreciated.  A perfect example of the live steam hobby. Ray III    
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Mar 7th, 2009, 9:46am
This pic was taken on fri morning , the day I was suppose to leave. Notice there are not any water glasses or pressure gauge, nor is there any throttle.  The throttle  parts still needed to be fabricated .
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Mar 7th, 2009, 9:47am
this pic shows the smokebox plumbing. the fitting on the tee below the ball valve is where the oil line will tie in.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Mar 7th, 2009, 9:52am
pic shows the safetys installed.  140# and 145#
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Mar 7th, 2009, 9:54am
this pic shows the engine about to roll into the truck, for the trip to florida.
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Mar 7th, 2009, 3:28pm
on Mar 7th, 2009, 9:07am, SteamHeaton wrote:       (Click here for original message)
On thursday while I was putting the tendgola together, Duncan approached me and asked what he could do to help, before I knew it there were  4 people helping me plumb the engine.  

 
So, it takes a village to build a loco?  
Ray, just kidding, great job by everyone involved, especially you.  I am very motivated to pick up the pace on my own mikado!
Dan Watson
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Mar 7th, 2009, 6:20pm
on Mar 7th, 2009, 9:07am, SteamHeaton wrote:       (Click here for original message)
With the un-meet 09 behind us, and the first run of the mike a success. It's time to get back to work.   There were a few issues with the engine that need to be changed or adjusted, but nothing major.  I was very pleased with the first run.  I would like to thank everyone at the un-meet 09 for being there and making it such a memorable week.  A special thanks goes out to Pete Bialecki,  Duncan Herring,  Joe Tanski, and Chuck McCarley.  I left home a day and a half late.  I was welding and machining parts , within a few hours of my departure. When I pulled out,  I still needed to plumb the injectors, the axle pump line back to the bypass valve , and  plumb the lubricator.   On thursday while I was putting the tendgola together, Duncan approached me and asked what he could do to help, before I knew it there were  4 people helping me plumb the engine.  Duncan and Joe were  plumbing the firemans side  , while myself and chuck  plumbed the engineers side.  Pete was silver soldering the fittings for us. A half days work was reduced to a little over an hour.  Not one of them were asked to help, they just offered and it was greatly appreciated.  A perfect example of the live steam hobby. Ray III    

 
This is a picture of the crew of live steamers who stepped up to help Ray out in order for him to run his mike.
Ray H. on left, right behind him Chuck Mc. working on the "tendgola". to the center rt. Pete, with a piec of tubeing in his hand, heading for the shop, low on the side of the engine, Dunkin Herring, and rt. nearer the camera is Joe Tanski. Quite a hand full of accomplished live steamers working with Ray so he could realize his dream of the mike's first run.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Mar 10th, 2009, 11:37pm
thank you Bobby,  it was so nice to see you and all of the BCRR crew again.  Greg  I sure wish you could have been there.   Hopefully next year we will see you .  Don it was a pleasure meeting you and the  rest of the ten wheeler group as well.  I am looking forward to following your project .   Dan thank you , yes it does take the village , or at least it sure helps.  I can already picture the  double heading I.C. mikes.   Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 16th, 2009, 9:47pm
After returning from the un-meet 09,  there were several things that needed attention.   I have been busy working on the engine ,  last weekend  I took it to Kenny Davis track in Decatur Illinois.   The engine was fired up for  5 1/2  hours.   It ran great.   The next few pics will show  the insulation applied to the steam rated ball valve throttle in the smokebox, also  2 pics from last sunday at kennys track. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 16th, 2009, 9:49pm
another pic of insulation
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 16th, 2009, 10:13pm
diff angle of last pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 16th, 2009, 10:14pm
last insulation pic.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 16th, 2009, 10:17pm
the last  2 pics are from april 12th at kennys track.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 16th, 2009, 10:18pm
last pic for tonight
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Apr 17th, 2009, 8:57am
Ray,
Thanks for the update.  
 
Why did it become necessary to insulate the throttle valve? Inquiring minds....
 
That's a good looking tendola you've got there, too.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 19th, 2009, 10:16pm
Greg , I had planned to insulate the throttle before I left for florida.  I, ran out of time, so it had to wait until I returned home.  This ball valve is rated for 600 water, oil, gas [WOG] and 250 saturated steam.  It has a blowout proof stem, 316 stainless ball, and multi filled TFE seat.  The reinforced TFE is rated at 450 degrees.  After talking with Bruce R. , I decided to insulate it ,to extend the life of the valve.  Ray III
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Apr 20th, 2009, 6:58am
Gotcha, Ray. Thanks. This answer also gives a little insight into smokebox temperatures; another area I've been curious about.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Apr 20th, 2009, 7:23am

 
   Greg,
 
   I know this is a little off topic here, but you and Ray broached the subject. So here goes.  
   I don't use as good quality ball valve as Ray does, but I have always, except for once, wraped the valve in plain old pink fiber glass insulation. The last one that I removed from the recently defunk boiler was in service for five years. However, once, quite some years ago, I did'nt wrap the valve, it lasted little more than a year. Of course that is with a lot of running. But I always did a lot of running, as you know. So, the pink insulation does work.
 
   Bruce
 
   ps
   Sorry for jumping off topic.
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Apr 20th, 2009, 11:07am
Bruce,
I fail to see where you went OT. The heading is "BOILER BUILDING + Other Projects by STEAMHEATON". That's fairly ambiguous. IMHO that covers just about anything that happens in his shop and conversations pertaining thereto.....
 
Greg B.
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Jun 6th, 2009, 9:09pm
So Ray, it's been 2 months, any updates?
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Jun 6th, 2009, 9:16pm
hi all,
 
bobby:  not to answer for ray, but...no, somebody sent him a crappy wooden caboose to deal with!
 
 
on Jun 6th, 2009, 9:09pm, BobbyT wrote:       (Click here for original message)
So Ray, it's been 2 months, any updates?

 
 
moose
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Jun 6th, 2009, 9:21pm

 
   George,
   I hope Ray brings a few rolls of paper towels with him to his next outing with the mike and the beautiful new caboose.  
 
   To wipe the droll off of the caboose that is. Heh,heh,heh.
 
   Bruce
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Jun 7th, 2009, 12:19pm
on Jun 6th, 2009, 9:16pm, moose_the_caboose wrote:       (Click here for original message)
hi all,
 
bobby:  not to answer for ray, but...no, somebody sent him a crappy wooden caboose to deal with!

 
Moose, I think you meant to say a "crummy" wooden caboose.  Too nice to be the other.
 
Dan
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Jun 7th, 2009, 9:07pm
hi all,
 
bruce:  i hear ya!   i also hope to see BOTH the erie and the ic together next time!  ray will soon figure out his birthday present...as i mentioned in the email!
 
dan:  the reason for the 'crappy' comment comes from being around horses many years ago.  people have a habit of naming a horse opposite of the horse's abilities...example, a horse named "fearless"...isn't.  if you find one named "utter rubbish", buy it!
 
moose
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jun 8th, 2009, 10:43am
Bobby, there has been very little  progress on the mike.  I hope to have an improved  ash pan finished for the Decatur meet this weekend.  I will post pics of it when it's done.  Ray III
Posted by: Steamin Posted on: Jun 14th, 2009, 9:33pm
Ray,
 Pleasure to meet you and your new mike yesterday at Kenny's track.  She sure runs great and the stacktalk sounds good.   What a great day we had during the meet.   I hope mine runs that good after I finish it.  And thanks for your patience while I was pestering you with all my questions!
 
Regards,
Denis
St. Louis
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 8:26pm
Denis, it was nice to meet you as well.   That was a great day indeed.   You certainly were not pestering me , with your questions about the mike.  Any assitance I can offer  you would be my pleasure. I have some pics of the  petti coat pipe, exhaust nozzle, and smoke box that I will post.   Hope they help. RayIII
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 9:33pm
pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 9:34pm
pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 9:36pm
pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 9:37pm
pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 9:39pm
pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 9:41pm
pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 9:43pm
pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 9:44pm
pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 9:45pm
pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 9:47pm
pic shows washer welded on exhaust nozzle , for blower ring to sit on.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 9:52pm
pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 9:54pm
smoke box plumbing.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 9:56pm
smokebox plumbing
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 10:14pm
The next few pics were taken on june 13th at the annual summer meet  at the home of Kenny Davis.  There were 14 steamers and 12 diesels at this years  meet.  The usual pot luck meal at noon and plenty of great railroading.  I did not take many pics due to the mike being fired  up for 8 hours, and it was only  the 3rd  time  it had ran.  I was like a mother hen.  The 1st pic  shows the mike on the car barn lead, firing up.  
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 10:18pm
this pic shows  Andrew, the son of a friend of mine from work who is also an engineer, approaching the station. This was there 2nd year at the meet.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 10:21pm
pic shows the mike at the station, with Andrew at the throttle, where many people  loaded trains for a trip around the railroad.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 10:23pm
pic shows one of Kennys car sheds
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 10:31pm
 This is the last pic of the meet, and it shows the most unusual piece of equipment  at the meet. It makes me think of lionel.   There aren't  any pics of the I.C. cab,  I can't believe it happened but it did.  I did get some video of it running  on the rear of a 17 car train.  Maybe I can get  moose to post that for me.  Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 10:55pm
The next set of pics show the mike at home on the stand with the I.C. cab. also they will show the tool I made to remedy a problem with the mike. I hope.      I have had,  what I thought was a squeak  coming from the front of the engine.  Was not sure what it was.  The lubricator was working too good , for it to be a dry metal situation.  I was really at a loss .  So I sent a copy of a tape of it running to several friends and Bruce R. was the first  to see the tape. he called and told me he felt it was an exhaust leak and not a metal rubbing situation.  After further investigation , I found that one of the exhaust lines, the rear one on the engineers side was covered in oil, while the other 3 were all dry.  I feel that this is the problem, so it is a whistle from the loose  comp nut , and not metal rubbing , that is making the noise.  This would have been a very simple fix before the smokebox was  bolted on, now not so easy.   There is almost no room to work, and I can't see the comp nut, only feel it with my finger tips. This called for a special tool.   Part crows foot and part line wrench.  It worked well and I was able to tighten the comp nut  1/2 turn. I hope to run it again soon to see if this did the trick. The pics will show what I just described. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 10:58pm
another pic of engine on stand
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 11:02pm
pic shows the print , that is looking from underneath the engine. The comp nut I am pointing to is the rear exhaust port on the engineers side and is  leaking ever so slightly, which sounds like a high pitch whislte. When the throttle is open.  there was oil on this  one line while the others were dry.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 11:04pm
pic shows the tool I made to tighten the comp nut. If this does not work the smokebox will have to come off.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 11:05pm
close up of last pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 11:10pm
pic shows me holding the new tool. this one is  3/4"
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 11:15pm
pic shows the 3 tools that were made. They all started out as box end wrenches, that I welded to a rod and then cut open to fit around the exhaust line. I could not measure the actual nut.  So I went off the print , and it showed a 7/8 comp nut.  This one was too big.  the next one I made was 3/4 and it seemed too small, so I made another one  13/16, it was too big also.  I then realized the 3/4 was not lined up properly the first time. Remember this is all done by feel , I cannot see this nut.  So the 3/4  worked great, I hope this does the trick.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 11:17pm
pic shows the actual working space I had.  I am pointing to the end of the 3/4"  tool,which I used a 11/16 wrench to turn it.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 12th, 2009, 11:27pm
last pic for tonight, is a closer view of the last pic
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Jul 13th, 2009, 7:23am
Necessity is the mother of invention! That is a pretty darn neat tool Ray! Well done.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Jul 13th, 2009, 9:26pm

 
   DAMN!!!!!!! I sure hope you don't have to do this twice!!!!!!
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 14th, 2009, 5:20am
thanks Bobby , and you are so right.    Bruce I hope not also.    Ray III
Posted by: Slipped_Eccentric Posted on: Jul 16th, 2009, 8:08pm
Nice solution Ray, hope it works out for you.  Has the front truck been behaving itself since the repairs at the unmeet?
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 21st, 2009, 8:43am
Thanks Bobby , Bruce, and Justin.   I hope it works..    Justin yes the front truck seems to be working fine.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Jul 29th, 2009, 7:11pm

 
   For all of those folks that followed along with Ray through all of the steps to build this quite large boiler, here is that same boiler producing steam.  
These shots were taken at the track of Kenny Davis in north central Illinois, early April,then again in June, '09'.  
I think, as the video shows, "steamheaton" did a fine job of constructing this boiler. He also did what most REAL live steamers do. At the end of the video, Ray hands off the new mike to Andrew, a young up and coming live steamer. Who seems to be doing a good job of running BTW.
 
   Sorry for the poor quality of the vid.
 
   I hope everyone that followed this boiler building saga enjoys this video
 
 
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4FceAAWYA-w
 
 
Posted by: Pennsy4483 Posted on: Jul 30th, 2009, 8:38am
Ray - great job on the loco.  She sounds great.  Can't wait to see it again (maybe next year at the Unmeet?).  On a side note, was that a cerian Rutland 10-wheeler that make a special guest appearance in the video for just a moment?  Keep up the great work!  Can't wait until I can polish the high iron with my steamer.
 
Don
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 19th, 2009, 11:37pm
Thanks bobby, your right about necessity being the mother of inventions.   Justin, it was great to see you at the train festival. The front truck has been working fine since the repair at the un-meet.  Don , yes that is the ten wheeler that Pete built.  Bruce, as we now know the exhaust line was not the only problem.  I should have it back together  this week and hope to test run it next friday.  I found some grooves in both cylinder liners .  This  must have been the cause for the whistle sound.  I might have to make some new  pistons, just not sure yet.    Ray III
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Aug 20th, 2009, 9:44am
Ray,
 
With your apparent skills, and the deep well of knowledge at your disposal, I have no worries that the mike will be in top running form in time for the next un-meet. But please feel free to post some photo's of teh cylinder rebuild. I am sure most would find it interesting and some might learn something too.
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Sep 17th, 2009, 8:52pm
Ray,
A lot has happened since I saw you at the un-meet in February.  I bought that house in Lehigh Acres.  I am only about 30 miles from Pete's track.  I moved my lathe and milling machine over there about a month ago.  I still have to work about 2 more years before I can retire.  I've been going over there every other week to mow the lawn and  get the place ready to do some serious train building.  While on ebay a couple of weeks ago I saw a small cnc punching machine.  I ended up buying it.  It will be delivered in a week or so.  If you have drawings for a tender and everything goes ok I should be able to punch out the parts for you.  It sure beats drilling all those rivet holes one at a time.
Bill
(pictures to follow)
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 22nd, 2009, 1:40pm
Bill , Great to hear from you.  It sounds like you have been busy at your new house.  That will be great , when you are there full time, and retired.  I have  17 1/2 years  to go.  Thank you  for the  offer on the tender, I already have the side sheets.  They were  cnc punched for me by Duncan Herring.   I  plan on building an auxiliary tender to house the air comp, and tools.   Your help with that  would be great.   I will bring  my plans down to the un-meet 2010.   Ray III
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2009, 8:22am
Bill, What part of Lehigh do you live? I am off of Sunshine Blvd. just North of Lee Blvd.
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Oct 20th, 2009, 10:44pm
I had the opportunity to meet Ray for the first time at the Chattanooga Society of Model Engineers at their Fall Meet.  Very glad to be able to get to know him better.  It was a kinda soggy weekend, and rail adhesion was a problem.  But a great time (at least for me).
 
Here's a photo from the CSME web site:

 
Now the really great part:  Ray gave me the opportunity to run his engine!  Wow.  Bigger than anything else I've run, except for Pete's Mohawk.  My hat's off to you, Ray!
Dan
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Oct 20th, 2009, 11:09pm

 
   Dan,
 
   I'm really glad you had the opportunity to meet Ray. I've known him since he was a kid in SE Florida. A REAL "live steam gentleman"  is who you met. And there are'nt too many of them left!!
 
   Hope to see you soon,
 
   Bruce
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 22nd, 2009, 10:45pm
Dan,  after more than a year of chatting on railfan , it was  great to finally meet you.   The weather was cool and damp/ wet at times . That made the throttle time more challenging , but no less fun.   What a great group of  people, and a beautiful railroad.  A real treasure for live steamers on this side of the country.  The pleasure was all mine when you ran the engine, getting to share the engine  with fellow  live steamers, makes all the work that much more worth it.  I look forward to a double head in the future.  I did not take many pics, but did get some  video from the train , along with the video , you shot for me.  I will try and post some of it in the near future.     Ray III
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Oct 23rd, 2009, 8:04am
Ray, It is obvious from the photo's that you got your cylinder rebuild finished. The question on everyones mind is, did it fix the problem? How did she run?
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 23rd, 2009, 9:14am
Bobby,   I was holding my breath.   I did not have time to take the engine to Decatur for a test run after the cylinder rebuild, before heading down to eagle point railroad   I had to hone the liner, and turn the piston down.    The print called for  cast iron liner and a brass piston.  A bronze liner and a aluminum piston were used.  It looked like the  piston expanded and galled  against the liner causing the grooves.   We only ran for  2 hours on friday due to the weather and slick rail conditions, temps were in the mid to low 40's with drizzle. Then you add 2 and 3 percent grades.    Duncan and I double headed and had our hands full with just his three coaches.  I was pleased to not hear any whistle sounds on friday. Then on saturday we fired up early, as it was suppose to rain again in the afternoon.   The mike was fired up for a little over 6 hours.  It did whistle for about  2 or 3 minutes early in the morning but went away. It never did it again and  was working hard enough and  long enough to hopefully expose any problems. Time will tell.   It ran great and sounded great.    Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 23rd, 2009, 10:35am
Bobby here is a pic of the liner before I honed it.   Both sides had grooves, only the cylinders, the valves were fine.  Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 23rd, 2009, 10:36am
after it was cleaned up
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Oct 24th, 2009, 10:14am
Ray,
I'll look forward to seeing your videos.  Hopefully the videographer on the back of train wasn't too unsteady.  
My Davenport was also slipping and sliding at the track, and now I'm thinking that working sanders might be a useful addition........however, it doesn't have a hot boiler to keep the sand dry  
Dan
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Oct 26th, 2009, 10:34pm
  Dan,
 
   I spoke to Ray last evening. I  can hardly wait to see this vid myself. Its always a pleasure to see a piece of equipment, built by a real craftsman, operating on a challenging track. And being shared with other "real live steamers".
 
   BTW, when can we expect you down in the wilds of N. Ft. Myers, Fl. ?
 
   Bruce
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Oct 26th, 2009, 11:36pm
Bruce,
I'm shooting for the 2010 un-meet.  Doubt I can get down there before that.
Dan
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Nov 2nd, 2009, 9:39pm
Ray,
Hard to believe it's less than four months until the winter meets down here in sunny Florida.  I am planning to go to Larry Smith's on Nov. 13,14,15 for his fall meet.  I  am planning to take vacation in February so I can attend the unmeet for at least 2 days.
Bobby T,
I still live and work in Miami.  My retirement home is a few blocks from Alabama and Milwaukee.  I go up there at least twice a month.  Hopefully more often during the winter.  I hope to start coming over to Buckingham at least once a month.
Bill
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Nov 4th, 2009, 9:54pm
Bill, Yes Feb will be here before we know it.  I'm looking forward to seeing you at Pete's.  I am also planning on going to Largo the sat and sun before the un-meet.  Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 5th, 2010, 12:13am
It's been a while ,since my last post on this thread.   The work that I did on the cylinders, seems to have solved the problems.  I ran the engine for a day and a half at eagle point in oct, then  an entire week of running at BCRR un-meet 2010.  The tendgola made an encore appearance at un-meet 2010, I planned on the tender being done for the meet, but  that was not the case.  Yes I've heard it is" functional yet tacky", with my plastic bucket for coal and a tupperware for water, but it has served me well.  The next set of pics are of the tender frame construction. The first pic is the tender frame parts, ready for assembly. just this  one pic tonite more tomorrow. Ray III
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Apr 5th, 2010, 5:42am

 
   Ray,
 
   After seeing you AND everybody else run your engine at the spectacular
2010 Un-Meet, I would'nt give a damn what some "a$$ olds" in the hobby these days have to say about your engine or your workmanship. I just hope they get a good look at the video that will be posted this week.
 
   Looking forward to watching the tender come together.
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Apr 5th, 2010, 8:26am
Ray, I found a pic of you at Bill Kosters. It's in the November, 1984, Live Steam on page 60.
 
Don't take any heed of the tendgola cracks. You know who's just teasing and who's being a curmudgeon. The hobby is rife with curmudgeons who have never built anything more complex than a peanut butter sandwich and are totally clueless about what it takes just to make the wheels go 'round.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Apr 5th, 2010, 11:38am
Greg - LOL  
 
Ray, you had a choice to either sit in a chair and tell the world your opinion of how things should be built or run, or you could do whatever it took to get on the rails and run. You chose to run....and run well. You are an excellent builder, but lets face it, you are a Live Steamer first and foremost.
 
Looking forward to the tender updates.
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Apr 5th, 2010, 6:35pm
hi all,
 
ray: i really can't add any more than what's already been said, but i will add this...you build equipment that runs until the cows come home and then some.  there are those that would benefit from your example...test it, run it, prove it and then and only then, make it pretty.  too many in our hobby build for pretty, first, and operational...well, somewhere down the road.  you know my feelings about 'roundhouse queens' and the machines that get out there to 'pull the barn down'.  i've never heard of or seen you build something that didn't function as intended.  the barns you've pulled down are legendary!
 
you know where i'm headed and you know that i'm going to enjoy everything you post on the mike and its tender...keep up the good work.
 
moose  
 
 
on Apr 5th, 2010, 12:13am, SteamHeaton  
 
wrote:       (Click here for original message)
It's been a while ,since my last post on this thread.   The work that I did on the cylinders, seems to have solved the problems.  I ran the engine for a day and a half at eagle point in oct, then  an entire week of running at BCRR un-meet 2010.  The tendgola made an encore appearance at un-meet 2010, I planned on the tender being done for the meet, but  that was not the case.  Yes I've heard it is" functional yet tacky", with my plastic bucket for coal and a tupperware for water, but it has served me well.  The next set of pics are of the tender frame construction. The first pic is the tender frame parts, ready for assembly. just this  one pic tonite more tomorrow. Ray III

Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 6th, 2010, 10:41am
Thanks guys,  Bruce you  know better than most, the joy of sharing your engine with other live steamers or future live steamers. That very gesture is how most of us were bitten with this bug.  Greg you are right about the PBJ.  Besides this tupperware was like having a pennsy coast to coast tender. I looked through my live steam collection and I do not have that issue. I was 17 that year, that was  close to the end of Bill Koster's track in Homestead FL.   Bobby like you said before , necessity was the mother of this  invention, just days before the un-meet 09.    George , now that the debugging is complete , for the most part.  It is going to be fun putting the ginger bread on, so it looks like a I.C. mike     Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 6th, 2010, 11:56am
The steel for the tender and aux tender was cut about  2 years ago and set aside. This past sept I started to assemble the parts.  I now have the frame welded together, the side sheets, that were cut out and all rivet holes cnc drilled by Duncan H.  Now have over 800 rivets installed,just for looks.  The trucks are almost finished, all that is needed is the installation of 4 allen head screws on each end of each bolster ,  a spring will sit on each screw , and the screw will keep the spring in position.  The print called for  elliptical springs on the andrews trucks, but the IC used coil springs.  This is not so much rivet counting as it is an easier and less expensive route. The trucks came with the engine , it would have been easier to buy a set already put together , but I have never  machined a set of trucks , from start to finish. I figured this would be a great time to jump in and learn. I turned to my friends in Decatur,  they were glad to help and in just 5 saturday afternoons,  a box of castings were a rolling pair of trucks.  I had pics of the machining that took place in Decatur on the side frames and bolsters, but  I dropped an sd card out of my camera bag, which was found several days later after it had rained . The pics of the bolsters, and side frames in the mill were lost  unfortunately.  I do have pics of the  wheels and axles  becoming 1.  I learned so much in those 5 saturdays, Tim J [alcosteam] did the bulk of the work explaining all the way and letting me get my hands dirty on each operation .  A huge thanks goes out to  my friends in Decatur. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 6th, 2010, 11:57am
the beginning of the tender.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 6th, 2010, 11:58am
axle in raw form
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 6th, 2010, 12:00pm
Tim J checking the axle before the next cut.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 6th, 2010, 12:01pm
one end of one axle
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 6th, 2010, 12:03pm
All wheels done , and one wheel set together. These were heated and slid on instead of pressing them on.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 6th, 2010, 12:05pm
A test fit of the trucks on the frame.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 6th, 2010, 12:07pm
side view,and last pic for today.  The 12" to the foot  just called.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Apr 6th, 2010, 7:50pm

   Man, that is looking good. I guess the "tendgola" is close to retirement??
It sure did serve the purpose though. Allowed you and everybody else to run the wheels hot on your "mike".
 
BTW, thanks again for the vid. I've started on editing and posting it. More  spectacular steam-only views soon.
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Apr 6th, 2010, 8:49pm
UH OH, looks like the man is gettin' serious again..... Rock on, Ray.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Apr 8th, 2010, 9:11pm

 
   Ray,
 
   I certainly don't want to take anything away from your new tender build, but I just went back to Replys 901 and 902. And took a good look at that cylinder that you described to me any number of times over the phone.
   You did one hell of a repair job on it. And, if there are any truely interested live steamers lurking here, and some that recently started to post here, they should give a listen, and put an "eye ball" on your "mike" running on the video from the Steam Only Un-Meet of 2010. That thing is right on the money, as our old friend Ben used to say.
   Thanks to you, Pete and I watched your video last Monday evening. As we watched your "mike" rolling along, Pete looked at me and said, he needs to leave that thing right where it is. its right. Now, you know, thats quite a compliment.
 
   Talk to you soon.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Apr 10th, 2010, 7:53am
Greg , yes it is good to get back in the shop.  The last half of 2009 ,I was busy with non live steam stuff , for lack of a better word.  I am looking forward to the tender fabrication.   Bruce , that's quite a compliment indeed,  and one that means alot to me , because of my lack of experience in the valve motion area.   The raritan has D valves with slip eccentrics, so for almost 30 years , that was my hands on experience in timing.  Very basic and nothing like walschaerts, with piston valves.  I might add ,that there were  many calls to friends in several states including you and Pete, for advice while I was rebuilding the cylinders and timing the mike.   Thanks Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 5th, 2010, 11:08pm
It's been a while since my last post.    Since my last post I discovered a slight bow and twist in the tender frame from to much heat at one time.  I was stumped for  a while , on what to do.   With the frame problem holding me up, I just left it lay for a while.  Many hours were spent  thinking about ways to resolve my problem, while at the coal mine flying around the loop, loading  the coal train at a blistering  .25 mph.  at that speed you can load one in about 5 hours on average.  You can actually count each piece of ballast at that speed.  I finally came up with a plan.  I used the press to remove the bow , and then cut the bolsters off of the frame , then rewelded them back in there original places .   When I welded them back on, I kept them true to each other.  This is how I am going to deal with the slight twist that remains.  It is almost 3/16ths difference from one end to the other over a length of  53 inches.  You would probably have never  known  it, if I did not tell you.  It really bugs  me that the twist is still there , but it was this or  make another frame.   It's just not bad enough to warrant that.  So here are some pics ,of the frame  upon the trucks behind the engine with one side sheet  in place just to check the fit.  I had to lengthen the stand to hold the tender also.  In the next week I hope to attach the end sills, and I need to weld the coupler pocket.   Then I will start welding the side sheets on.   I was going to spray the inside of the tank with truck bed liner , but have decided to fabricate a stainless tank insert instead. A little long winded , but just wanted to catch you up on the project.  Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 5th, 2010, 11:14pm
next five pics are just different  angles of the engine and tender.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 5th, 2010, 11:16pm
another pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 5th, 2010, 11:18pm
another pic
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 5th, 2010, 11:19pm
side view
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 5th, 2010, 11:20pm
last pic for tonight.
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Dec 5th, 2010, 11:45pm
Ray,
Great to see your tender coming together!  It is going to be a beaut!
About the twist in your tender frame, I'm sure that amount won't hurt anything.  But--if it still bugs you, I have a suggestion:
1. Lay the frame on the driveway, bottom up.
2. Park your truck with one of the front tires sitting on one end of the frame.
3. Put a 1X2 block under the "low" corner of the other end of the frame, by lifting the frame with a crowbar.
4. Administer "tender" loving blows to the "high" corner with an 8 lb sledge hammer (or jump up and down on it!), until the frame is un-twisted.
Good Luck!
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 6th, 2010, 12:08am
Thanks Dan,  I will have to leave it as is since the bolsters are welded  on already .  The truck would have certainly been a good  way to hold it down . Ray III
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Dec 6th, 2010, 10:16am
on Dec 5th, 2010, 11:08pm, SteamHeaton wrote:       (Click here for original message)
 I was going to spray the inside of the tank with truck bed liner , but have decided to fabricate a stainless tank insert instead. Ray III

Ray,
 
Your thought on why you decieded to not go with bed liner.  I have my tender to do and thought that would be good but friends say no, Go Stainless.  
 
Tom C.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 6th, 2010, 3:55pm
Tom C.    I have used a asphalt based mobile home roof sealant for years on the raritan, infact it is still in the tender today. Thats applied to a 16 gauge steel tender body, for 18 years now. I did have to reapply a dab or 2 over the years , but for the most part it has served me well.   A friend of mine was building a new engine and told me he was going to have a commercial bed liner  [Linex] spayed in his tender.  He did and was told by the company applying it, that there was some trouble getting a good coat of the material in the corners.  It leaked  in the corners and  he was told to put windshield sealant in the corners, it worked for awhile and started to leak again.  I do not want to deal with that. I can probably fab a stainless tank for close to what he had in his  spray in liner. He also said he will make a stainless  insert for his next engine.   Ray III
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Dec 6th, 2010, 4:17pm
Things you know, Ray; Warps, twists, crooks and kinks, it's merely metal. With the deft application of heat and hammer, it all comes out in the wash....
 
It looks plenty good, from here.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Dec 6th, 2010, 8:32pm
Ray, it is looking good. It is kind of bitter sweet.......the thought of the end of the famous "tendola" (pat. pend.)  
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Dec 7th, 2010, 7:26am

 
   W O W, that tender is a bit longer than I realized. Even after our many phone conversations, for some reason, I did'nt think it was that long. Looks like your makeing good progress. And yes, the "tendgola" sure did serve the purpose. While the critics sat on the side lines and critizied, you were out there running. FOR DAYS ON END. Screw them and their magazine articles!!!!!!!
 
   Can't wait to see you at the Un-Meet.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 19th, 2011, 12:21am
Hello, It's time to blow the dust off of this thread.  I have been slowly chipping away at the tender.  I have just under 4 weeks until the eagle point fall meet, and I hope to have the tender  behind the engine in time .   I now have both end sills finished and attached.  rear coupler pocket is finished with coupler bolted on. the front sill is ready for the drawbar.  Tonight  I began welding the  small 1/2" angle to top and bottom of the side sheets. The bottom angle will then be welded to the tender deck, and the top one will support the tender lid .    I hope to make it to the sheet metal shop,  early next week to talk to them about  my stainless steel water tank insert.  A call to Connie for the  tender  numbers is on my list of things to do .  Not sure which way to go vinyl or a paint mask.  I am going to number the engine  1599.  The only IC  mike I could find with a delta truck was the 1598.  I hope to make a hodges truck some day , but if I dont it will be the imaginary sister to the 1598.  LOL.    I will post some pics of the progress tomorrow .  Ray III      
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Sep 22nd, 2011, 8:58pm

 
   OK, I'm witing for the pictures. OR,, are you haveing too much fun playing the BIG trains.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 22nd, 2011, 11:09pm
LOL, yes I did say I would post some pics didn't I.   I have plenty to post . Yes Bruce the 12" to the foot has  been very busy.  I have been busy today fabricating the water tank lid, and the neck under it.  Going to go weld it  together now. I will try and post some pics tomorrow.  I had to break away from the side sheets and get this  lid and neck built.  So the sheet metal shop could use it as a template for the stainless tank neck that will come up into the decorative one . Ray III  
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2011, 1:20am
1st pic is the rear coupler bolted on and ready to pull a train. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2011, 1:21am
side view off the future. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2011, 1:24am
pic of angle iron being welded to the top and bottom of the coal  bunker.  The top angle will support the tender lid and the bottom angle will be welded to the tender floor tying them together.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2011, 1:50am
coal bunker fab. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2011, 1:51am
coal bunker fab overhead view. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2011, 1:54am
Welding small angle iron onto back sheet of tender. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2011, 9:43am
pic shows the tender hatch neck being bent.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2011, 9:46am
neck is bent, ended up with a small gap to fill.  The piece of plate under the neck will be cut into the base plate of the hatch. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2011, 9:48am
pic shows the plate cut out for the base of the hatch. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2011, 9:49am
pic of neck and base together. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2011, 9:51am
pic of lid ,neck, and base test fit. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2011, 10:02am
pic of the lid casting as it was originally.  I have a great set  of drawings  of the I.C. mike from a 1987 model railroader mag.  It shows a more squared off lid.  I am not rivet counting , but will try to have it as close as I can.  Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2011, 10:03am
lid after  modifications. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2011, 10:05am
getting an idea , how it's going to look together. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2011, 10:06am
time to weld it together. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2011, 10:11am
first welds on the base. I am going to weld all the way around the base, then try and grind part of it off . To give it a cast one piece look.  Like Greg was doing with the weld and then milling part of it off. I don't have a mill, so the 4 inch angle grinder will go to work.  I thought about just tack welding it from the inside ,and not welding the outside. but really wanted the one piece look. I hope it turns out  like I am wanting it to. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2011, 10:13am
moving around the base welding diff spots, so it will not warp. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2011, 10:14am
sitting on the tender lid to see how it will look. Ray III
Posted by: Henry Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2011, 11:22am
Thanks for the update Ray, it looks great!
 
Henry
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 23rd, 2011, 12:28pm
Thank you Henry.  It's so nice to have this web site to keep each other up to date on our projects, and share ideas. Ray III
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Sep 24th, 2011, 9:08pm
That lid is looking good Ray.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 25th, 2011, 10:21am
Thnx Bobby.   I hope to finish it today,  I need to weld the hinges  and it will be ready to take it to the sheet metal shop  on monday. RayIII
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 26th, 2011, 1:47am
I finished welding the neck to the base on saturday, then ground a radius into the weld. To give it the appearance of a casting.  I then used a sanding disc on my 4" grinder to polish it . This really cleaned it up nicely. I then made 4  hinges for the lid.   Sunday I welded them on.  I could not drill the inner 2 hinges , so only the outer  2 are bolted .  I had to grind the hinges  a little once they were on so the lid would open all of the way.  I will take this to the sheet metal shop on monday so they can get started on the stainless water tank. The neck on that tank will come up into this  neck.  first pic is showing the weld all the way around befor I started to grind the radius. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 26th, 2011, 1:51am
pic shows grinding the radius. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 26th, 2011, 1:53am
pic shows radius after  sanding disc was used. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 26th, 2011, 1:55am
test fit of the hinge pieces. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 26th, 2011, 1:57am
hinges tacked on. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 26th, 2011, 1:58am
hinges welded on, had to grind the hinge, so  the lid would clear and open all the way. Learn as you go. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 26th, 2011, 2:00am
the  lid open and working good. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 26th, 2011, 2:02am
pic of side view . Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 26th, 2011, 2:04am
close up of side view. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 26th, 2011, 2:06am
another open view. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 26th, 2011, 2:07am
pic of back view. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 26th, 2011, 2:09am
the last pic for tonight is back view with lid open, now that this is done , I can get back to the side sheets . I hope to have all of the side sheets welded to the deck in the next day or so. Ray III
Posted by: Pennsy4483 Posted on: Sep 26th, 2011, 8:45am
Ray,
 
Looking great!  Does this mean the official retirement of the famous tengola?  Best of luck finishing it up prior to your next planned trip.  Keep us posted on your progress.
 
Don
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 26th, 2011, 11:14am
  Don thanks, yes I believe the tendgola is heading for  storage, until someone needs to borrow it.    It's going to be a squeaker , but I think I can have it functional by the next outing.   I will keep the pics coming. Ray III
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Sep 26th, 2011, 11:38am
Give a creative man a welder and an eraser, and the world is his oyster. Very nice, Ray, from concept through execution.
 
Greg B.
Posted by: TopFrog Posted on: Sep 26th, 2011, 9:41pm
Ray
Maybe Duncan can borrow the "tengola" for the A for a year or so
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Sep 26th, 2011, 10:05pm
Thank you Greg,  I had to think for a second , when  you said eraser. Never  heard it called that, but I like it.  
   Scott, I don't think you will get to see the patent pending tendgola behind the A. At the rate Duncan is going , I think you will see the whole enchilada, running at un-meet 2013. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 2nd, 2011, 10:06pm
Hello, everybody.  I have been busy in the shop when the CN leaves me alone. I have gotten alot done since the last pics.  The tender is 90 % done. The entire body is welded together and all of the  lids [2 water legs and the back area] are on . The coal bunker is welded in. I still need to finish drilling and tappping the  holes for the lids, but they are fitted and sitting in place.  The plate that angles up from the coal bunker is in place, but needs to be attached.  I hope to make the grab irons and get them on before It goes to the paint shop.  The stainless water tank should be done in a few days . When I get the tank , I will cut the hole in the lid and attach the hatch.  Then plumb the  few water lines and head for eagle point. It sounds like alot left to do , but it really is'nt.  I have a bunch of pics to post , but the @%$#&%#@  CN just called and will post them when I get home.   Ray III    
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Oct 3rd, 2011, 8:58pm

 
   Holy mackeral Ray, you did a lot of stuff after our conversation. You should be in pretty good shape for this next outing. Man, I better get moveing on my little projects before this meet at Eagle Point.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 6th, 2011, 2:56am
Well the tender was suppose to go to the paint shop today.   I had to delay that by 1 day , just had too much left to do.  The stainless steel water tank will be finished tomorrow. They let me bring it home tonight as it was all tacked together, and I used it to locate the hole for the water hatch. It will go back to them in the morning so they can finsh welding it. They did a great job on it.   The tender is ready for  paint , and will be painted and back in the shop by monday or tuesday.   I will then have to run my plumbing before leaving on thursday morning.   I have alot of fab pics , but just do not have the time to load them right now.  I usually like to show the work as it was done then the final product, but  not this time .  Here is a pic as it looks tonight.  The only things that are not done at this point are the steps, the grab irons, and  4 little L shape brackets that go at the rear of the tank and tie into the rear sill.  All of this will be made and added after  I go to the meet .    Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 6th, 2011, 2:58am
close up of last pic. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 6th, 2011, 2:59am
front view . Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 6th, 2011, 3:00am
another front view. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 6th, 2011, 3:04am
pic of the stainless tank test fit. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 6th, 2011, 3:05am
last pic for tonight,  lid open on hatch and looking down into the stainless tank. Ray III
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Oct 6th, 2011, 6:10am

 
   Very, very nice Ray. That tender is really looking GOOD !!
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Oct 6th, 2011, 8:13am
WOW RAY!  you are making great progress and looks really sharp.  Post more when u have time.
 
Tom C.
Posted by: pockets Posted on: Oct 6th, 2011, 8:17am
How sweet it is.....
 
Greg B.
Posted by: charleytt Posted on: Oct 6th, 2011, 2:54pm
nice keep it up ray can't wait to see it at the unmeet
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Oct 6th, 2011, 9:55pm
very nice work Ray! don't forget to add "make a tushy cushy" to your to do list.  
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 8th, 2011, 8:05am
Thanks guys,  I hope to have the tender back by monday, the stainless tank is already here.   I am going to buy all of the  plumbing supplies today.   After all of this time I can't believe I almost have a tender.    Tom I will post the rest of the fab pics when I get home from the meet next weekend.   Bobby A new seat is on the list LOL.    Greg UN-MEET 2012.  Ray III
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Oct 8th, 2011, 10:40am
on Oct 8th, 2011, 8:05am, SteamHeaton wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Thanks guys,  I hope to have the tender back by monday, the stainless tank is already here.   I am going to buy all of the  plumbing supplies today.   After all of this time I can't believe I almost have a tender.    Tom I will post the rest of the fab pics when I get home from the meet next weekend.   Bobby A new seat is on the list LOL.    Greg UN-MEET 2012.  Ray III

 
ray:  daumn that tender looks good next to that caboose!!!   can't wait to cook with you again at the 2012 unmeet!  
 
moose
Posted by: bteerlin Posted on: Oct 8th, 2011, 6:59pm
Ray -- Don't know if I'll recognize your engine with that really nice first class tender behind it.  Hope the tengola doesn't get jealous.  You might get altitude sickness sitting that high might want to take some oxygen with.  
Bruce the Larger
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 9th, 2011, 10:05pm
George,   yes it does, can't wait to see a string of brown offset hoppers with the mainline of mid america on their side.  We will have a brand new kitchen this year. Gonna need it for all of those pies, plus 4 more for Scott and Clayton LOL.    Bruce thanks,  I was thinking about what you said. This will be a new exp for me .  The tendgola is about the same height as the raritans tender.  So after 30 years of running at that level I will need oxygen and a step ladder. The raritan is 33 this year.   I talked to the painter tonight . He said I will have the tender back at my shop tuesday afternoon.   So I will load all my cars tomorrow , and leave tuesday open for  plumbing.    Ray III
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Oct 9th, 2011, 10:24pm

 
   Ray,
 
   I know this is a little off topic, but I wanted to thank you for the push to get ole 7597 ready for this trip. I got so much crap done, that I  actually spent this evening sittin back a bit.
 
   Thanks again Ray.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 10th, 2011, 8:50am
Bruce, glad I was able to motivate you.  You are really going to appreciate it, in about 4 days.   I am really looking forward to next weekend, the mike has not ran since the last un-meet.    Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 11th, 2011, 10:40pm
Well the cars are all loaded, even the ex-tengola .  The tender is back in the shop as of an hour ago.  Too late to work on it tonight.  I will have to stay busy tomorrow to get it done.   First pic is a shot of the stainless tank with the water valves for the injectors, and the drain valve that will be mounted under the tender.  Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 11th, 2011, 10:42pm
side view. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Oct 11th, 2011, 10:44pm
last pic for tonight. I can't wait to try it out.  Ray III
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Oct 11th, 2011, 10:47pm

 
        NICE, NICE, NICE
Posted by: ConrailRed9504 Posted on: Oct 11th, 2011, 11:42pm
Very Nice!!
Posted by: ConrailRed9504 Posted on: Oct 11th, 2011, 11:57pm
Ray,
   Have a safe trip. Wish I were going, that's a real nice track.
Russ
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Oct 12th, 2011, 1:16pm
Ray,  It looks really nice with the gloss black on her.  Keep it clean ( as clean as can be behind a steam engine) so you won't have to wear the paint off cleaning it to add lettering.    Have fun and take pics.
 
Tom C.
Posted by: bteerlin Posted on: Oct 13th, 2011, 3:07pm
Really nice Ray.  Seems ashame to get coal dust all over it (NOT).  Have a fun time at EPRR.
 
Bruce the Larger
Posted by: charleytt Posted on: Oct 13th, 2011, 3:21pm
ray to see the tengola retired after two unmeets lets be towing her for the rest good luck have fun and be safe on your drive to and from the meet take a bunch of pics of her running the rails.
 
 
charley t
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 16th, 2011, 4:33pm
Ray,
I received the teflon rings from Grainger today.
Bill
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 18th, 2011, 11:15pm
Bill, thats great.  Looking forward to trying them out. Ray III
 
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 19th, 2011, 6:47pm
Ray,
I received the pistons in the mail today.  Here are some drawings of the new pistons.
Bill
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 19th, 2011, 6:51pm
Another drawing.
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 19th, 2011, 6:52pm
Another drawing.
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 20th, 2011, 4:49pm
Started making the "Ring Retainers".
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 20th, 2011, 4:50pm
Machining the retainer to the correct thickness.
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 20th, 2011, 4:52pm
Retainer machined to .125".
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 20th, 2011, 4:53pm
Boring the retainer to 1.25".
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Dec 20th, 2011, 5:23pm

 
   Bill,
 
   Thanks so much for doing this interesting pictorial on this project on behalf of Ray H.
 
   Bruce R.
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 21st, 2011, 3:07pm
Facing off the piston.
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 21st, 2011, 3:08pm
Threading the piston.
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 21st, 2011, 3:10pm
Cutting threads on the mandrel.
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 21st, 2011, 3:12pm
Turning down the step for the ring retainer.
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 21st, 2011, 3:14pm
Pistons and ring retainers.
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 21st, 2011, 3:15pm
Piston assembly ready for the screws.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 21st, 2011, 8:43pm
Wow Bill, the new pistons are looking great.  I can't thank you enough for your help with this  project. Ray III
 
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 23rd, 2011, 8:02am
Ray,
I'm really happy the way the new pistons are turning out.  I should have the flat head screws and the viton o-rings by the middle of next week.  Once I get them it will only take a couple of hours to finish up the project.
Bill
 
This picture shows me getting ready to find the center of the ring retainer.
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 23rd, 2011, 8:04am
Transferring  the screw holes to the piston.
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 23rd, 2011, 8:17am
Tapping the screw holes in the piston using the tapping head.  It takes longer to set up the tapping head than it does to tap the holes.  Once set up it only takes about 10 seconds to tap each hole.
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 23rd, 2011, 8:18am
Turning down the piston to 2.490".
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 23rd, 2011, 8:20am
Pistons finished to the final diameter.
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Dec 23rd, 2011, 9:30am

 
   Bill, thats some nice work. Thanks again for posting the interesting pics of the process of making segmented pistons. Don't see this too often.
 
   Thanks,  
 
   Bruce
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 28th, 2011, 10:21am
Bruce,
As you know, Ray and I go back a long way.  My first locomotive was/is Ray's first locomotive.  I sold the Raritan to Ray when he was a teenager.  I hope these new pistons with the teflon rings solves his problem.
Bill
 
This picture shows me cutting the groove for the ring.
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 28th, 2011, 10:23am
Ring and backing o-ring in the groove.
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 28th, 2011, 10:25am
Retaining ring in place.
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 28th, 2011, 10:27am
The pistons are finished except for replacing the socket head screws with flat head screws.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 28th, 2011, 8:58pm
Thats fantastic Bill, thank you  so much.   We will give them a work out in about 8 weeks.  Ray III
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 30th, 2011, 7:49am
UPS delivered the flat head screws yesterday.  The pistons are finished.  Off to the post office this morning and in a few days we'll know if my efforts were worth it or not.
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Dec 30th, 2011, 8:05am
Bill, that is nice workmanship there. Ray should love it!
 
My question is, what holds the nut on tight on the piston end?  
 
Tom C.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Dec 30th, 2011, 10:27am
Tom, The piston threads onto the rod, and the nut jams against it.   I believe there was also a thread locker [ loctite] used , but not sure.  I bought the chassis running on air ,  so I am debugging as I go.   The original aluminum pistons , were too big and when they grew  after coming up to temp. They scored the bronze liner.  I turned them down  a little and it seemed to be ok for  1 1/2 years.  While at eagle point the problem  showed up again.  I pulled the heads off when I got home.  The engineers side was scored/ scratched on the bottom of the bore from mid point to the front.  The firemans side was scored worse , it was different . The scoring on the firemans side was from top to bottom towards the outside . The entire length of the bore.   My first thought was I needed to turn the pistons down a little more.  After alot of measuring and talking to many of my live steam friends. I decided it was time to get rid of the aluminum pistons, as they were already too small, and  turning them down more was not going to solve the problem. Of the many offers to help,  Bills  offer to make  a new set of  cast iron pistons and try  a set of teflon rings , was the quickest fix, and  I liked the idea of the teflon rings.  As for the real problem , which is the alignment of the guide bars, this will be addressed once I get the pistons back.  The engineers side is not parallel with the bore, and the firemans side is  off center to the outside.  Its not off much but enough to put the aluminum piston in a position to rubb and gall causing  the scoring.  I think if a cast piston was used, this  might have never been a problem .  A long winded answer Tom, but wanted to let everybody know  why we are doing this . Bill they look great and thanks again for your help.  Ray III
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Dec 30th, 2011, 10:41am

 
   Bill, I have to go along with Tom. That is some neat work there. And also, to go along with Tom, what does hold the piston nut tight. Also, I was wondering what is the amount of "squish" on the 'O' ring behind the solid piston rings?  I guess what I'm asking is, how much out ward force is there against the cylinder wall by the ring? I find this very interesting. Thanks so much for all the pictures and descriptions of the whole process.
 
   Hope to see you soon,
   
   Bruce
Posted by: ng_2-4-2 Posted on: Dec 31st, 2011, 6:18am
Bruce and Tom,
The backing o-ring is compressed about .040" against the teflon ring.  The teflon ring is about .020 over size.  In this case it is about 2.520".  It is compressed to 2.490" with a ring compressor and while being compressed, the piston is inserted into the the cylinder.  The compression of the o-ring keeps pressure on the teflon ring giving the seal against the cylinder wall.  
 
Here is a drawing of the end of the rod.  The piston is first threaded on to the rod against the shoulder and the jam nut keeps it from backing off.
Posted by: dgmarklin Posted on: Dec 31st, 2011, 7:28pm
Those are looking great!  It's really cool to see how they go together.  
I didn't realize Ray's engine had aluminum pistons, sorta odd to me. Even with them out of line and leaky, that engine could pull like a beast!  I'm sure the teflon will slide back and forth real nice in there.  
 
Looking forward to seeing you and the IC mikado at the unmeet, Ray.
 
 
Dean
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 3rd, 2012, 7:36pm
I just went out to get the mail, and  there was a box from Bill, with my new pistons.   They look great, I will post pics of the install.   The CN has  been keeping me pretty busy, I hope to work on the engine  wed or thur.   Thanks again Bill.  Ray III
Posted by: Dave_J Posted on: Jan 3rd, 2012, 9:21pm
Are the rings commercial, or cut from raw stock?
 
Thanks
 
Dave J.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 3rd, 2012, 10:01pm
Dave ,they are commercial.  These came from grainger.  They are solid , and reinforced with fiberglass.  You can buy them cut with a butt joint,  cut on a 45, and also a step joint.  I hope to install them tomorrow or thursday.  Ray III
Posted by: Brian Tusin Posted on: Jan 4th, 2012, 8:18pm
Ray,
 
What are the advantages of using the teflon rings?  I know there are a few people that use just viton o rings for piston and valve rings in 3/4 inch engines with no problems.  On 3/4 inch engines the boiler pressure and load is no where near what it would be on your Mikado.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 5th, 2012, 1:59pm
Brian,  the benefits are to be determined.  I did some research on them after Bill offered to make a new set of pistons, using them.   There are some very well know builders across the country who use them, and have been using them for years.  These are able to withstand 500 degrees, also might handle a  lubricator  failure better.  Time will tell.  They seem very promising.    Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 24th, 2012, 3:03pm
I finally was able to get out in the shop and work on the engine.  Installing the new pistons was at the top of the list , and the CN has kept me very busy as of late.  Last night and this morning I  had a few hours to get some work done.  I started on the engineers side.  I thought the guide bars were  nose down to the front , but they were not.  I removed the old shims and made some new ones.  I had .020 play and now I have .005    between the top and bottom guide bar.   With the new piston installed,  there is no binding through the full stroke .  I removed the wrist pin so I could move the piston and crosshead ,back and forth without rolling the engine.  I used the  aluminun ring compressing collar that Bill sent with the new pistons. They went in like a dream.  Since my  bronze liner is recessed in the cylinder casting about  .300.  I had to turn a step on the ring compressing collar.  The  only thing left to do on the engineers side is remove the piston , so I can loctite all of the screws in the new 3 piece pistons. Bill left this  task to me incase I needed to disassemble the piston. I will now post some pics to show you what I just described.  I hope to work on the firemans side this weekend.    Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 24th, 2012, 4:31pm
new pistons waiting to be installed. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 24th, 2012, 4:33pm
after honing , you can still see some very light marks in the liner . Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 24th, 2012, 4:36pm
pic of the engine on the stand , with the shop light on the cylinders.  Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 24th, 2012, 4:38pm
piston removed. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 24th, 2012, 4:39pm
wrist pin removed. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 24th, 2012, 4:42pm
The aluminum ring compressing collar , after the step was cut into it.  This collar has a slight taper on the non step side then goes to a straight bore . It worked perfectly. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 24th, 2012, 4:43pm
test fit of  collar on the cylinder. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 24th, 2012, 4:44pm
the collar in position. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 24th, 2012, 4:45pm
getting ready to compress the rings. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 24th, 2012, 4:46pm
Rings compressed. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 24th, 2012, 4:47pm
another pic of rings compressed. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 24th, 2012, 4:49pm
another pic, of ring compressed. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 24th, 2012, 4:50pm
install pic #1. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 24th, 2012, 4:51pm
install pic#2. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 24th, 2012, 4:52pm
install pic #3. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 24th, 2012, 4:53pm
on it's way into the cylinder. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 24th, 2012, 4:54pm
installed. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jan 24th, 2012, 4:55pm
last pic for today. front view of piston installed.  Ray III
Posted by: ErieAtlantic7597 Posted on: Jan 24th, 2012, 8:07pm

 
   WOW,,,,, that looks awesome. Glad you got the chance to get at least half of the job done.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Feb 3rd, 2012, 10:05am
Here are a couple of pics  of the firemans side.  I have had almost no time in the shop lately, and progress has been very slow.   The pics show the guide bars removed so I could make new shims and  open the holes a bit to allow for a little lateral adjustment.   Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Feb 3rd, 2012, 10:06am
more of the same . Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Feb 3rd, 2012, 10:07am
more of the same. Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Feb 3rd, 2012, 10:09am
last pic , all the same stuff , just a couple diff angles.  Now it's back out to the shop befor they call me in, I'm 1st out again.    Ray III
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Feb 14th, 2012, 11:42am
The mike is  back together, and once again, it is sitting next to the raritan in the back of my truck, all of the cars are loaded , and I will  leave in a few hours.   This has become one of my favorite weeks of the year. See you all soon.  Ray III
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Feb 14th, 2012, 6:34pm
on Feb 14th, 2012, 11:42am, SteamHeaton wrote:       (Click here for original message)
The mike is  back together, and once again, it is sitting next to the raritan in the back of my truck, all of the cars are loaded , and I will  leave in a few hours.   This has become one of my favorite weeks of the year. See you all soon.  Ray III

 
safe travels...see ya soon!!!!
 
moose
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: May 4th, 2012, 9:36pm
Ray, any updates on the Mikado? A cab maybe?
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: May 6th, 2012, 12:29am
Bobby, no progress to report.  The  CN has decided we were not running far enough , and now have us learning the track all the way to memphis .  Which doubles  the length of my run. In a ddition to that , our coal trains have grown fron 115 and  120 to an amazing  150.   The  115 weighed in at  about 16000 tons and the  150 are  21,400 tons and  8300 ft long.  This has left very little time at home and  0 time for cab building.  The cab is the next project, and I will post  pics as soon  I  get time to work on it.  Ray III
Posted by: LMS6100 Posted on: Aug 30th, 2012, 6:56pm
Bill,
 
 I had the pleasure of visiting with Ray last weekend and the subject of piston rings came up. After hearing how well teflon rings worked in Ray's engine I'd like to give them a try but can't locate them in the Grainger catalog. Could you  give me a part number or catalog page number?
 
Thanks, Steve
Posted by: BandM_Jim Posted on: Jun 3rd, 2014, 11:28am
Hi Ray -  
 
I've been watching your boiler build for years.  I liked the start of the hopper building thread.  Any chance you will continue with that thread ?
 
Thanks for sharing your boiler building experiences.
 
    - Jimi -
    Harvard, MA
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Jun 19th, 2014, 6:22pm
on Jun 3rd, 2014, 11:28am, BandM_Jim wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Hi Ray -  
 
I've been watching your boiler build for years.  I liked the start of the hopper building thread.  Any chance you will continue with that thread ?
 
Thanks for sharing your boiler building experiences.
 
    - Jimi -
    Harvard, MA

 
jimi:  i know that ray has been unusually busy, but you have a point...i'd love to see him building more hoppers.  when i get a chance to talk to him, i'll ask.
Posted by: kapullen Posted on: Jun 27th, 2014, 9:33am
Ray,
 
We just went thru a similar process on maybe the same engine in Maryland.
This engine locked up on it's second trip around the CALS track.
The owner decided to replace the brass liners with cast iron liners
and proper cast iron rings. This process took several months
off and on. I can post some photos and the process if anyone is interested.
 
Kap
 
 
 
 
This picture shows the final result of the overhaul.
 
Posted by: kapullen Posted on: Jun 30th, 2014, 8:49am
Here is the left cylinder as received.
 

 
This engine came to be as a casting set from a vendor at train mountain.
It was in the works for several years and survived a bankrupsy
at the first shop that machined the castings.
 
It was finished machined, and assembled by another shop west of here (east coast).
The workmanshop on the running gearlooks nice and crisp.
 
Whom ever fabricated this engine could jump in and enlighten us  
a bit more about it's history.
 
 
I disconnected an oil line fitting in the smokebox and rotated the pump  
and got a bit of water then nothing from the line.
 

 
The pump had oil in it.
 
The liners both sides, and pistons were brass, or bronze
with nice gall marks in them.
 
The rings were "plastic" as received, with a wave spring underneath
to load them.
 
 
 
Posted by: kapullen Posted on: Jul 1st, 2014, 1:34pm

 
When I received it the mechanism was free, and guides appeared to be setup right but maybe a tad tight.
 
 
Mike at the club had  taken this engine apart and found that over sized (2.5 or larger) automotive rings
were used. These had been gaped to go in the 2.375 diameter cylinder. He had to pry them out of the grooves.
 
You can reduce a rings diameter a a couple thou, but not 1/8 of an inch.
That extreme reduction will give excess pressure at the gaps and a couple other areas.
 
The gall marks appear randomly spaced around the cylinder.
 
 

 
Mike installed the plastic ones and advised the owner to run it.
It probably would have been fine for a couple years anyway.
 
The owner wanted the liners removed, and replaced with Cast Iron.
 
I tried to pull the brass liners with a 4140 all thread rod
and nuts. That was not successful.
 
Then I looked for a porta power rental with an industrial
twin ram jack setup.
 
No one in this town has one. The twin setup allows you to  
put a draw bolt thru the center hole of the jack, and pull liners, bearings
or whatever with minimum head room.
 
The twin ram setup costs $650+ so I opted to make a twin ram.
 

 
 
I built a twin cylinder jack from a piece of cast iron bar and
pieces of crs bar as pistons, and cross bar.
 
This is to work with my brand new Harbor Freight
Hydraulic Jack.
 
This engine like most, was designed to allow room behind the front beam  
to get a line boring rig in for overhauling the cylinders.
 
First day I looked at the engine I crawled to the fromt of the trailer
to check this space out. I didn't want to get involved in removing the front  
end of an engine to work on the cylinders.
 
 
This, the twin jack, was un successful too. I didn't want to force the  
issue and break the block.
 
I always have in the back of my mind how brittle
cast iron is and handle it with care.
 
I worked cast iron castings for many years and have seen a couple  
expensive castings broken.  
 
I have since found the liners to be loctited in place.
They may have even been allowed to float in place in the goo.
 
I built a liner splitter from a Harbor Freight arbor press (2 ton). The rack and pinion
were mounted in a bushing to act as a hand operated broaching tool.
A few new teeth had to be added to the jack ram to get enough stroke
with the cutting tool. The shaper made quick work of the new teeth.
 
 
 
 
The cutting tool is held in a square hole bushing loctited in the jacks ram.  
 
The square hole bushing has a thread in one end allowing advancing of the tool for each pass.
 
Back in the day, these bushings were used to fabricate all manner of boring bars, and cutters
to match the application.
 
 
 

 
 
Here is the splitter in the bore.
 
Once the liners were slotted thru, I put some pressure on the left liner with the  
jack.   It did not immediately break loose. After about five minutes a popping sound occured.
Inspection revealed the left hand liner had moved about 3/8 inch.
 
 
Posted by: kapullen Posted on: Jul 1st, 2014, 1:51pm
Here is the splitter at work.
 
www.youtube.com/watch?v=H48xz4QJB9E
Posted by: Henry Posted on: Jul 1st, 2014, 2:02pm
That's quite a job. Very interesting.
 
Henry
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Jul 2nd, 2014, 10:59am
Kap,
Very interesting method for removing the liner.  
Question: did you consider heating the casting to "kill" the loctite bond? This might not have been possible without removing the cylinders from the loco.
Posted by: kapullen Posted on: Jul 3rd, 2014, 12:13pm
Dan,  
Yes, I thought about heat, and also about stuffing dry ice in the liner to shrink
it.  
Didn't want to mess the paint up any more than necessary with heat.
Glad I went this way because the block has tapered bores and I pulled the liners out the small end!
kap
Posted by: kapullen Posted on: Jul 3rd, 2014, 12:21pm

 
Once the liners were slotted thru, I put some pressure on the left liner with the  
jack. It did not immediately break loose. After about five minutes a popping sound occured.
Inspection revealed the left hand liner had moved about 3/8 inch.
 
 

 
 
It was then a matter of jacking the liner out using the grade 8  1/2" thread, hardened nuts
and cast iron jacking spacers made for the job.
 
 
Upon measureing the bores, I found the bores in the casting were tapered.
The left side tapered .006" and the right tapered .011".
 
I had pulled them out the small end!
 
They were large in the rear end of the block. Evidently tool wear caused the  
tapered bores.
 
The new liners had to be individualy made to match the different tapered bores.
These were easily programmed and turned on my Prototrak CNC lathe.
 
The liners were installed using the trusty grade 8 all thread rod, and nuts to pull them in place.  
 
I allowed about .001-.002 press fit in the bores. New 2.375 cast iron rings  
came from OTTO GAS ENGINE WORKS. They are located in Elkton Maryland and stock many
sizes and styles of rings from model sizes to 80 plus inches.
 
    www.ringspacers.com
 
The home made rings were not to spec.
 

 
The rabbit on the right head in the bore was loose. This would cause problems with  
future assembly, and crosshead guide bar resetting.
I used my put-on tool to displace some metal on the rabbit diameter and remachined it for a neat fit.
 
 
Fitting the guides.
 
I run the piston all the way into the bore, and shim the cross head end guide bar for.002 clearance.
Set the other end, crosshead all the way out, splitting the difference in any free motion of the crosshead
and setting the same clearance. Re check from end to end until ok and tighten if prefered.
 
A new Little Engines oil pump is mounted on the far side from the non working pump.
 
In the garage with a blanket and 100 watt light bulb to keep her warm.
 
 
 

 
 
We arrived at the track Sunday and started a fire with some wood blocks. After a while we noticed the  
grate support bars weren't in the hanger rings. Had to lift the grate and guide the pin  
and tap the other side to go in the hole.
 
By that time the pressure was up and the water appeared low. The injector showed no sign of life and the only pump  
is a twin axle pump under the engine.  We pulled the fire with the shovel with 100# pressure.  
The injector sputtered to life.
 
The water glass returned to 3/4 full after blowing the glass down.
 
We had killed the fire for nothing.
 
The drain cocks are stopped up. We eased the engine back and forth with a little steam but mostly pushing to warm the cylinders.
 
A couple steam pipes are split to the whistle and brakes from the two cold winters.
 
 
Finially Dave, the owner got on and ran most of the afternoon without a hitch.
The twin boiler pump and injector were then working.
 
 
Being that it was private club run day, he went without brakes. There is always reverse anyway.
We have a couple issues to work on, and a new set of stainless grates to fabricate.  
 
Kap
 
 
Posted by: Dan Watson Posted on: Jul 4th, 2014, 11:22am
Wow, that turned out to be quite a job! Sounds like it went the way a lot of my projects go: everything goes smoothly until you start!
Posted by: kapullen Posted on: Jul 7th, 2014, 3:17pm
Dan,
 
Funny,
 
I thought I'd just have to pull them out with a piece of acme threaded rod, and a bit of dry ice,  make the new iron one's, and pull them  in!
 
It took a while to think up that Harbor Fright broach rig.
 
I got lots of advise from many different people like Van Norman boring heads,
and line boring rigs.  That broach tool seemed the best way to go.
 
Now I have an extra arbor press to junk up the shop.
 
Kap
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 28th, 2014, 12:04pm
Kap
 Looks like you had to deal with the same problems I experienced.  I enjoyed the pictures and explanation of your fix.  Im glad I did not have to change out the liners. Not yet anyway.  Ray III  
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Jul 28th, 2014, 12:13pm
BandM_Jim
 I definitely plan on building the hoppers. Not exactly sure when , hopefully in the next year. I will post pics of my progress as I go. So many projects and never enough time. I still need to finish the mike, and I plan on rebuilding the Raritan this winter, with hopes of taking it to train mountain next year. Im glad you enjoyed the boiler build project.  Ray III  on Jun 3rd, 2014, 11:28am, BandM_Jim wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Hi Ray -  
 
I've been watching your boiler build for years.  I liked the start of the hopper building thread.  Any chance you will continue with that thread ?
 
Thanks for sharing your boiler building experiences.
 
    - Jimi -
    Harvard, MA

Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 16th, 2014, 11:44pm
I have finally started the cab.  Mocking up with poster board. Then use those as templates to be cut out in steel. Ray III
Posted by: Pennsy4483 Posted on: Aug 18th, 2014, 9:27am
Looking good Ray!  Keep up the good work and keep the photos coming.
 
Don
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Aug 30th, 2014, 11:32pm
That is great Ray! I can't wait to see it finished!
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 4th, 2017, 9:20pm
I have not posted on here in quite a while.  I now have the cab , and IC pilot finished.   The I also have blocks welded to the boiler and bands welded to the blocks. This will hold the jacket to the proper OD.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 4th, 2017, 9:21pm
Cab , and bands ready for a jacket.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 4th, 2017, 9:23pm
Cab
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 4th, 2017, 9:24pm
Cab
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 4th, 2017, 9:28pm
IC pilot. I had to make 2 different dies to press the 2 different  size ribs for this pilot.  Ray III
Posted by: BobbyT Posted on: Aug 7th, 2017, 4:58pm
Ray, the cab looks fantastic.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 8th, 2017, 7:13pm
Thanks Bobby.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 8th, 2017, 10:00pm
All welded, just needs to be cleaned up, before painting.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 8th, 2017, 10:10pm
Almost finished.
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 8th, 2017, 10:11pm
Actual IC pilot.
Posted by: Henry Posted on: Aug 9th, 2017, 12:05am
That looks great Ray!
 
Henry
Posted by: SteamHeaton Posted on: Aug 9th, 2017, 12:29am
Thank you Henry.  It's been fun starting to work on the cosmetic part of this build now.  Ray III
Posted by: moose_the_caboose Posted on: Aug 9th, 2017, 5:05pm
Losing the neked chicken look!  Great!
 
Looking for a third party hosting site for all my pics...suggestions?
 
moose
Posted by: tomc Posted on: Aug 10th, 2017, 12:21pm
Moosey, look into Flickr.  I use it but get it free from AT&T with my account.
 
Tom C.