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FAIRBANKS MORSE TRAIN MASTER H-24-66
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   Author  Topic: FAIRBANKS MORSE TRAIN MASTER H-24-66  (Read 412 times)
RRG2

Posts: 388
FAIRBANKS MORSE TRAIN MASTER H-24-66
 
« on: May 9th, 2011, 3:54pm »
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Any first hand or second hand accounts having to do with operating these locomotives would be welcome.

« Last Edit: May 9th, 2011, 3:54pm by RRG2 » Logged

EACH DAY IS A GIFT....NOT A GIVEN RIGHT
WVa_Jon
Chaser
Posts: 65
Re: FAIRBANKS MORSE TRAIN MASTER H-24-66
 
« Reply #1 on: Aug 27th, 2015, 10:59pm »
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Would a third-hand account do?
 
Way back around 1979-80, I was able to talk with a Conrail crew working the former NYC line east of Charleston, WV. Given that NYC/PC/CR had a lot bigger assortment of power than the dog-biscuit-ugly Geeps on the B&O, closer to my home at the time, I asked the crew if they had had any such experience with any FM's. The engineer laughed and said they could always tell when any kind of FM, especially the Train Masters, were coming--he said it sounded like a fighter plane from WW2 was flying in the area!
 
I've never heard an FM locomotive but there _may_ have been some FM powered tugs on the Ohio River. We used to live within sight of the river and I can't begin to count the times I thought a train was coming--when it was a barge. Sigh.


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HwyHaulier
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Posts: 3432
Re: FAIRBANKS MORSE TRAIN MASTER H-24-66
 
« Reply #2 on: Aug 28th, 2015, 11:33am »
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WVaJon - RRG2 - Lodge Members -
 
AH! The sounds  of the mighty F - M Power!
 
Trivia Notes. Some of the long ago films about Subs during WW2. There is one, bit part in it by Don Rickles, about duty in the Pacific.  
These were the "long haul" Subs. Many had F-M Power Plants. Sound track for the film quite accurate...
 
Real Life note? When your writer lived in the Golden State, ages back, the ESPEE Main ran close to back of my apartment residence.  
The F-M Power by that time held down the San Francisco - San Jose Commutes. So, they passed thru all the time...
 
...........................Vern.....................


« Last Edit: Aug 28th, 2015, 12:29pm by HwyHaulier » Logged

Ticket Agent serving...Pacific Stage Lines...Washington State System...Mt. Hood Stages...Pickwick Stages...Transcontinental & Western Air Lines.... Admitted Gold Bug..... Observant Orthodox Mossback..... H.M.R.A.O. Curmudgeons......
ClydeDET
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Posts: 4780
Re: FAIRBANKS MORSE TRAIN MASTER H-24-66
 
« Reply #3 on: Aug 28th, 2015, 6:36pm »
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McCall's EARLY DIESEL DAYS ON THE SANTA FE has some things to say about F-M power on the Santa Fe, but no Trainmasters. Decidedly minority power on the Iron Cross, they weren't liked that much.

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WVa_Jon
Chaser
Posts: 65
Re: FAIRBANKS MORSE TRAIN MASTER H-24-66
 
« Reply #4 on: Sep 8th, 2015, 2:23am »
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You're right about the sound of FM power. I've run across several "You Tube" clips of FM's running on tourist lines. One of my favorites has a former Army H-12-44 pulling an excursion train back around 2002 on the Blue Grass Railroad Museum (sp??). Sadly, something (the generator?) caught fire and the train backed in using the engine's battery power. I doubt it's been fired up since. I stand by my recollections of Ohio River tugs, though!
 
There were a couple of WW2 movies about subs that come to mind. One was "Run Silent, Run Deep"--maybe--where Clark Gable was the captain and Burt Lancaster took over after Gable's character is killed in action. Another one was the film where Cary Grant was the skipper. I don't recall the title, but maybe it was "Up Periscope". I don't know which one Don Rickles was in, but Alan Hale was in one, as an ensign who got promoted to JG.
 
I hope they have some of these for Veteran's Day! TCM and maybe some other channels usually had a good selection of films to honor veterans. Interestingly, one of my church's deacons used to be a boiler tech--on a tin can, no sardine can!--and was able to use his Navy skills for a civilian career.


« Last Edit: Sep 8th, 2015, 2:26am by WVa_Jon » Logged
McAdoo WG
Former Member
Re: FAIRBANKS MORSE TRAIN MASTER H-24-66
 
« Reply #5 on: Sep 8th, 2015, 12:57pm »
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Fellows:
 
The FM's I grew up with back in the 60's were those of the CNJ (the CNJ's TRAINMASTERS, incidently, had the highest gearing of any built)
 
The CNJ also operated "Baby" FM's, and I recall these also bieng used in suburban consists, pre-ALDENE (1967)
 
Watching a big, beefy FM blast through a local Bayonne station with a fully-loaded string of a dozen or so clattering, swaying heavyweights was indeed an experience to remember.......it was as though the FM was but a kid tugging at the string of a toy balloon......such duties were but child's play indeed for these harmonic hulksters!
 
"Mc WG"
 
In an interesting sidenote, the CNJ's diesel tugs were also FM powered (Aaaaahhhh, what sweet music!)......


« Last Edit: Sep 8th, 2015, 6:39pm by CLASSB » Logged
WVa_Jon
Chaser
Posts: 65
Re: FAIRBANKS MORSE TRAIN MASTER H-24-66
 
« Reply #6 on: Sep 8th, 2015, 4:01pm »
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Just curious, I've heard a lot about gearing but what exactly does it mean? For example, I once read about F-units being geared at "63:15" or something along those lines, and some ex-passenger units regeared for freight service. Any comments would be enlightening!
 
Second, if the "Jersey Boys" FM's were anything like the Reading's (just think of those colorful TM's in Don Ball's book, "America's Colorful Railroads"), I have to agree. That WOULD have been an impressive event, indeed!


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Henry
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Posts: 6081
Re: FAIRBANKS MORSE TRAIN MASTER H-24-66
 
« Reply #7 on: Sep 8th, 2015, 4:41pm »
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on Sep 8th, 2015, 4:01pm, WVa_Jon wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Just curious, I've heard a lot about gearing but what exactly does it mean? For example, I once read about F-units being geared at "63:15" or something along those lines, and some ex-passenger units regeared for freight service. Any comments would be enlightening!

 
The gearing refers to the number of teeth on the gears. The small gear on the motor, or pinion gear in your example has 15 teeth. The larger gear, sometimes called ring gear, case gear or bull gear, on the wheel or axle has 63 teeth. The gear ratio from large to small is 63 to 15 or 63:15. As the pinion gear gets bigger and/or the ring gear gets smaller the potential top speed of the locomotive goes up and as the pinion gear gets smaller and/or the ring gear gets bigger the potential top speed of the locomotive goes down. A 62:15 gearing (4.133 to 1) will have a lower top speed than 60:17 (3.53 to 1). Some passenger units retained by RRs after Amtrak started were given freight gear ratios to run out the rest of their useful life in freight service.  
 
Henry


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McAdoo WG
Former Member
Re: FAIRBANKS MORSE TRAIN MASTER H-24-66
 
« Reply #8 on: Sep 8th, 2015, 5:54pm »
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on Sep 8th, 2015, 4:01pm, WVa_Jon wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Just curious, I've heard a lot about gearing but what exactly does it mean? For example, I once read about F-units being geared at "63:15" or something along those lines, and some ex-passenger units regeared for freight service. Any comments would be enlightening!
 
Second, if the "Jersey Boys" FM's were anything like the Reading's (just think of those colorful TM's in Don Ball's book, "America's Colorful Railroads"), I have to agree. That WOULD have been an impressive event, indeed!

 
WVa_Jon:
 
You bet!
 
Seeing a CNJ TRAINMASTER blast through stations which were "non stops" for its run was really something else; though they were equally impressive "slugging it out" on freights, it was the fast passenger runs that I thought they were REALLY able to "strut their stuff"!
 
I remember standing alongside one of these hulking behemoths at the old Jersey City terminal, while it awaited the highball.
 
A small boy could easily feel quite dwarfed by such a massive, hulking, bleating machine!
 
Back in 1964, it was not uncommon to see CNJ FM's hauling the "CRUSADER" or the Saturday "WALL STREET" to and from Jersey City; this was part of a locomotive mileage balancing agreement between the CNJ and the RDG.
 
RDG FM's, until 1963, could also be found working passenger runs between Harrisburg and Jersey City.
 
Those behemoths certainly could have made short work of hauling a herd of mastadons out of the La Brea Tar Pits.....
 
"Mc WG"


« Last Edit: Sep 8th, 2015, 6:41pm by CLASSB » Logged
McAdoo WG
Former Member
Re: FAIRBANKS MORSE TRAIN MASTER H-24-66
 
« Reply #9 on: Sep 8th, 2015, 6:07pm »
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on Sep 8th, 2015, 4:41pm, Henry wrote:       (Click here for original message)

 
The gearing refers to the number of teeth on the gears. The small gear on the motor, or pinion gear in your example has 15 teeth. The larger gear, sometimes called ring gear, case gear or bull gear, on the wheel or axle has 63 teeth. The gear ratio from large to small is 63 to 15 or 63:15. As the pinion gear gets bigger and/or the ring gear gets smaller the potential top speed of the locomotive goes up and as the pinion gear gets smaller and/or the ring gear gets bigger the potential top speed of the locomotive goes down. A 62:15 gearing (4.133 to 1) will have a lower top speed than 60:17 (3.53 to 1). Some passenger units retained by RRs after Amtrak started were given freight gear ratios to run out the rest of their useful life in freight service.  
 
Henry

 
 
Henry:
 
Detailed info; thanks for sharing with us.
 
Speaking of re-gearing; as long-haul passenger traffic dwindled on the EL from the mid- to late-60's before totally expiring in 1970, more and more of the E-8's were being regeared to haul tonnage.
 
The very last "passenger" E-8's on the EL were running on the Port Jervis line; they were replaced by new push-pull consists during 1974.
 
"Mc WG"


« Last Edit: Sep 8th, 2015, 10:36pm by CLASSB » Logged
ClydeDET
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Re: FAIRBANKS MORSE TRAIN MASTER H-24-66
 
« Reply #10 on: Sep 8th, 2015, 7:55pm »
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Thinking of F-Ms and submarines, our Fleet Subs (the ones that, after the last S-boats that had been in the Philippines when the War broke out were sunk or retired to training duty, carried the War to the Japanese) were powered with EMDs, F-Ms or HORs (known as "lady of the evenings" to the crews, and not successful - long sad story there, because the HORs COULD have been successful). The HOR boats all wound up re-powered, many (including probably the most famous of them all, Medal of Honor awardee Sam Dealey's HARDER) with F-Ms.

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