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CBQ/Burlington #7 Wood Beam Trucks!
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   Author  Topic: CBQ/Burlington #7 Wood Beam Trucks!  (Read 2972 times)
moose_the_caboose
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CBQ/Burlington #7 Wood Beam Trucks!
 
« on: Jun 13th, 2010, 9:44pm »
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hi all,
 
i've started this thread for my friend dale(steam290).  dale's work is too valuable to be lost within the forty-some-odd pages of the 'moose' thread.  so...please make him welcome in his 'new' home!
 
dale:  i'm copying all prior posts about the journey you've under taken, but the floor is yours, sir.
 
moose


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moose_the_caboose
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Re: CBQ/Burlington #7 Wood Beam Trucks!
 
« Reply #1 on: Jun 13th, 2010, 9:56pm »
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Hi Dick,  
 
I was running through this thread and your passenger car truck construction caught my attention. I am in the initial phases of building some wood beam caboose trucks. I have attached a picture of my pedestal design. I have been using AutoCAD's 3d capabilities. Did you do your own design and have them cast? Same with the journal boxes? One of my next steps is to draw up a journal box.  
 
Did you cast any extra journal boxes? If you were willing and I could piggyback off your efforts, I'd appreciate not having to draw up a journal box and reinvent the wheel so to speak.  
 
Are you going to use roller bearings or a fluid film bearing in your boxes. I'd love to hear more on your design.  
 
Thanks,  
 
Dale  
 
on Dec 16th, 2009, 3:35am, Dick_Morris wrote:  (Click here for original message)Life got in the way for most of the summer, but I've finally had some time to spend on rail projects. In the photo I'm starting to fit the parts together for my eighth scale, 7 foot wheelbase passenger car truck. The only parts shown that didn't come to me as raw material are the bolts and nuts. I'll be using the same parts to build a pair of 6 foot wheelbase caboose trucks for a circa 1870 Central Pacific caboose. The prototype drawings are from "Railway Car Construction," William Voss, 1892 and reprinted by Newton Gregg as "Train Shed Cyclopedia," No. 39.  
 
Moose, sorry to hear that health issues sidelined you but glad to hear you are on the mend. I just reread this entire caboose thread as well as the other car building material you wrote in the Largo thread. I'm looking forward to your future efforts.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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moose_the_caboose
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Re: CBQ/Burlington #7 Wood Beam Trucks!
 
« Reply #2 on: Jun 13th, 2010, 10:00pm »
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I based the pedestals on a Master Car Builder's standard design. They were published in several volumes of the Car Builder's Cyclopedia. Google Books has several volumes, including 1895. The pedestal is at Figure 5481.  
 
I made patterns and cast my own. There are a couple of photos of the patterns and castings as well as one of the prototype drawings in this thread - http://forums.railfan.net/forums.cgi?board=LiveSteam;action=display;num=1244324352;start=  
 
The journal boxes are from another MCB drawing from a Cyclopedia.  
 
The castings are pretty close to scale but I fudged a bit and made the jaw slightly overscale to fit the bearings. I'm using 3/8" ID by 7/8" OD ball bearings.  (From an ebay description - 1604 2RS Double Sealed Bearing 3/8" x 7/8" x 11/32".) The pedestal jaw opening is a few thousandths wider than 1" and the journals are 1". These are the only ball bearings that I've found that allow the journals to be pretty close to scale. Others have used needle bearings sucessfully but I have a hang-up about the possibility of dirt getting into them. Hopefully the 1" width leaves enough wall thickness that I won't wear through the sides too quickly. Although the axle diameter may seem small, it steps up to about 7/8" next to the bearing. I checked the specs on the bearing and was comfortable that eight of these bearings would carry the weight of my cars which are relatively early designs and fairly small.  
 
I didn't cast any extras. In fact I need to cast some more. I had to make a bit of a detour to make a better foundry. I was using a hot plate, propane torch, and stainless steel sauce pan for the relatively low temperature alloy I used. It worked OK but was slow and not very efficient. The first batch of castings were pretty labor intensive, expecially the cores. I'm doing some different things with the second batch that should make the castings less labor intensive. However, I'm not sure I want to make  more castings than I plan on needing for my own projects. At eight per car, they add up quickly. I made an RTV mold of master wooden pattern and the actual patterns are urethane resin castings. I might be willing to pour an extra pattern or two if you want to pursue casting your own.  
 
Both the pedestals and journals started life as a chunk of plywood or MDF with a photocopy of the prototype drawing at the right scale glued onto them. After cutting them to the rough size and shape, the final shaping was done with a table top belt sander and some sand paper and the other bits were glued in place until they looked like the appropriate part. I just marked up the protype drawings with the (more or less) scale dimensions for my working drawings for making the patterns and machining the castings. I can probably make a copy of the annotated drawings.  
   
A while back I started a thread on cars for the Alaska Central RR. My plan is to describe building the trucks and then go onto the frames and car bodies as I build them, but I haven't been able to dedicate any further time to it. So many projects - so little time.  
 
Your drawings look good. There is one thing I did differently. Instead of having the journal bear only on the inside and outside edge of the pedestal, I left the inside of my pedestal jaws flat so there is contact all the way across. I think this will give me a larger wearing surface and this area will be hidden when the truck is assembled.  
 
 
 
« Last Edit: Apr 18th, 2010, 10:41pm by Dick_Morris »  Logged  
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dick Morris
Anchorage, Alaska  
 
 
 


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moose_the_caboose
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Re: CBQ/Burlington #7 Wood Beam Trucks!
 
« Reply #3 on: Jun 13th, 2010, 10:00pm »
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Hi Dick,  
 
Thanks for all the great tidbits of info. I also looked at the other thread that you referred to. I am impressed with all of the casting work that everyone is doing.  
 
Wish I was closer to you. I'd volunteer as a helper to give you a hand just to see how you did it all and gain some experience.  
 
I do see what you mean about the bearing sizes. Those bearings you found on Ebay are quite reasonable. My pedestal scaled down ends up being 0.950". So at this point, I'm not sure which way I'm going to go.  
 
There are other later edition car builder's cyclopedias available at www.archive.org.  
 
Dale  
 
Also with too many projects and too little time.  


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moose_the_caboose
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Re: CBQ/Burlington #7 Wood Beam Trucks!
 
« Reply #4 on: Jun 13th, 2010, 10:03pm »
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Hey Moose, or anyone out there,  
 
There was mention of the MCC express and caboose truck. Can anyone tell me what kind of clearance they have between the pedestals and the journal boxes in both across track and in line with track. In other words, if you are looking down, in the X and Y directions? Hate to go buy a set just for research.  
 
Been working on my beloved Burlington # 7 truck design and couldn't come up with a drawing for the journal box. So I am melding, or is that welding, from car builder's cyclopedia drawings and what drawings I do have of the # 7 truck.  
 
I have several of the wood components dimensioned and have started on a wood prototype. I am investigating commercial and home casting for the obviously cast parts. Anyone in the Atlanta area doing casting?  
 
As I progress pictures will be forthcoming. I am still working on trying to resaw crooked lumber without a jointer, planer, or bandsaw.  
 
Here's a picture of my 3d design. Welcome to my madness.  
 
Dale  
 

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moose_the_caboose
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Re: CBQ/Burlington #7 Wood Beam Trucks!
 
« Reply #5 on: Jun 13th, 2010, 10:04pm »
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hi all,  
 
dale: boy, you're gettin' closer!  nice work!  now...about your questions.  the bobber caboose is still in the shop and its under-carriage is mcc box-n-pedestal (looks over-scale, maybe 1.75" or 2" scale) and i've still got a set of 1.5" scale box-n-pedestals from loco parts (i think) that i'll measure for you in the next couple days.    
 
keep up the good work.  
 
moose  
 
on Jun 2nd, 2010, 9:53pm, Steam290 wrote:  (Click here for original message)Hey Moose, or anyone out there,  
 
There was mention of the MCC express and caboose truck. Can anyone tell me what kind of clearance they have between the pedestals and the journal boxes in both across track and in line with track. In other words, if you are looking down, in the X and Y directions? Hate to go buy a set just for research.  
 
Been working on my beloved Burlington # 7 truck design and couldn't come up with a drawing for the journal box. So I am melding, or is that welding, from car builder's cyclopedia drawings and what drawings I do have of the # 7 truck.  
 
I have several of the wood components dimensioned and have started on a wood prototype. I am investigating commercial and home casting for the obviously cast parts. Anyone in the Atlanta area doing casting?  
 
As I progress pictures will be forthcoming. I am still working on trying to resaw crooked lumber without a jointer, planer, or bandsaw.  
 
Here's a picture of my 3d design. Welcome to my madness.  
 
Dale  
 


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moose_the_caboose
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Re: CBQ/Burlington #7 Wood Beam Trucks!
 
« Reply #6 on: Jun 13th, 2010, 10:06pm »
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More forward progress. Here's the wheelpieces and the transoms cut out. No holes yet.  
 
I've been using a dial vernier to lay out the cut lines. I've also been using a digital caliper to set up my fence on the table saw.  
 
As far as the metal parts, what materials are journal boxes, pedestals, and other parts typically made of in this scale? Cast Iron, Zinc, aluminum, steel. I would think casting steel would be the best but most expensive. Aluminum for a sliding surface such as a journal riding in a pedestal would be a poor choice I think. Cast iron would seem to make sense to me. If something wore out, brazing could be used to build up the surface and it could be remachined.  
 
Dale  
 
 


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moose_the_caboose
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Re: CBQ/Burlington #7 Wood Beam Trucks!
 
« Reply #7 on: Jun 13th, 2010, 10:08pm »
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A pic of my dial surface gauge and laying out.  
 
Dale  
 


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moose_the_caboose
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Re: CBQ/Burlington #7 Wood Beam Trucks!
 
« Reply #8 on: Jun 13th, 2010, 10:09pm »
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Dale, I'm gonna run my mug into this one and ol' moosey can counter, if he so desires. Just about all of the materials mentioned have been used, with varying degrees of success. Aluminum is frequently used (a p poor choice imho). There is a left coast mfg that actually uses aluminum in pedestal type locomotive journal boxes! Most 1.5 journal boxes use ball bearing inserts, although some notables actually use half-brasses.  
 
For a pedestal type box, like you're doing and I have coming down the pike at me, steel, cast iron or bronze would be suitable, with one caveat; design in and use a sacrificial wear surface at the "interface"  
 
Nice height gauge.  
 
At the risk of becoming a PITA and wearing out my welcome, I feel obliged to comment on your choice of wood. There is a significant mass involved with these cars and the kinetic energy that goes with it. Wht you are using appears to be fir, pine or spruce. If I'm wrong, ignore the following. You may wish you had chosen a nice, straight grained hardwood and studied it for grain orientation. That wavy grain, especially when weakened by fastener holes, is very subject to separation.  
 
I do not mean to offend by the above comments, but save you from the same learning misadventures that many of us have experienced.  
 
Greg B.  


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moose_the_caboose
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Re: CBQ/Burlington #7 Wood Beam Trucks!
 
« Reply #9 on: Jun 13th, 2010, 10:10pm »
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No offense taken. This is my first foray into the abyss.    
 
This is my "prototype" - or learning curve. I am going to attempt to make all my mistakes on this and then build with white oak. White oak I understand is strong and has a closed cell or closed fiber. My terminology is probably incorrect. But it will not wick up moisture like most other woods. It's moisture absorption properties are more like cedar. I will also be paying more attention to the grain and will not have knots. It will get painted also. Better to hide deformities ---    
 
I welcome all comments,  
 
Dale  


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moose_the_caboose
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Re: CBQ/Burlington #7 Wood Beam Trucks!
 
« Reply #10 on: Jun 13th, 2010, 10:10pm »
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Dale,  
I'm glad that you were not offended, because none was intended. Some people are a little "thin skinned" when it comes to recieving constructive criticism.  
 
White Oak is an excellent choice, for the very reasons you stated. The grain is a bit coarse, for the rivet counters. If you are near any large boat yards, you would probably be surprised at the teak and mahogony "scraps" that they discard. Also, some of the fruit woods are suitable, like some pears and apples. In addition, if you are in the South (Dixie), you might find some salvage Long Leaf Yellow Pine (not the crap from the big box stores. It's strong, dense and, when quarter sawn, a beautiful wood. Just pay attention to the grain structure in what ever you choose.  
 
Hope I have helped,  
Greg B.  


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moose_the_caboose
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Re: CBQ/Burlington #7 Wood Beam Trucks!
 
« Reply #11 on: Jun 13th, 2010, 10:11pm »
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hi all,  
 
dale:  your work is wonderful!  and btw, it deserves to be shown and spoken of in its own thread!  sooooo my friend, you can start one yourself or let me know what you want to call it and i'll do it.  i'll also copy and paste all the posts referenced here to the new thread.  your efforts are too nice and too valuable to be lost in all the 'moosey stuff'.    
 
while we've never met, please know how much i would like to scare you in the dark and sit with you over more than one cup of coffee next time i'm in north georgia, as pockets would say.  
 
working with you and charlie in future is going to be a hoot!  
 
moose  
 
on Jun 2nd, 2010, 9:53pm, Steam290 wrote:  (Click here for original message)Hey Moose, or anyone out there,  
 
There was mention of the MCC express and caboose truck. Can anyone tell me what kind of clearance they have between the pedestals and the journal boxes in both across track and in line with track. In other words, if you are looking down, in the X and Y directions? Hate to go buy a set just for research.  
 
Been working on my beloved Burlington # 7 truck design and couldn't come up with a drawing for the journal box. So I am melding, or is that welding, from car builder's cyclopedia drawings and what drawings I do have of the # 7 truck.  
 
I have several of the wood components dimensioned and have started on a wood prototype. I am investigating commercial and home casting for the obviously cast parts. Anyone in the Atlanta area doing casting?  
 
As I progress pictures will be forthcoming. I am still working on trying to resaw crooked lumber without a jointer, planer, or bandsaw.  
 
Here's a picture of my 3d design. Welcome to my madness.  
 
Dale  
 


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moose_the_caboose
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Re: CBQ/Burlington #7 Wood Beam Trucks!
 
« Reply #12 on: Jun 13th, 2010, 10:12pm »
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On another board Jack Bodenmann used maple for wooden parts on an early tender truck he is building. I've used red oak on the passenger truck parts I've been working on, but maple seems to be a better choice. I used maple for bolsters on an early style truck that I partially built several years ago and I think I agree with Jack. Oak is tough, but it has a coarse grain which tends to deflect a drill into the softer parts of the grain. I've also had some problems with it splitting along the grain during some machining operations.  
 
I started to design around mortices and even bought a mortising attachment. After further thought, I decided to use dowell pins as they are hidden and should be take a lot less time to machine than mortice and tenon joints.  
 
There are an awful lot of holes in a single side frame. I'm assuming you'll be using a drill jig to drill your holes once you have the details worked out. They can be used to accurately locate the bolt holes as well as dowel pins. I don't know if this is already your plan, but using patterns and a router with a guide bearing will let you do the final shaping to turn identical parts out quickly.  
 
The prototypes have several thicknesses of boards and in my opinion, avoiding nominal 1" lumber increases the wow factor. I coughed up the money for a table top planer and I'm glad I did. My early efforts with it were a bit of a disappointment, but after doing some Internet research and making some adjustments it does what I want. With a little trial and error I can set it to within a few thousandths of the desired thickness. I've even thought about fitting a cheap dial indicator to make it easier to set the thickness.  
 
On material for the the journals and pedestals, aluminum is used on many of the commercial trucks for the sliding joint between the bolster and bolster guide bars. It also tends to be a wear point as aluminum on aluminum isn't a good combination for a bearing surface. It can gaul and is also a bit soft. The ZA alloys are suppose have good bearing qualities, but I haven't found anything saying whether ZA against ZA is an acceptable combination. I guess I'll find out. Sand cast iron doesn't have the sharp detail the I want and I don't have a way to melt it, so it isn't an option. Silicon bronze is supposed to be a good material and should be good working against itself, but costs are higher than ZA or aluminum and it casts at a higher temperature than the other two materials. An advantage of bronze is that you can silver solder simple castings together to make complex assemblies.  
 
I initially planned to use 1/4" plate for the equalizers and seperate castings for the spring mounts. Not having a cheap source of plate nor a fast way to cut it, I tried bar stock with triangles cut at the bends, the bends put into place, and then welding them. Way too time consuming. My current plan is to use aluminum castings to give a good appearance with  effective use of my time.  
 
(I'm assuming this and some of my other posts will follow your posts when you get your own thread.)  


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moose_the_caboose
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Re: CBQ/Burlington #7 Wood Beam Trucks!
 
« Reply #13 on: Jun 13th, 2010, 10:13pm »
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Dick,  
I've thought about this for a few days; I lay no claim to expertise, only experience with the associated scars. We've spoken, electronically, for some time and I am amazed that we could be diametrically opposed on so many materials. Red Oak and Maple? Aluminum, in this application? We do agree on Jack Bodenman's phenominal ability. I don't always agree with his choice of material. He also bounces from scale to scale and what might be acceptable in one scale is totally inappropriate in another.  
 
Dick, this is not a flame. Don't go off in a huff, or anything. I  still have a lot of respect for your input. In fact, that's the main reason I responded at all.  
 
Greg B.  


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moose_the_caboose
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Re: CBQ/Burlington #7 Wood Beam Trucks!
 
« Reply #14 on: Jun 13th, 2010, 11:02pm »
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hi all,
 
we are back live again!  if i've missed any back-posts, please be sure and let me know.  
 
dale:  it's all yours!
 
to all:  i've been sortta quiet on the subject of woods for the #7's beams.  having come from a family of woodworkers and 'wrights, you have to be adept at picking the right wood for the job at hand.  maple was suggested, why not it?  it's readily available with plenty of sub-species, but....it's primarily used as a furniture wood and needs sheltering to remain viable.  can you use it?  yes, but you must keep it treated again moisture.  which maple to use.  'rock' maple or 'hard' maple, but watch for quarter sawn lumber.  the 'runout' of slabbed maple means your beam will be weak.  'pretty' or 'figured' maples don't necessarily have the strength of grain you want.  how about oak?  only white oak has the strength of grain to do what you want effectively...,but the grain structure is too course to look right or machine properly.  red oak makes pretty furniture, but the grain structure is too loose and too open to be used to best advantage.    fruit woods have also been mentioned, what are they?  how about cherry wood, apple wood, persimmon wood (golf clubs), mulberry wood, etc..etc.  each of these woods would do the trick, but they all must be treated for moisture and grain runout just like maple.    
 
this discussion can go on infinitum, but the real question is, what's available to you?  my voice goes towards finding a resinous wood that has a fine grain structure, is dimensionally stable in your climate, and is straight grained(quarter sawn - think musical instrument wood grains).  my choices if i had the availability:
 
1. cherry
2. hornbeam (boxwood)
3. honduran mahogany
4. old growth engelman spruce (yes i know it's soft wood, but resin and grain give it strength).
5. brown ebony (expensive and hazardous to work with, but durable and very tight grained.  available at luthiers' supply houses)
 
more when i'm not soo tired!
 
moose


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Dick_Morris
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Re: CBQ/Burlington #7 Wood Beam Trucks!
 
« Reply #15 on: Jun 14th, 2010, 11:14pm »
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Greg - No offense taken.  
 
As for red oak, I'd go with the advice to use white oak if it was reasonably easy to obtain.  In Alaska, even in the "big city" of Anchorage, you use what you can get from normal retail outlets. If I can't find something locally and it doesn't fit into a flat rate priority mail box I expect to pay at least a dollar a pound for shipping - and more if something is oversized. (As an aside, I want a finger brake and several months ago checked into shipping for one from one of the big tool suppliers that caters to hobbyests. The cost was about $550 with free shipping to the Lower 48. For "international" crating and shipping to Alaska they wanted another $600.)  
 
I was going to ask about your reluctance with maple, but George explained. His points are well taken. I picked through the stack to find pieces of maple that were straight grained and with the grain parallel to the board. I'll take his advice to be careful about sealing it against the weather - I'm not above learning something new.  .  
 
Concerning aluminum as a material for truck parts, you won't get a glowing recommendation from me - Quote:
It also tends to be a wear point as aluminum on aluminum isn't a good combination for a bearing surface. It can gaul and is also a bit soft.

The zinc-aluminum alloys are supposed to have good bearing qualities and are fairly easy to pour, so I'm giving it a try for the passenger pedestals and journals. The actual bearings are ball bearings - I don't like getting onto my hands and knees to oil journals. Hopefully the rubbing surface between the two ZA parts will wear well better than aluminum against aluminum. For non-bearing parts and larger parts such as a Bettendorf truck frame I would still compromise on aluminum because dinged wheels are readily available and a lot cheaper than buying and shipping ZA alloy.  
 
So I'll conclude with the following disclaimer - The best practices and materials available to me may not be the best practices and materials available to everyone.  Feel free to criticize or advise - we can all learn from the discussion.  
 
 


« Last Edit: Jun 14th, 2010, 11:38pm by Dick_Morris » Logged
pockets
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Re: CBQ/Burlington #7 Wood Beam Trucks!
 
« Reply #16 on: Jun 15th, 2010, 8:14am »
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Dick,
I'm pleased that no offence was taken. I am much more the student than the teacher, but when I've been bitten, I like to warn people about the dog!
 
We have discussed the ZA alloys, before. I will be very interested in the outcome of your experiments regarding its bearing qualities. Maybe I'm just a crusty old fart, but I am still a believer in the sacrificial wear surfaces between two moving parts.
 
Greg B.


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moose_the_caboose
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Re: CBQ/Burlington #7 Wood Beam Trucks!
 
« Reply #17 on: Jun 16th, 2010, 8:36pm »
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hi all,
 
dale:  i haven't forgotten about the measurements that you need...i'll have the time i need to get them on friday morning.  hang in there!
 
to all:  while the subject of woods may sound arcane and beyond the needs of the average builder, the discussion is no less important.  to know what wood to use for a project will aid in the construction and long life of the object built.  don't have the money for the exotic woods?  learn the types of wood that are prevalent in your locale and how early carpenters and 'wrights used them.  they solved some of the same problems long before you came along.
 
a short illustration of what i mean, while not about live steam, relevant just the same.  many years ago, my grandfather (and his ancestors before him) worked as a carpenter, millwright, and boatwright(small commercial vessels).  during one of the hardest times of the depression, his family was left with little money, little food, and many mouths a-hungerin'.  having sold all his boats earlier in the year to provide groceries, he had no way to even go fishing.  my grandmother told him in fabled-unrepeatable-terms that he had to build a boat and fish(they lived in a small coastal fishing village).  she fully expected the family would be hungry for a couple of days until the boat was built.  before sunrise the next morning, he was about his work out in his wood yard.  at that time, no one could afford commercial lumber yard prices so you timbered what you needed.  from his wood yard, he selected what he needed and went to work....hand tools only, no power tools in those days.   by mid-afternoon, the boat was finished enough to be useful.  it was placed on wooden rollers and rolled down to the water.  at that point, it was sunk and weighted for the rest of the afternoon.  he fished out of it that night...the family had food on the table.
 
for those who've built wood boats before, you know how good your carpentry has to be just to get it to stay together, much less float.  then there's the caulking that has to be done to keep it water-tight.  my grandfather's boat wasn't caulked.  how did he do it?  how did it stay water-tight?  he knew his woods, he knew what he could do to get his joinery to last and he knew his family would go hungry if he failed.
 
the wood was river cypress....now, can you guess why it worked?
it's why it is beyond just helpfull, knowledge is the power you weild.  knowing the right wood for the task at hand helps keep you from relying on something that may prove unreliable and dangerous to yourself as well as others around you.
 
moose


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moose_the_caboose
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Re: CBQ/Burlington #7 Wood Beam Trucks!
 
« Reply #18 on: Jun 18th, 2010, 7:13pm »
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dale:  check your email...there's some data awaiting you.
 
moose


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Steam290
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Re: CBQ Burlington #7 Wood Beam Trucks!
  assembly_-_scaled_1_6_-_ver_114_Journal_Box_1.jpg - 136854 Bytes
« Reply #19 on: Jul 21st, 2010, 5:55pm »
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Well I've been a little quiet here lately. But I do continue to make forward progress. I ran across an AutoCAD bug that was driving me nuts. I think it's a bug. I have to redo my assembly drawings. The "full size" components are fine.  
 
I also was trying to draw a complex item. Got buried in that and decided to come up for air and work my journal box instead.  
 
I went to Colorado for vacation. I went caboose hunting. I found two and took a great number of detail pictures and had at least two A-HAs; now I understand. I even found one pedestal with CB&N cast in it. Now that's old. The pedestals went through several revisions. Not really important. I am going to cast, or get cast what might be termed rev A with the CB&Q and pattern number cast in it.  
 
I also found a roller bearing that is 3/4" OD, 1/2" ID, dynamic load is 238 lbs, static is 112. More than enough for a caboose, but a little lighter than I would like. I would like to have this design be able to hold up to shorty passenger car use.
 
I am now ready for material selection and starting down the road of getting the pedestal and journal box cast.  
 
I decided to set the clearance between the box and pedestal at 1/32" total in the direction parallel to track and 1/16" total across track.
 
Dale
 



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