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the little known electrics
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   Author  Topic: the little known electrics  (Read 908 times)
green_elite_cab
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Posts: 1212
the little known electrics
 
« on: Aug 21st, 2005, 9:00pm »
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it seems the majority of this forum is all GG-1, with a helping of E-60 and some random toasters.  what about the other guys? there are loads of them that never quite made it, especialy modern ones.   like the GM-10, for example. i don't know if this was meant for the US or not, but EMD built this odd locomotive.  its sits on 3 b-b trucks... certainly strange
 

 
here is a E-25B used by texas utilities i'm guessing for coal.
 

 
and here is the E50C, which seems to be little known to.
 

 
 
the list goes on.  its strange that electrication hasn't really caught on yet....


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RARITAN_CLOCKER
Former Member
Re: the little known electrics
 
« Reply #1 on: Aug 23rd, 2005, 1:47am »
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                                                 Europe has a rich history of "oddball" electrics, that few American railfans have even heard of, unless they are also interested in European railways. In 1954, the SNCF (French National Railways) introduced a center-cab, two-hooded electric, the 12000 B-B class. These fearsome looking locomotives were designed for freight trains, and represented the start of major monophase-current electricfications using industrial frequencies on the Valenciennes-Thionville main line, intitially scheduled for 1,500 volts DC service. Another classic European electrical monster was "The Crocodile", first used on Swiss railways in 1920. This engine had side-rods in place of gears and was a formidable piece of machinery that ran in service for many decades. And one of the most unusual-looking (and fearsome) electrics was the Ganz Type 2-B-B-2, another vintage French electric. Dating from 1926, these fascinating engines had large wheels and connecting rods, with thier long cowling extending towards the front and rear, and thier central cabs had large porthole windows for the engineers. Only two of these massive machines were built.

« Last Edit: Aug 23rd, 2005, 1:49am by RARITAN_CLOCKER » Logged
George_Harris
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Posts: 3825
Re: the little known electrics
 
« Reply #2 on: Aug 23rd, 2005, 5:22am »
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I f you want some good information on electrics, I suggest you get your hands on the latest (Fall 2005) Classic Trains.  It has a goodly chunk of the magazine given over to Electric Freight.  Usully can't even find it here, but got one in a bookstore here today!
 
George


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GP72ACe

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Re: the little known electrics
 
« Reply #3 on: Aug 27th, 2005, 8:10pm »
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Quote:
it seems the majority of this forum is all GG-1, with a helping of E-60 and some random toasters
No, not really...we do get into the New Haven's EP-series (which gave birth to the GG1), some of PRR's oddballs (the R1, which looked like the GG1 since it shared the same Raymond Loewy body style but was a 2-D-2, and the DD2, which was one of the prototypes built to supplant the P5A, a 2-B+B-2, also wore the Loewy GG1 body), Little Joes, PRR's E44s, et cetera...


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Pennsy
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Re: the little known electrics
  PRR.B-1.jpg - 18735 Bytes
« Reply #4 on: Aug 27th, 2005, 8:28pm »
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Hi All,
 
Here is my second favorite electric, the B-1 electric switcher/ shifter.


http://Forums.Railfan.net/Images/Juice/PRR.B-1.jpg
Click Image to Resize

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Dyed in the wool PRR fan.
GP72ACe

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Re: the little known electrics
 
« Reply #5 on: Aug 27th, 2005, 8:51pm »
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Nice pic...but alas for the PC serpents    Still a winner for being a boxcab, though...  

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RARITAN_CLOCKER
Former Member
Re: the little known electrics
 
« Reply #6 on: Aug 27th, 2005, 8:56pm »
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    Ahhhh, the faithful, hard-working B-1!! Truly one of the PRR's unsung heroes!!

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RDG484
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Re: the little known electrics
 
« Reply #7 on: Aug 27th, 2005, 9:28pm »
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That's the first time I've ever seen a B-1 with the "Mating Worms."

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ClydeDET
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Re: the little known electrics
 
« Reply #8 on: Feb 17th, 2006, 3:16pm »
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The Texas Utilities E-25B is indeed a coal hauler. Line hauls lignite from an open pit operation to a power plant, seems like it is around 25 miles total, and was proposed to be (and may have been built so) automated operation. AFAIK, fully grade separated, all private right of way and mostly NOT accessible for pictures.
 
Black Mesa & Lake Powell is (or was) another electrified coal-hauler, open pit mine to power palnt, dedicated unit train services. E-50Cs, I think.
 
The big Virginian and N&W box-cab side-rod engines were about as impressive as it gets when you talk about hulking brutes.


« Last Edit: Nov 27th, 2009, 3:35pm by ClydeDET » Logged
Warren_Thompson
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Posts: 403
Re: the little known electrics
 
« Reply #9 on: Feb 17th, 2006, 8:02pm »
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ClydeDET:
 
Is the Texas Transportation Company electric freight line still in operation? It served the Pearl Brewery in San Antonio from an interchange with the Southern Pacific/Union Pacific, but said brewery went out of business several years ago (along with the old Lone Star Brewery, it's now another piece of Texas history down the drain).  
 
The TTC had a former Texas Electric home-built locomotive and a ex-City Lines of West Virginia steeplecab, both of which, I think, ought now qualify as "little known" -- if not rare -- "electrics."


« Last Edit: Feb 17th, 2006, 8:08pm by Warren_Thompson » Logged
RDG484
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Re: the little known electrics
 
« Reply #10 on: Feb 17th, 2006, 8:42pm »
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on Feb 17th, 2006, 3:16pm, ClydeDET wrote:       (Click here for original message)

Black MEsa & LAke Powell is (or was) another electrified coal-haul;er, open pit mine to power palnt, dedicated unt train services. E-50Cs, I think.

They were single-ended E-60C's, which were recently replaced with ex-NdeM double-ended E-60C's.


« Last Edit: Feb 17th, 2006, 8:42pm by RDG484 » Logged
RDG484
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Re: the little known electrics
 
« Reply #11 on: Feb 17th, 2006, 8:45pm »
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on Aug 21st, 2005, 9:00pm, green_elite_cab wrote:       (Click here for original message)
it seems the majority of this forum is all GG-1, with a helping of E-60 and some random toasters.  what about the other guys? there are loads of them that never quite made it, especialy modern ones.   like the GM-10, for example. i don't know if this was meant for the US or not, but EMD built this odd locomotive.  its sits on 3 b-b trucks... certainly strange

It was built as a prototype (along with the similar C-C GM-6C) for the Conrail electrified lines in the east.  The GM-10B has 3 of the same trucks as the AEM-7, and used Swedish electrical gear from ASEA.  The GM-6C looks identical, but has standard EMD Flexicoil trucks.


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Dutchrailnut
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Posts: 536
Re: the little known electrics
  AMT-996X.jpg - 95374 Bytes
« Reply #12 on: Feb 17th, 2006, 10:24pm »
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How about this one

http://Forums.Railfan.net/Images/Juice/AMT-996X.jpg
Click Image to Resize

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A true fan only takes pictures and only leaves footprints
Dutchrailnut
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Posts: 536
Re: the little known electrics
  amtrak-x995atsunnysideydnyc1-77ghl.jpg - 67564 Bytes
« Reply #13 on: Feb 17th, 2006, 10:25pm »
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Or how bout this one

http://Forums.Railfan.net/Images/Juice/amtrak-x995atsunnysideydnyc1-77ghl.jpg
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RDG484
Former Member
Re: the little known electrics
 
« Reply #14 on: Feb 18th, 2006, 12:36pm »
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The French 996 was a monomotor unit, with one huge motor over each truck.  She, and locomotives like it were used on the crack Budd-inspired "Le Mistral" in France.  The new headlight on the front center took away from its otherwise handsome look; IMO they should have left the headlights/markers alone.  The Nathan P-01235 horn (same as on an E-60) was a nice touch, however.
 
The 995, as most of us know, was the prototype for what later was the AEM-7, the workhorse of Amtrak under the wires.  Except for removal of the side buffer plates, Faiveley pans, and the new paint job, she looks pretty much as she did when running in Sweden.  I read in a magazine about a cab ride in this unit and the author said that after running through a 30 MPH speed restriction in Newark, DE, she accelerated up to 110 MPH in just a shade over a minute with a 5-car Amfleet train.


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Dutchrailnut
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Posts: 536
Re: the little known electrics
 
« Reply #15 on: Feb 18th, 2006, 5:22pm »
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Don't forget that both 995 and 996 while powering the test trains did NOT provide HEP as they were not equiped, this left the locomotive with a much higher HP rating without the HEP load.

« Last Edit: Feb 18th, 2006, 6:24pm by Dutchrailnut » Logged

A true fan only takes pictures and only leaves footprints
PW_bullet_train
Former Member
Re: the little known electrics
 
« Reply #16 on: Feb 19th, 2006, 2:01pm »
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on Feb 18th, 2006, 12:36pm, RDG484 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
The French 996 was a monomotor unit, with one huge motor over each truck.  She, and locomotives like it were used on the crack Budd-inspired "Le Mistral" in France.  The new headlight on the front center took away from its otherwise handsome look; IMO they should have left the headlights/markers alone.  The Nathan P-01235 horn (same as on an E-60) was a nice touch, however.
 
The 995, as most of us know, was the prototype for what later was the AEM-7, the workhorse of Amtrak under the wires.  Except for removal of the side buffer plates, Faiveley pans, and the new paint job, she looks pretty much as she did when running in Sweden.  I read in a magazine about a cab ride in this unit and the author said that after running through a 30 MPH speed restriction in Newark, DE, she accelerated up to 110 MPH in just a shade over a minute with a 5-car Amfleet train.

 
That's why they called  the 995, "The Mighty Mite."


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firstbelt
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Posts: 707
Re: the little known electrics
 
« Reply #17 on: Oct 1st, 2009, 12:31pm »
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CN ran some electrics in Montreal commuter operations.  In 1983, I caught Z-1a 6711 and 6710 boxcabs
http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=1778730
and Z-5a 6727 and 6725
http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=1778734
http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=1778735
 
The Ottawa Museum of Science & Tech has a large collection of CN rail photos in its archives, including Z5a #200 in 1950
http://www.imagescn.technomuses.ca/railways/index_choice.cfm?id=55&photoid=49013448


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Triplex
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Re: the little known electrics
 
« Reply #18 on: Oct 4th, 2009, 7:06pm »
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Love those CN boxcabs - the last of the "classic" electric operations. Were they the oldest locomotives in regular service in North America by the end? Since Iowa Traction's steeplecabs date to the 1920s, the only possible contenders would be... weren't there some Mexican industrial boxcabs in service later?
 
Going back to the first post (wow - four years ago), I believe the GM10B and GM6C were designed for Penn Central (though I don't think they were ready until Conrail), presumably to replace GG-1s.
 
But my favorite electric operations aren't American. In Brazil, there were Little Joes, 2-C-C-2s similar to New Haven designs, GE hood units similar to E44s (but both for 3000V DC, like almost all Brazilian electrics), old boxcabs and steeplecabs, Hitachi centercab rack electrics, and others. Most vanished in the 90s, but until then, it was very much "What if the classic US electrifications lasted longer?"
 
Most European electrics aren't very appealing, but I find Rheinbraun's interesting:
http://www.railfaneurope.net/pix/de/private/industry/Rheinbraun/pix.html
Seriously ugly, but look at the size!  
http://www.merte.de/BE/berichte/be163.htm
I must say I prefer the 1950s engines to the similar-looking modern ones.
 
There are also various interesting centercab electrics used mainly by mines, like these three-section locos:
http://eurospotter.fotopic.net/c591263.html
and the two-section standard design built by LEW in East Germany:
http://www.nordling.nu/schaefer/autumn2002/index.html


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Fan of late and early Conrail... also transition-era PRR, 70s Santa Fe, BN and SP, 70s-80s eastern CN, pre-merger-era UP, heavy electric operations in general, dieselized narrow gauge, modern EFVM and Brazilian railroads in general, transition-era DB and DR... why bother trying to list them all?
atlpete
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Re: the little known electrics
 
« Reply #19 on: Nov 27th, 2009, 1:52pm »
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http://www.davesrailpix.com/prr/htm/prr127.htm
 
I like them all, but have a particular liking for the P company's experimental rectifiers from the '50's  the GE E-2B's, (note in above link mu-ing with a P-5) which reportedly worked well enough to get GE the nod for the E44's
 
http://www.davesrailpix.com/prr/htm/bvpr149.htm
 
and the not as successful the BLW E-3B's and C's, a plumber's nightmare but it was all very neat looking stuff IMO, the sheer variety of the PRR electric roster was amazing.


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