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Topic Summary
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 5:40pm
   I had no idea that my "Head End Mania" thread was going to become so popular, with now well over 600 posts!! Thanks to the valuable contributions of others, so much in the way of historical images and info has been posted. Given the success of this thread, I thought I would start a similiar thread dedicated to dining cars. There is so much of great interest out there regarding diners and diner operations, that I thought a thread solely dedicated to them would be quite interesting. I look forward to those who have so generously contributed to my head-end thread getting on board here, celebrating the glory days of the American Dining Car! Bon Appetite and All Aboard!!  John
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 5:47pm
燣et's start our nostalgic culinary journey by rail with this 1960s view of E-L diner No. 770 at Marion. (I can just smell the savory aromas wafting from the galley!!) http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/pax/el-d770ae.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 5:50pm
  Here is a heavyweight DL&W Buffet-Lounge at Hoboken in 1939. "GONE WITH THE WIND" and "THE WIZARD OF OZ" premiered in that same year!   http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/pax/dlw-bl788blb.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 5:53pm
       Here's Erie diner No. 979 at Hoboken. Back in the 60s, such cars were still commonplace down at the Hoboken yards! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/pax/erie-di939abd.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 5:57pm
        Here is a pic of Erie diner No.942, circa 1940. It is easy to see why such cars were termed "HEAVYWEIGHTS"!  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/pax/erie-di942abd.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 5:59pm
    Here is E-L's No. 742.....a CLASSIC diner indeed!!  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/pax/el-di742ajh.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 6:03pm
   Here's the inside of an E-L menu from 1966......GREAT selection and GREAT prices!!  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/pax/dinner1.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 6:06pm
     Judging by this E-L breakfast menu, you certainly could start off the day with a good, hearty meal, while savoring the sights along the Route Of Miss Phoebe Snow! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/pax/break.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 6:09pm
 Back in the early years of the 20th century, diners like this handsome car were commonplace on the B&O, long known for outstanding meal service: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/bo/bo-d1006ahn.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 6:11pm
       This was the scene awaiting hungry B&O passengers aboard Diner-Lounge No. 2024, back in 1964. http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/bo/bo-l2024r.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 6:14pm
   B&O diner No. 1035 makes for an impressive sight at Pittsburgh in 1965: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/bo/bo-di1035cbr.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 6:16pm
    B&O No. 1083 is today preserved at the B&O Museum in Baltimore, happily cheating the torch!  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/bo/bo-d1083br.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 6:23pm
....pardon me, fellows....I'm feeling a mite hungry now....be back later.....   John
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 7:51pm
Lucius Beebe introduced us to the reason why railroad travelers had such luxurious accommodations in the beginning of dining by rail. As soon as cross country rail travel was possible, and overnight travel in particular, those individuals wealthy enough to make such a journey certainly weren't going to put up with uncomfortable sleeping arrangements and bad food! While the evolution of passenger car service in the late 1800s saw the development of coaches and sleeping cars, dining cars, too, began to come into use. The railroad's patrons who sat in the comfort of a Wagner or Pullman palace car would also want to dine in equal luxury. Yes, there were other dining accomodations available to the railroad passenger such as Harvey Houses and station-stop restaurants, but none...NONE...would ever surpass the height of culinary altitudes or equal the luxury appointements of the heavyweight-era dining cars. Let's take a look at some fine examples of this time in our history that is all gone but the photos and some recipies. First, here's an early 20th Century postcard from my collection showing the interior of a B&O dining car circa 1907. Note the style of the chairs and the small lamps on the tables.
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 8:02pm
The Richmond-Washington Line was the name of given to the Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac RR and the Alexandria and Fredericksburg Railway operated by the Richmond-Washington Company. Here is a postcard view of the parlor section of the parlor-diner car 'Powhatan'. From my collection.
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 8:06pm
The Reading left the old wood car days behind and entered the steel car era that included luxurious decor that would dare to compete with any railroad dining car anywhere. Again, note the chairs.
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 8:19pm
Nopt to be outdone in the least, The Milwaukee Road offered its transcontinental guests a touch of the finest available on any railroad in the land. Here is the interior of The Olympian providing exquisite meals between Chicago and Seattle. From my postcard collection. Note the stained glass panels above the windows.
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 8:22pm
This is another postcard view of a Reading dining car interior, circa 1905. Note the upholstered chairs instead of the traditional wood chairs in the earlier steel car view. Again, from my collection.
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 9:51pm
   This retired Santa Fe diner is seen at Houston, TX, back in 1978: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/atsf/atsf-d1488r.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 10:00pm
燞ere is Milwaukee Road's No. 170 back in 1978. Note boarded-up windows; obviously, the car had been already out-of-service for some time. Still, a very sleek car: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/milw/milw-d170ary.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 10:04pm
    L&N's "GALT HOUSE", a vintage heavyweight, is seen in 1979: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/ln/ln-d2726r.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 10:08pm
   Cocktails were once sipped aboard this smart-looking C&O tavern-lounge: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/co/co-t1980bgs.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 10:12pm
     Here's the cover for a 1966 E-L menu: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/pax/el-menu-a.jpg
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 10:14pm
Some of the recipies onboard the dining cars were made famous through the release of pstacrds like this one from the CB&Q:
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 10:15pm
   The most memorable of PHOEBE SNOW's cars were her two tavern-lounges. Here, both are seen passing at Binghamton, back in 1962: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/pax/el-tl-ds.jpg
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 10:15pm
And here's one from the Canadian National...
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 10:18pm
Hey, Russ; As expected, you have already outdone yourself, by posting these magnificent old postcard views of the dining cars of years back. You can certainly see that the dining car staff were all quite proud of their jobs, and that the railroads themselves believed in treating their passengers in a genteel, dignified manner!! 燗hhh, the good old days!! John
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 10:19pm
Interurban roads also had dining car service. Here is a card from my collection showing a dining car of the Chicago & Milwaukee Electric Railroad. Note the wicker seating.
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 10:23pm
      This beautiful streamlined PRR diner is seen at Pittsburgh: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/prr/prr-d1155r.jpg
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 10:24pm
Pullman-built ding cars were also found on the Cuban railroads. This car was one of the the 'Cuban Special' cars.
Posted by: Norm_Anderson Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 10:25pm
Russ, I'm going to have to give that recipe a try! 營've always been a sucker for Thousand Island dressing, and this looks terrific (of course, today, I'll be careful to use pasteurized eggs for the mayonnaise).
 
Your earlier quote from Lucius Beebe was very apropos. 營n one of his volumes, he makes the point that the railroads strove to convey the wealthy and influential from their five-star hotels on the East Coast to their five-star hotels on the West Coast, without them ever noticing an interruption or diminution of service. 燭op-tier Limiteds offered dining services that rivaled the formal dining rooms of the best hotels, and chefs and wait staff were hand-picked for excellence.
 
John, many thanks to you, too, for starting this thread. 燢eep 'em coming!
 
 
Regards,
 
Norm
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 10:28pm
     Here's another classic example of heavyweight diners; here is Canadian Pacific's "STIRLING" in a pic dating from 1952: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/cp/cp-ster-amf.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 10:29pm
Hi, Norm: You are most welcome! Only thing is......I find myself getting quite hungry......  John
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 10:33pm
This heavyweight DL&W buffet-lounge is seen at Hoboken in 1938: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/pax/dlw-bl783ajh.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 10:44pm
    How the mighty hath fallen!  Here's the former NH diner "WILLIAM BRADFORT" in a Conrail MOW train in July of 1980. This ol' gal deserves better!!  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nh/nh-diner.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 10:47pm
燗t Duluth, Minnesota, we see this sharp-looking BN diner: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/bn/bn-a26abp.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 10:52pm
      The D&H's classic paint scheme looks particularly nice on this diner at Binghamton: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/dh/dh-diner-as.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 10:55pm
     This retired D&RGW diner is still one beautiful and classic piece of passenger equipment: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/drgw/drgw-d804r.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 10:59pm
   Northern Pacific's trains were always magnificent in appearance. Here's Diner No. 463 in 1968: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/np/np-di463ajs.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 11:15pm
 This out-of-service Amtrak diner, seen at Newark in 1984, will no longer carry contented passengers savoring thier meals as they roll o'er the silvery rails: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/amtk/amtk-s8400akg.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 11:21pm
    "TIMELESS". "NOSTALGIC". "GENTEEL". These are the words that best describe this 1950s UP postcard, showing well-dressed passengers enjoying their meal. The proud dining car steward.....the well-groomed and well-dressed passengers......aaahh, such a scene will NEVER be seen again on the rails of America....but we can at least cherish the fond memories of such an elegant, innocent, long-ago time!  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/up/up-port-v.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 11:25pm
    Here is UP's diner "CITY OF LOS ANGELES" on a 1994 fantrip: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/up/up-cla-diner-r.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 11:33pm
    Here, way back in 1965, a smart-looking B&O diner basks in the sun at Pittsburgh: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/bo/bo-di1035bbr.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 7th, 2007, 11:55pm
Just in case you're feeling a wee bit hungry after going through all these dining car posts......... http://www.massrecipes.com/recipes/04/08/diningcarsteak259974.html
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 12:00am
Start your day the Santa Fe way.........whip up an order of French Toast A La Santa Fe!! UMMM-UMMM-GOOD!! http://www.massrecipes.com/recipes/05/01/frenchtoastsantaferailroa275751.html
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 12:08am
      Norfolk & Westen's passenger trains were always sharp-looking, and their diners certainly were no exception! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nw/nw-d494akg.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 12:14am
燞URRY! HURRY! HURRY! This ancient heavyweight diner is seen enjoying a second career serving up meals to clowns, acrobats, and, jugglers! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/ras/cwmx46dmh.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 12:19am
     Here's another view of the ancient circus diner pictured in the previous post. Looks as though the ol' big-top gal is all gussied up in a new, bright red coat!!  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/ras/cwmx48emh.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 12:25am
It is easy to imagine lovely Gibson Girls attired in their elegant traveling suits, and white-spatted gentlemen taking thier ease aboard this elegently attired B&M diner-lounge, the "THE MAINE". THIS, indeed, was CLASS, my friends!! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/bm/bm-dl.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 12:32am
     "FORMIDABLE". That's the word that I feel best describes this stately old Missouri Pacific diner: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/mp/mp10012asw.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 12:39am
       When my late brother and his new bride traveled aboard the SILVER METEOR on their honeymoon in 1963, they might have eaten aboard this classic SCL diner! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/scl/scl-d3222amh.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 12:42am
   This restored MKT heavyweight diner now resides at the Age Of Steam Museum in Dallas: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/asrm/trm-mkt-d438abr.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 12:46am
   This cover from a 1958 Alaska Railroad menu is truly a work of art!!  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/arr/arr-menu-cov.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 12:50am
燚ining info for CB&Q passengers, from wayyyy back in the 50s!! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/cbq/cbq-din-info-ar.gif
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 12:58am
燭hough this looks like a well-stocked rail museum, this indeed is a picture of a streamlined PRR diner (at left) sharing yard trackage with some other classic pieces of varnish at Pittsburgh! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/prr/prr-di1155abr.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 1:05am
       If you're thirsty while traveling on the PRR, there is no shortage of liquid refreshment available!  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/prr/prr-bev-mnu-r.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 1:08am
  This somewhat faded (but still proud) ex-PRR heavyweight diner resides at Traveltown, California: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/prr/prr-d4418ase.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 1:11am
   Back in 1929, when the Charleston, the Black Bottom, flappers, bathtub gin, speakeasies, and rumble-seated roadsters were in vogue, this handsome diner was the "new kid on the block" on the PRR:  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/prr/prr-d4427ahn.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 1:15am
    .....ahhhh, to go back in time and travel on the PRR.....and enjoy this for lunch!!  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/prr/prr-hot-tuk-br.jpg
Posted by: Pennsy Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 1:19am
Hi John,
 
I have been on board the heavyweight Diner in Travel Town, part of Griffith Park. They have parties for kids on board her.
 
How about some photos of Vista Dome Diners. The upper level, the Dome, of the Silver Lariat has been used for dining often. You can't believe the view from her Dome as you enjoy a fine meal on board her.
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 1:19am
     The PRR really OUTDID themselves with this circa-1960s menu cover!! A MASTERPIECE for ALL hungry railfans!!  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/prr/prr-63mnu-fc.gif
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 1:23am
 Here's PRR diner "HENRY HUDSON" going through a grade crossing.....a real STUNNER of a car!! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/prr/prr-dinhh-amf.jpg
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 3:46am
Not all dining cars were built by Pullman in the heavyweight days. This is a railroad-issued postcard from the Chicago & Eastern Illinois showing the interior of a 'cafe-lounge' car designed and built in their own shops.
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 4:04am
Here's a view of the same car, but from the lounge end.
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 7:42am
Flagship trains such as the Illinois Central's 'Panama Limited' were all-pullman trains. The Panama Limited set sail from Chicago for St. Louis and New Orleans. In this postcard view, we see well-dressed patrons enjoying the soup d'jour and partaking of the bottles of mineral water on the tables. Note the chairs in this view, too...They appear to be wood framed with stuffed leather or fabric cushion insets. The interior of this car is rich yet simple without an over-the-top decor.
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 7:47am
This is a classic view of the Panama Limited dining car galley in operation.  Some of the finest meals ever served originated from galleys such as this one.
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 9:15am
Not to be left out of the market for luring well-financed patrons, the Lehigh Valley ran 'The Black Diamond Express'. In this circa 1905 postcard view, we see not only the galley operations, but also a glimpse of the fine appointements of the dining car as well. Note the details in this galley view as compared to the one above.
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 9:56am
  Hey, Russ: WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  Those old postcards you've so generously shared with us are true masterpieces......each one a colorful and nostalgic window into an elegant and long-ago era in railroading!! Thanks again!!  John
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 10:01am
       Check out this beautiful UP diner.....UP's consists were always among the smartest on the rails.....small wonder!  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/up/up-d6203k.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 10:03am
營t's time for Happy Hour on the UP......cheers!! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/up/up-hs-drk-r.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 10:06am
on Jul 8th, 2007, 1:19am, Pennsy wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Hi John,
 
I have been on board the heavyweight Diner in Travel Town, part of Griffith Park. They have parties for kids on board her.
 
How about some photos of Vista Dome Diners. The upper level, the Dome, of the Silver Lariat has been used for dining often. You can't believe the view from her Dome as you enjoy a fine meal on board her.

     Hi, Pennsy: Bet you enjoyed your meal aboard that classic old diner! Now....I gotta try to "track down" the SILVER LARIAT..... John
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 10:10am
  Hi, Pennsy.....this one's for you!  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/cbq/cbq-silver-lariat.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 10:23am
燞ere's the "OLD PLANTATION" of the KCS. One HANDSOME piece of rolling stock! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/kcs/kcs-d57bm.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 10:26am
    Here's an interior view of the "OLD PLANTATION".  Simple yet stylish!  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/kcs/kcs-d58gm.jpg
Posted by: Pennsy Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 10:51am
Hi John,
 
You are getting close. In the view of the Silver Lariat, you can see the "booths" for the tables etc. As built, the Silver Lariat was a typical CZ dome car, all seats facing forward in the dome. When it was rebuilt, it turned up with dining room facilities in the dome. Far more interesting and comfortable.  
 
All of my HO gauge Vista Domes and Full Domes have scratch built interiors with HO gauge people. Based on photographs, and some wild imagination, they have the configurations of the real ones, and some additions that I felt were appropriate. In one Vista Dome Observation car, I have a wet bar at one end, tables and chairs throughout, and some nice red head waitresses replete with round trays for serving the drinks. When you have a gorgeous red head daughter, now a mother, you are particularly fond of red head waitresses, and tip accordingly.
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 12:05pm
 Hi, Pennsy: Man, those cars of yours with scratchbuilt interiors MUST be beautiful pieces of craftsmanship! Must be great to be so talented! I rode a dome only once, on an eastbound BROADWAY back in 1986, and, let me tell you, it was an expeience I will NEVER forget! Seeing the passing landscape and signals from an engineer's level was exciting enough, but, when a full moon was illuminating the scene...WHHOOAA!! Classic railroading at its best!! I was never a big fan of Amtrak, but,, I have to say, the dining car meals were delicious and enjoyable. Breakfast was my favorite!
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 12:08pm
燞ere's a streamlined (articulated!) Rock Island diner: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/ri/ri-d401n.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 12:12pm
燳ep, articulated diners were rare (and intriguing!) sights. Here is Rock Island's No. 404: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/ri/ri-d404n.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 12:18pm
    Here is Southern's No.951 on an excursion back in 1967; funny, this consist would not have looked at all out of place on many through trains operating at the time!  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/sout/sout-dinner.jpg
Posted by: Norm_Anderson Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 1:36pm
on Jul 8th, 2007, 10:01am, O. WINSTON LINK esq. wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Check out this beautiful UP diner.....UP's consists were always among the smartest on the rails.....small wonder! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/up/up-d6203k.jpg

 
 
Hey, John, thanks for posting this pic!  If my memories are correct, this is a rather interesting car, which saw service on the premier trains like the City of Los Angeles.  The Domeliners carried a Dome Coach for Chair Car patrons; the Dome Diner was ostensibly open to all, but was priced a bit steep for the budget-minded Chair Car crowd; and the Dome Lounge was reserved for Sleeping Car passengers only (except when needed as temporary overflow seating for passengers waiting to be seated in the Dome Diner).  The car in the photo was the Chair Car Diner, which was actually divided into three distinct areas-- the area behind the windows to the right of the small door held a lunch counter (seated passengers would have had their backs to the windows); the center of the car had a half-dozen booths for dining (served from the Lunch Counter); and the left-hand third of the car held lounge-type seating.  These cars were marketed in the brochures as the latest thing in smart long-distance Chair Car travel.
 
 
Regards,
 
Norm
Posted by: Norm_Anderson Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 1:43pm
on Jul 8th, 2007, 10:03am, O. WINSTON LINK esq. wrote:       (Click here for original message)
營t's time for Happy Hour on the UP......cheers!! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/up/up-hs-drk-r.jpg

 
 
I remember the Las Vegas Holiday Special, though I never rode it.  Trains 115 and 116 were a dedicated service between Los Angeles and Las Vegas, which operated during the day in both directions, carrying the hopeful to an evening's arrival on The Strip, and allowing the dejected to sleep it off on the long ride home.  The railroad did its part to ensure the happy throngs arrived well-lubricated for the all-night face-off against the one-armed bandits.  The trains were a rather diminutive consist (four to six cars behind a pair of E-8s, if I recall), but were just as spotless and well-maintained as the premier City fleet.
 
 
Regards,
 
Norm
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 2:24pm
  Hi, Norm: Thanks for that fascinating "Happy Hour" trivia! Yep, I guess the UP wanted to ensure that its patrons were already in a "party mood" before hitting the slots!!  John
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 2:30pm
        Though the NYS&W never had dining cars, this car shows us what "Susie-Q" diners might have looked like: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nysw/nysw-d507ajk.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 2:36pm
燭his handsome Frisco diner was originally built in 1948 for THE METEOR. Originally a diner/obs-lounge, it was rebuilt in the 1960s for use as a mid-train car by squaring off the obs end: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/slsf/slsf-d159abw.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 5:22pm
    Here's a pic of N&W Cafe-Lounge No. 1028 in 1967: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nw/nw-diner.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 5:26pm
     Here's a streamlined NYC diner at Sandusky, Ohio, in 1966: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nyc/nyc-diner-aml.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 5:28pm
  NYC's "BONNIE BROOK": http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nyc/nyc-dinbb-amm.jpg
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 8:35pm
The Union Pacific ran a varnish train from Chicago to Portland christened 'The Portland Rose'. 燦ote the rose motif in the decor of the train's dining car. The inscription on the reverse reads, "Dining cars on The Portland Rose provide the best in obtainable in food, service, and harmonious surrounding'.
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 8:47pm
The one train that stood head and shoulders above all others in this circa '20s era was, of course, The Overland Limited. The reverse inscription on this card speaks for the train itself:
 
'Overland Limited. The only extra fare train between Chicago and San Francisco.Runs daily via Chicago & North Western, Union Pacific, and Southern Pacific. Saving a business day enroute. THE TRAIN OF QUALITY.
 
Distinctive features of this new train
Barber
Ladies Maid (hairdressing and manicuring)
Valet (clothes pressing service)
Baths
Stenographer
Library and periodicals
Vapor heating
Electric lighting
Electric ventilation
Sanitary bubbling drinking fountain
Telephone
Telegraphic news service
Stock and market reports
Buffet club car service
Dining car service
Compartment and drawing room cars
Observation cars.'
 
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 8:49pm
This full-aisle-length view from the CB&Q touts not only luxury, but the absolutely latest in railroad passenger car construction.
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 10:36pm
      Hi, Russ; To see these magnificent vintage diner postcards that you have so generously shared with us here is truly both exciting and thought-provoking. HOW and WHEN did we EVER lose the elegance.....gentility.....and the pride.....that not only once characterized our railroads, but our society as well?? Well, whatever, THANKS AGAIN for your continued contributions to the thread!  John
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 10:49pm
燞ere's an interior view of L&N's "GALT HOUSE" : http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/ln/ln-d2726ar.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 10:56pm
    Anyone old enough (like yours truly!) to remember the old Automats will find this circa 1960 SP ad nostalgically familiar  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/sp/sp-buffet-info-br.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 11:09pm
燭he car on the left is a Bessemer & Lake Erie diner, seen at the B&O station at Pittsburgh in 1965: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/ble/ble-d200r.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 11:24pm
This picture of a streamlined Milwaukee Road diner shows the close resemblence that the road's paint had to the UP's: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/milw/milw-d167afm.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 11:29pm
   This out-of-service Amtrak diner looks as though it must have been a sharp-looking car in its prime. Any idea on its ancestry? Http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/amtk/amtk-d8069ags.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 11:40pm
   This old diner is seen sleeping in the sun at the Arizona Railroad Museum: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/steamtown/arr-diner-ava.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 11:43pm
   Here is former C&O Food-Bar-Coach No. 3000 at the B&O Museum at Baltimore: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/steamtown/co-c3000r.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 8th, 2007, 11:57pm
燭his old Amtrak diner still manages to show of her simple yet classic lines: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/amtk/amtk-di8093ags.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 12:14am
     UP's dome/diners (Nos 8005-8009) were built by ACF in 1955, for UP's "PORTLAND ROSE" service. Note the stairway to dome level at the rear of this photograph: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/bo/bo-diner.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 12:18am
    This streamlined diner is seen in the consist of the AMERICAN FREEDOM TRAIN at Kenvil, NJ, back in the 70s: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/aft/aft-d448akg.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 1:15am
   ......I think it's time for a little midnight snack....... 'night, all!! See ya in the morning!  John
Posted by: Norm_Anderson Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 4:03am
on Jul 8th, 2007, 11:29pm, O. WINSTON LINK esq. wrote:       (Click here for original message)
燭his out-of-service Amtrak diner looks as though it must have been a sharp-looking car in its prime. Any idea on its ancestry? Http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/amtk/amtk-d8069ags.jpg

 
 
Hi, John,
 
This is listed as an ex-Great Northern car (named Lake Union) and built by ACF.  I discovered this info on Jerry LaBoda's terrific website, http://www.trainweb.org/passengercars  If you've never visited, fasten your seatbelt and prepare to be mesmerized.
 
Regards,
 
Norm
Posted by: Norm_Anderson Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 4:12am
on Jul 9th, 2007, 12:14am, O. WINSTON LINK esq. wrote:       (Click here for original message)
燯P's dome/diners (Nos 8005-8009) were built by ACF in 1955, for UP's "PORTLAND ROSE" service. Note the stairway to dome level at the rear of this photograph: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/bo/bo-diner.jpg

 
Hi again, John,
 
UP's Dome Diners were, in my opinion, the zenith of dining-car design. 營 had the privilege of having dinner in one back in 1963, when I was 11 and traveling with my folks, and these cars were every bit as elegant and as enthralling as you would imagine. 燭he black-and-white photo does not really do justice to the interior, which was done up in soft, restful pastels (with pink tablecloths, no less!). 燭wo trains had 'em: the City of Los Angeles and the City of Portland. 燭he Portland Rose had apparently once been the Chicago - Portland UP flagship, but by 1955 when the Dome Diners were introduced, this train had become the secondary service, and had also been changed to a Kansas City - Portland service. 燢nowing UP, it was still an excellent train, but the City fleet got the Domes.
 
 
Regards,
 
Norm
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 5:26am
    Hi, Norm: The info on that ex-Amtrak diner was greatly appreciated, as was that on the UP cars! It's great finding out stuff you had been only guessing about!   Thanks again!  John
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 5:36am
       C&O Diner No. 1953's is seen here at San Antonio, Texas: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/co/co-d1953ags.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 5:39am
     Also seen at San Antonio, is C&O Tavern-Lounge No.1980: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/co/co-t1980ags.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 5:42am
      Here's a nice 2006 shot of UP diner No. 302 basking in the sun: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/up/up-di302aij.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 5:45am
燞ere's a "CITY" diner, as seen at Fort Worth, back in 1994: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/up/up-cla-ags.jpg
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 9:41am
This is a heavyweight dining car interior view from the Frisco and was issued by the railroad circa '30s. The reverse inscription reads, 'Frisco dining cars reflect an atmosphere of refinement and elegance - food is the finest the markets afford and the prices are reasonable. All cars air-conditioned.' Note that this is the first time that affordability of meals is mentioned. This card was issued during The Depression and the general traveling public was willing to bypass expensive dining car meals in order to save money.
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 9:44am
Here is another view of a Frisco dining car interior from the same period. 'Frisco Famous Food. Served in that home like style.'
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 9:55am
The Missouri Pacific advertised itself as 'A Service Institution' and the interior of this lounge-dining car proves it! Running on MoPac's 'Sunshine Special', this air-conditioned car was 'de luxe' in every way.
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 10:07am
Here is another Frisco card advertising low-cast meals in order to attract traveling families during the '30s. Here are a happy Mom 'n Dad 'n Junior 'n Sis enjoying affordable tray meals available in chair cars and coaches.
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 10:15am
Hi, Russ: As usual, you've outdone yourself yet again! Those beautiful mini-masterpieces of yours are beyond priceless. Each and every one is a miniature time machine, enabling us all to travel back to the Golden Era of the American Passenger Train. Bravo and Bon Appetite, my friend!!
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 12:41pm
    Here's another beautiful UP diner......note non-UP car at left: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/up/up-cola-k.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 12:47pm
Hurry and write to PRR's Dining Car Service Department and order your set today!! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/prr/prr-ands-ar.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 3:04pm
    Next time you are traveling via the PRR, why not try one of these delicious sandwiches?  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/prr/prr-menu-s-r.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 3:06pm
.....and.....after enjoying a tasty PRR-style sandwich, why not relax and watch the scenery go by through the windows of lounge car "PAUL REVERE"? http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/prr/prr-paul-revere-o.jpg
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 4:57pm
Here's another Frisco card...a 'snack car' showing smartly dressed travelers taking a coffee break at the counter.
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 4:59pm
...and here is the reverse side of the card. Again, we see an emphasis on 'meals with budget appeal'.
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 5:03pm
The competition for passengers on the Twin Cities and Chicago route was fierce. The Milwaukee Road ran its famous 'Hiawata' and the Chicago North Western ran the equally famous '400'. This is a view of the dining car on the steam era train.
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 5:04pm
...and this is the reverse side of that card.
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 5:07pm
By comparison, this is a postcard from the diesel era C&NW's new  '400' series showing the interior of its streamlined dining car. This car is postmarked 1941. Note the interior differences between the heavyweight and streamlined versions.
Posted by: Pennsy Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 6:05pm
Hi Russ,
 
Nice postcards. Did you notice what I noticed ? On the North Western Diner you have seating for both sides of four people. Normally you have seating for four on only one side of the car, and for two on the opposite side. That must be a wider diner, or the aisle between the tables is much smaller.
Posted by: Norm_Anderson Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 7:03pm
That's an excellent point, Alan!  And, Russ, I believe that's the first photo I've ever seen of 2-and-1 seating in a heavyweight Diner.  Lightweights came in 48-seat (12 tables for four) and 36-seat (six tables for four and six tables for two) versions.  I suspect, Alan, that the 48-seat Diners had narrower aisles and slightly shorter tables.
 
 
Regards,
 
Norm
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 10:16pm
    And now, for your reading pleasure....."Dining Car Experiences".....  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/pax/din-exp.html
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 10:29pm
燭he photo link caption for this handsome AT&SF car describes this car as "lunch" Whatever, it's still a handsome-looking car! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/atsf/atsf-lu1553abr.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 10:38pm
 Here's another AT&SF  "oddity"; a heavyweight "Snack Bar" car: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/atsf/atsf-p3365.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 10:43pm
Here's another AT&SF "Snack Bar" heavyweight; this car appears to have been modernized, at least in comparison to the previous car!! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/atsf/atsf-p3366.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 10:51pm
燙heck out this AT&SF "Lunch Counter/Diner-Dorm": http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/atsf/atsf-p1570.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 10:57pm
      Here's a AT&SF sugar packet.....a SWEET addition to your trip!! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/atsf/atsf-sugar-ar.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 11:06pm
    After the D&RGW ceased operating regular passenger trains, it operated ski trains. Here is the diner "UTAH" in a ski train consist: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/drgw/drgw-ski-fr.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 11:15pm
燦P's Diner No.494 certainly made for a splendid sight in this consist! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/np/np-di494ajs.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 11:26pm
Here's a PRR cocktail list, circa 1960s. Even though I'm a die-hard teetoatler, I wouldn't mind having that PRR glass..... http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/prr/prr-cocktail-r.gif
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 9th, 2007, 11:30pm
     .....more PRR "goodies" from long ago : http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/prr/prr-ds-ar.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 12:36am
   An elegant Victorian house in Binghamton makes for an interesting backdrop for this classic D&H diner: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/dh/dh-diner-bs.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 12:39am
   Here's another stylish D&H car, the lounge "ADIRONDACK LODGE": http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/dh/dh-d42d.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 12:44am
SP's "OVERLAND"........VERY smart-looking diner! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/sp/sp-overlnd-aeg.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 12:46am
If the SP merged with the NYC, perhaps their passenger cars would have looked like this : http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/sp/sp-overlnd-beg.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 12:53am
Fine dining was to be yours aboard the Zephyr!! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/cbq/cbq-zephyr-r.gif
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 12:58am
     Straight from the Gay 90s comes this elegant interior view of NYC&HR RR's Diner No.415: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nyc/nych-d415ajg.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 1:01am
    Skilled craftsmen and carbuilders worked together to build this elegant wooden NYC buffet car: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/nyc/nych-bu447ajg.jpg
Posted by: jmlaboda Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 1:13am
>SP's "OVERLAND"........VERY smart-looking diner!
 
Except that the car is not a diner.  It is a lounge car.
 
An interesting feature that should be mentioned about this car... the two images linked to are the two sides of this one car, one painted in Daylight paint, the other in Lark paint... done by the car's owner to honor both Espee services.
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 1:25am
on Jul 10th, 2007, 1:13am, jmlaboda wrote:       (Click here for original message)
>SP's "OVERLAND"........VERY smart-looking diner!
 
Except that the car is not a diner. 營t is a lounge car.
 
An interesting feature that should be mentioned about this car... the two images linked to are the two sides of this one car, one painted in Daylight paint, the other in Lark paint... done by the car's owner to honor both Espee services.

  Hi, Jerry: Thanks! Once again, you provided me with knowledge that I did not have previously! I had no idea that what I percieved as two DIFFERENT cars were actually the SAME car!! 燭hanks again! 燡ohn
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 1:37am
     An "Amfleet" cafe car is seen in this contemporary view: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/amtk/amtk-loug-ar.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 1:39am
    Here's the breakfast (my FAVORITE meal, I might add!) menu from Amtrak's EMPIRE BUILDER: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/amtk/amtk-eb-break.gif
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 1:44am
      Interior view of Amtrak Diner on the LAKE SHORE LIMITED: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/amtk/amtk-d8528arl.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 1:47am
   This once-proud Amtrak diner seems to have fallen upon hard times: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/amtk/amtk-d8752amh.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 11:08am
    This page from a 1963 PRR menu is a true time warp! Check out the New York eateries the PRR suggests!  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/prr/prr-63mnu-ri.gif
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 12:03pm
      Here's a PRR "snack" menu, circa 1960s. NICE little selection!!  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/prr/prr-snack-br.gif
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 12:07pm
     ATTENTION RAILFANS: If you should encounter a time warp and find yourself riding the PRR circa 1960, make sure to ask for the "souvenier children's menu" when preparing to dine in the diner......  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/prr/prr-ds-br.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 12:12pm
    Here is DL&W Buffet-Lounge No.788 At Hoboken in 1938. Note blanked-off vestibule door at left: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/pax/dlw-bl788alb.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 1:44pm
      An E-L menu cover from the 60s, featuring Miss Phoebe's stylish Tavern-Lounge: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/pax/menu-2.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 1:48pm
Binghamton, NY, 1963: A classic shot of Phoebe's TL No. 790. Truly, a timeless image from the classic era of American passenger trains: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/pax/el-tl790bt.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 1:52pm
燱hat type of china did DL&W patrons dine on? Click on the link to find out........HOWEVER.....what happened to the original Lackawanna china after the merger with the Erie in 1960 is NOT a pleasant scenario to visualize : http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/pax/dlw-china.html
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 10:06pm
  Here's the front and rear cover of a 1960s E-L menu....note the prices (especially the soft drinks)!! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/pax/dinner2.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 10:11pm
Let it never be said that the E-L did not serve up tasty lunches to its diner patrons! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/pax/lunch1.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 10:24pm
營t's obvious that this NdeM (Mexico) diner has AMPLE ventilation! OLE!! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/ndem/ndem-c3683v.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 10:29pm
         A sleek-looking BN lounge poses for the photographer on a bright sunny day over 20 years ago: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/bn/bn-l10abp.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 10:38pm
      This Tioga Central lounge is a classic! Really a beautiful car! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/misc-t/tcr500agd.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 10:48pm
    This KCS heavweight coach-diner certainly looks to be one SOLID vehicle! http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/kcs/kcs-ld53bm.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 10:50pm
    "MAGNIFICENT". That's the word I feel best describes this streamlined KCS diner: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/kcs/kcs-d58am.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 10:55pm
     Here's another shot of KCS coach-lounge No. 53, after bieng modernized. Cars like this really made for one good-looking train!  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/kcs/kcs-ld53em.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 11:48pm
  Here's a beautiful color shot of KCS "OLD PLANTATION" (built by ACF in 1949): http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/kcs/kcs-d57am.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 10th, 2007, 11:57pm
    Here's a view of the stylish interior of the "OLD PLANTATION": http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/kcs/kcs-d58fm.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 11th, 2007, 12:00am
     Here's a moody shot of a streamlined KCS diner during a station stop on a long-ago rainy day: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/kcs/kcs-ld52bm.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 11th, 2007, 12:10am
There are some mighty tasty morsels to choose from in this vintage PRR a la carte menu: http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/prr/prr-alacarte-br.gif
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 11th, 2007, 12:15am
      As is obvious from this long-ago menu, the PRR KNEW how to treat its dining car customers right!!  http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/prr/prr-ands-br.jpg
Posted by: jmlaboda Posted on: Jul 11th, 2007, 9:12am
You mentioned the Tioga Central lounge car but lets not forget about the dining car...
 
http://abpr.railfan.net/abprphoto.cgi?november00/11-25-00/TC_02942_Heavyweight_Diner.jpg
Posted by: O. WINSTON LINK esq. Posted on: Jul 11th, 2007, 9:28am
 Thanks, Jerry! I gotta agree with you! NICE-looking car as well!!  John
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 11th, 2007, 10:15am
The Depression of the 1930s didn't stop all passenger rail travel, but it did alter the way that railroads provided long distance services. While it is true that wealthier travelers were still riding the Broadway Limited and the 20th Century Limited, the larger traveling public was being conservative in its spending when it came to train travel and especially when it came to spending money in a dining car. The following link is to an excellent article that discusses how 'The Challenger' was started in 1935. Operating between Los Angeles and Chicago by the UP and the C&NW. The Challenger was a successful attempt to offer a lesser expensive 'limited' with all of the appointments of a more expensive train.  
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Challenger_%28passenger_train%29
 
This first postcard from the '30s shows a pair of travelers enjoying an affordable meal on the train.
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 11th, 2007, 10:17am
This is another view of a 'Challenger' streamlined dining car.
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 11th, 2007, 10:25am
This color card gives us a better view of the dining car interior. Note the inset 'From the Dinner Menu'. The reverse inscription reads, 'Delicious, substantial, low cost meals are a feature on the North Western-Union Pacific's Challenger. This famous comfort-economy train for coach Tourist Sleeping Car passengers operates daily between Chicago and the Pacific Coast.'
Posted by: Pennsy Posted on: Jul 11th, 2007, 10:26am
Hi Russ,
 
Once again, a streamliner with four at a table seating on both sides. Just how common was that ?  
 
How about booth type seating as in a Vista Dome ?
 
Of equal interest is the photo of the two ladies at a table for two. Don't you find it fascinating that those dress styles are actually coming back ? You have to look at the hairdo's, makeup, and hats to tell that this is a OLD photograph. Anyone familiar with the Makeup Man's art will just love that shot.
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 11th, 2007, 11:27am
Here's a close-up of a 'delicious, substantial' meal aboard the Challenger. Ig you compare this car view to the inset in the postcard above, you'll notice that it's the same.
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 11th, 2007, 11:54am
This postcard view is of a Pere Marquette's dining car interior. These beautifully styled cars were the first post-WW2 dining cars to feature a break with the usual table and seating arrangements. The reverse inscription reads,  'The PERE MARQUETTES', operating between Detroit, Lansing, and Grand Rapids, are the first postwar streamliners to present novel dining cars with tables set diagonally into alcoves along the wall. Waitresses and elimination of tipping are among other distinctive Pere Marquette dining features.'
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 11th, 2007, 12:01pm
As we move further into the post-war era, we see more experimentation with seating arrangements. The Kansas City Southern's 'New Southern Belle' dining car shown in this card is a product of ACF. The reverse inscription reads, 'Travel Perfection between Kansas City and Five Gulf Ports - New Orleans, Baton Rouge and Lake Charles, La.; Port Arthur and Beaumont, Tex.' Note the color quality and tone of the card as compared to the one above. The coloration makes the people look 'undead'!
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 11th, 2007, 1:21pm
In the streamlined era, the Santa Fe's modern scheme is solidly reflected in this dining car interior on the Super Chief'.
Posted by: Norm_Anderson Posted on: Jul 11th, 2007, 9:05pm
Russ, thanks so much for posting this pic of Budd Diner Cochiti from the original, one-of-a-kind 1937 Super Chief. 燭he Flexwood paneling (here billed as "bubinga wood") was one of a dozen exotic woods used to grace the interior of this hand-decorated streamliner. 燚iner Cochiti was also, I believe, where the famous "Mimbreno" china pattern was first introduced to the world. 燭his postcard view (which you have also graciously posted on the "Postcards" forum) is the only color shot of Cochiti's interior that I have ever seen.
 
Thanks again,
 
Norm
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 13th, 2007, 10:24am
My pleasure, Norm...
 
Here is another card from that series showing the lounge car interior.
Posted by: hudsonelectric Posted on: Jul 13th, 2007, 12:30pm
This is a note given to passengers aboard Canadian National trains advertising dining car services. The reverse side is in French. From my collection.
Posted by: Nighttrain Posted on: Jul 13th, 2007, 5:59pm
Russ, thank you for sharing from your collection of post cards.  Truly historical and informative....Bob
Posted by: Nighttrain Posted on: Jul 13th, 2007, 6:00pm
Interesting piece of history is the dining car service pins worn by employees on the New Haven Railroad.
 
http://www.nhrhta.org/htdocs/images0999.htm
Posted by: Nighttrain Posted on: Jul 13th, 2007, 6:02pm
Interior view of 83 ton Southern Railway dining car number 3164, as restored by members of Southern Appalachia Railway Museum www.techscribes.com Photo credit: SARM
 

Posted by: Nighttrain Posted on: Jul 13th, 2007, 6:04pm
For those like myself who might ask.  How much china inventory do you imagine existed on railroads at one given time? The numbers must have been staggering.  
 
For example: According to a mid-1960's letter from the Erie Lackawanna (EL) dining car department: "On a typical run from Hoboken to Chicago an EL diner would be stocked with 400 pieces of china, 475 pieces of silver, 250 pieces of glassware, 600 napkins, 120 tables cloths plus enough waiters' uniforms, cooks' coats, hats and aprons to supply each man with two a day". Information credited to Tim Stuy
Posted by: Pennsy Posted on: Jul 13th, 2007, 6:09pm
Hi,
 
Well that certainly explains the use of disposable china and utensils etc. etc. these days.
Posted by: Nighttrain Posted on: Jul 14th, 2007, 8:16am
Yum匶um.  California Zephyr Dining Menu from 1961.  Joe Korner Collection  
 

Posted by: Nighttrain Posted on: Jul 14th, 2007, 8:18am
A highly informative website illustrating and discussing the staffing of dining car service on the Union Pacific.  Here is an excellent primer on learning about the history of dining car service in America.  http://mcscom.com/asra/3669.htm  
Posted by: Nighttrain Posted on: Jul 14th, 2007, 9:39am
Railroads in the United States had a preference of owning and operating their own dining cars.  Each railroad in an attempt to display an image of traveling excellence demanded impeccable service and superior prepared foods.  For many passengers the dining car service was the reason they rode a particular railroad and train.  While this was an excellent concept for public relations, it came at an enormous expense.
 
Dining cars were expensive to build.  Each required custom-built kitchen equipment and an extensive inventory of china and silverware.  In addition, the cars were costly to staff.  A dining car required a staff of upwards of ten cooks, waiters, and stewards who did not work continuously, the way other train employees did.  And since a dining car had only a limited number of seats the revenue earned never equaled the expense. For these reasons dining cars ran only on name trains and well-traveled routes having a high-density of passengers.    
 
Unfortunately, the high-density of passengers created its own public relations nightmare when it came to dining service.  The restricted number of seats available meant passengers had to reserve their seat by placing their name on a waiting list with the dining steward.  This meant some passengers would not eat at their preferred meal time.  This created a grouchy, complaining passenger and more likely one who regularly frequented the train.  And then there were the passengers who felt intimidated by the dining car and would go hungry rather than embarrass themselves by picking up the wrong folk or would be frightened by reading a menu without a seeing the price of the meal.  
 
If you ask anyone who wrote the steel rail carpet on a regular basis in the 1930抯 40抯 50抯 and even into the early 1960抯, they will remember the service by the name of the railroad and that 揹inner in the diner was a pleasure and enjoyable experience with ever changing scenery outside the window, while being treated like royalty.  
 
Although the following photo is a publicity shot from the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad, people actually did dress this way for dinner.  And there was no such thing as a table for one.  
 
 

 
Posted by: Pennsy Posted on: Jul 14th, 2007, 10:13am
Hi,
 
Now you brought back some memories. I now remember why we would  have dinner at Penn Station at the Savarins before we boarded the train to DC. Even though money was available, for those times, we could not justify that expense when a much better meal could be had at a concession inside Pennsylvania Station, NYC. And the food was better and much more reasonable.
Posted by: Norm_Anderson Posted on: Jul 14th, 2007, 7:04pm
An interesting variation on Dining Car operations was the Santa Fe's partnership with The Fred Harvey Company. 燭he railroad purchased and maintained the Dining Cars themselves, while Fred Harvey handled food purchasing, preparation, and staffing (and pocketed the revenues). 燬anta Fe benefitted from Fred Harvey's well-earned reputation for culinary excellence, and Fred Harvey benefitted from a fleet of rent-free establishments frequented by a well-heeled and captive audience. 營t was a true symbiotic relationship that worked to the benefit of both parties.
 
 
Regards,
 
Norm
Posted by: Nighttrain Posted on: Jul 14th, 2007, 8:32pm
Your table awaits you.
 

 
Interior view of ACF built Denver and Rio Grande Castle Peak Dining Car.  Photo Credit: Denver Public Library
Posted by: Nighttrain Posted on: Jul 14th, 2007, 8:33pm
In 1952, Pullman published 揑nstructions to Porters, Attendants, and Bus Boys  It makes for some interesting reading: http://www.scsra.org/library/rulebook.html
Posted by: Nighttrain Posted on: Jul 15th, 2007, 8:24pm
揂T&SF Fred Harvey dinner.  Fred Harvey was an English immigrant who in 1870 met Charlie Morse, president of then fledging Atchison Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad.  They forged a business relationship with Fred Harvey building restaurants to accommodate Santa Fe passengers and in later years the company providing meals on diners such as this.  
   
http://www.trainweb.org/jssand/Captive/61FredHarvey.jpg
 
Posted by: Nighttrain Posted on: Jul 15th, 2007, 8:25pm
AT&SF Heavyweight Dining Car Photo Credit: Denver Public Library
 

 
Posted by: George B. Pullman Posted on: Aug 1st, 2007, 12:58pm
on Jul 15th, 2007, 8:24pm, Nighttrain wrote:       (Click here for original message)
揂T&SF Fred Harvey dinner. 燜red Harvey was an English immigrant who in 1870 met Charlie Morse, president of then fledging Atchison Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. 燭hey forged a business relationship with Fred Harvey building restaurants to accommodate Santa Fe passengers and in later years the company providing meals on diners such as this.  
 
http://www.trainweb.org/jssand/Captive/61FredHarvey.jpg
 

Fred Harvey also built a fine hotel and restaurant over in the Grand Canyon in 1905 that still operates. 燭he Grand Canyon Railroad has taken over the ops but you may sometimes see those old diner cars coming down the pike from Williams to the Grand Canyon on occasion.
Posted by: Nighttrain Posted on: Aug 1st, 2007, 8:17pm
Nothing could be finer than dinner in the diner.  Budd built Southern Pacific dining car.
 
http://www.trainpage.com/tSp/images/spDinerOrLoungeOnTr2Depo.jpg
 
 
Posted by: Nighttrain Posted on: Aug 1st, 2007, 8:18pm
Southern Pacific triple-unit articulated diner in SP抯 揇aylight paint scheme.  SP抯 business car 揋audalope is at the rear.
 
http://www.trainpage.com/tSp/images/SP-PsgrStoredH_tonTX12-2231.jpg
 
Posted by: ClydeDET Posted on: Oct 5th, 2007, 10:57pm
The PRR train I rode east of Chicago on the way to Aberdeen in 1966 had a twin-unit articulated diner. Nice car, but it didn't feed as well (or have the same sort of staff attitude) that the Fred Harvey service on the Texas Chief from Dallas to Chicago provided.
 
And the comparison of Fred Harvey for breakfast and the Pennsy auto-mat car (train split at Harrisburg, one section including the diner to NYC, the other with the auto-mat to Washington via Baltimore) doesn't bear recall. Ugh - that was an abomination (the auto-mat car, not Fred Harvey service on the Santa Fe)
Posted by: Nighttrain Posted on: Oct 7th, 2007, 10:31am
In November 1947, Raymond Loewy, at the request of the PRR, began studying pre-fab meals on the rails.  The intent and final outcome was cutting dining car costs.  It made the PRR accountants happy, but seldom satisfied the rail traveler.  November of 1947 was also same month that the PRR completed the removal of the train shed at Pittsburgh.  The following photo is from a 1953 PRR publicity shot showing one of the Loewy designs for low cost dining service.
 

Posted by: Ronal_Fadillah_IRF Posted on: Apr 12th, 2018, 10:07am
on Jul 7th, 2007, 6:03pm, O. WINSTON LINK esq. wrote:       (Click here for original message)
   Here's the inside of an E-L menu from 1966......GREAT selection and GREAT prices!! 02http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/pax/dinner1.jpg

 
 
Weew, there's a turkey, but unfortunely„… I cann't try it, because My religion're Moeslem, because in My religion all slashed meat outside Moeslem slasher people that's stated doesn't Halal status
Posted by: Ronal_Fadillah_IRF Posted on: Apr 14th, 2018, 9:21am
#Promotion
 
Indonesia dinning coach or car sheets picture your can see in My threads entitled "Menus of Indonesia dinning car"