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Topic Summary
Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Jan 11th, 2011, 8:59pm
My grandparents lived between what was the Gravity RR loaded track and the light track above Plane one and the Gravity shops. That part of the light track later became the D&H's Honesdale branch. Using Shaughnessy's book, I was able to hike around the area in the 70's and check out the shop buildings.  
 
As this article states, the buildings were supposed to be saved. I wonder what happened?
Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Jan 11th, 2011, 9:03pm
These buildings were fun to wander around in. I remember that the floors had rails in then.
Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Jan 11th, 2011, 9:05pm
Another view
Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Jan 11th, 2011, 9:10pm
standing under the O&W. This is weeds and a parking lot today.
Posted by: montclaire Posted on: Jan 13th, 2011, 11:08am
How were they allowed to tear it down?
Posted by: Ashley_John Posted on: Jan 13th, 2011, 11:14am
on Jan 13th, 2011, 11:08am, montclaire wrote:       (Click here for original message)
How were they allowed to tear it down?

 
Just because a structure or site is listed on the Historical register, doesn't mean it's protected from being torn down.
 
JP
Posted by: montclaire Posted on: Jan 13th, 2011, 11:44am
Took the grant and ran, I suppose.
Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Jan 13th, 2011, 6:45pm
The area around the Plane one monument has been spruced up and looks better than in the 70's. There was a small foot bridge here across the brook that I took on the way to the D&H yard.
Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Jan 13th, 2011, 6:49pm
Waymart Gravity station. Neat little town.
Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Jan 13th, 2011, 6:54pm
Turning around you see this little gem. I would love to see it on a working section of the Gravity. Maybe someday...
 
Anyone have other photos of remains of the Gravity?
Posted by: montclaire Posted on: Jan 15th, 2011, 10:31pm
It's amazing that for the age of the gravity lines that passenger cars are still around.  Three out of four from the PCC and all from 1850.  Is that the only D&H one left?
Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Jan 17th, 2011, 7:37pm
There is one on display in Nay Aug Park in Scranton and my understanding is that a few others survive, but in what shape I don't know. I hope that this one may run on a working section some day.  We can dream!
Posted by: montclaire Posted on: Jan 18th, 2011, 3:02pm
Out of the four PCC cars, all circa 1850, three survive.  One is on display in Nay Aug, one is on display in Hawley, and a third is built into a residence.  The fourth was used as an office of sorts and eventually just decayed beyond saving.  
 
I have no idea as to the D&H cars though, outside of this one.
Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Jan 18th, 2011, 6:27pm
I always assumed that the car in Scranton was D&H, but I see it was PCC.
Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Jan 20th, 2011, 5:54pm
Since the Honesdale Branch row ran just above my Grandparents house, it was a favorite place of mine to walk. On a few occasions I walked all the way to the switchback. In the 70's with a few minor detours, you could easily follow the row and stay off of private property. The switchback was easy to see. but even then it was overgrown and difficult to walk on.  
 
Here is the only crossbuck I ever saw on the line. Rails were still in the pavement.
Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Jan 20th, 2011, 5:59pm
The is where the branch crossed Rt6. This is still easy to locate.
Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Jan 20th, 2011, 6:14pm
Coming from New Jersey, it seemed like real wilderness walking the branch.  
 
Questions:
 
Where did the branch leave the main? I remember an old unused track crossing Gordon Ave in the 70's.  
 
Also, it doesn't appear that the entire branch was abandoned at once. What I had heard is that part was kept to service breakers above Carbondale. Anyone know or have a map?  
Posted by: mike_nepa Posted on: Jan 24th, 2011, 5:24pm
One D&H gravity car is on display in the Honesdale Museum where the replica of the Stourbridge Lion is.  
 
Mike
 
 
 
on Jan 18th, 2011, 3:02pm, montclaire wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Out of the four PCC cars, all circa 1850, three survive.  One is on display in Nay Aug, one is on display in Hawley, and a third is built into a residence.  The fourth was used as an office of sorts and eventually just decayed beyond saving.  
 
I have no idea as to the D&H cars though, outside of this one.

Posted by: mike_nepa Posted on: Jan 24th, 2011, 5:29pm
I have explored part of this line, from where it breaks off the mainline near Archbald. I have a page on my old site with pictures and a few maps from different years showing how the line changed as sections were abandoned.
 
http://nepaview.piczo.com/?g=30422281
 
I followed it up to what the topo map calls "Nebraska" there is a housing development there and one particular homeowner who was very irate. I lost the railbed as it crossed the creek right there. Your pictures above indicate that another section might still be accessible, further up from the Nebraska section. Hmm, might have to put that in for a spring walk. Do you have any more info where it crossed at Route 6 ?  
 
Mike
 
 
 
 
on Jan 20th, 2011, 6:14pm, NEFAN wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Coming from New Jersey, it seemed like real wilderness walking the branch.  
 
Questions:
 
Where did the branch leave the main? I remember an old unused track crossing Gordon Ave in the 70's.  
 
Also, it doesn't appear that the entire branch was abandoned at once. What I had heard is that part was kept to service breakers above Carbondale. Anyone know or have a map?  

Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Jan 25th, 2011, 9:15pm
Mike - The section of the Honesdale branch that I am familiar with left the main in Carbondale and looped back over the town. I see on your site where the line from Archbald connected. The section that runs through Carbondale to "old" Rt6 is easy to locate on Google maps. I outlined it in red. It crosses "old" Rt6 about a 1/4 mile before the junction with "new" Rt6. It is still dirt and doesn't look much different than the photo from the '70's. ( the Chrysler is gone though  ) You can also follow it in White's Crossing which is above Simpson.  
I haven't walked it in many years, so if you go, take pics and let us know what you find.
Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Jan 28th, 2011, 9:10pm
Almost forgot about this one. In Waymart it is also possible to locate and follow the Honesdale branch which was is a different alignment than the Gravity it replaced.  
 
Here is the Honesdale branch station which is a few blocks away from the Gravity station. Nice to have this in your backyard.
Posted by: Geoff Posted on: Feb 2nd, 2011, 4:06pm
Here is a link to a Lackawanna County map Ca 1923 showing the layout of the Honesdale branch at Carbondale. Note that the branch had a wye with one leg going to Carbondale and the other towards Archbald: Scroll to the right margin to find Carbondale.
 
ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/pdf/BPR_PDF_FILES/Maps/Type_10_GHS_Historical_Scans/Lackawanna_1923.pdf
 
This second map is from 1953, notice the Honesdale Branch has been cut back below White's Crossing. The Switchback is gone, the honesdale branch was abandoned in 1931, but part of it was kept in service to allow rail access to the Coal Breaker above Carbondale. (Racket Brook Breaker?)
 
ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/pdf/BPR_PDF_FILES/Maps/Type_10_GHS_Historical_Scans/Lackawanna_1953.pdf
 
The 1966 map shows the leg to Archbald gone:
 
 
ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/pdf/BPR_PDF_FILES/Maps/Type_10_GHS_Historical_Scans/Lackawanna_1966.pdf
 
The 1980 map shows the abandoned Archbald Branch cut short of the wye and no evidence of the track above the wye:
 
ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/pdf/BPR_PDF_FILES/Maps/Type_10_GHS_Historical_Scans/Lackawanna_1980.pdf
 
Lots of missing info here, but the maps give a good idea of the track layout.
 
The former Honesdale branch is indeed interesting, having been in operation for just over 30 years.
Posted by: Geoff Posted on: Feb 2nd, 2011, 4:30pm
The next map shows the track layout for the Honesdale branch in Wayne County in 1916: Scroll halfway down the left margin to find Waymart.
ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/pdf/BPR_PDF_FILES/Maps/Type_10_GHS_Historical_Scans/Wayne_1916.pdf
 
Note how the steam Road had to use a loop track to loose altitude on the way to Honesdale! This almost mirrored the "Shepherd's Crook"on the old gravity line that was turned into a switchback because the loop was too tight for steam lokies.
The grades on the gravity were too steep for steam to utilize.
 
Posted by: mike_nepa Posted on: Feb 2nd, 2011, 5:54pm
That map is very helpful, I will have to go check this out when the snow melts. Of course I will post my findings.
 
Mike
 
 
 
 
on Jan 25th, 2011, 9:15pm, NEFAN wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Mike - The section of the Honesdale branch that I am familiar with left the main in Carbondale and looped back over the town. I see on your site where the line from Archbald connected. The section that runs through Carbondale to "old" Rt6 is easy to locate on Google maps. I outlined it in red. It crosses "old" Rt6 about a 1/4 mile before the junction with "new" Rt6. It is still dirt and doesn't look much different than the photo from the '70's. ( the Chrysler is gone though  ) You can also follow it in White's Crossing which is above Simpson.  
I haven't walked it in many years, so if you go, take pics and let us know what you find.

 
Posted by: Geoff Posted on: Feb 3rd, 2011, 11:40am
If the snow melts!
 
The steam RR station in Waymart is owned by a local historian IIRC. The stone base to the water tank is still there also, it is used for something (Garden Shed?) and has a door and roof. Water tank is long gone.  
 
The station at Farview still exists. It is owned by the prison and is in use, be careful if you take photos of it, they might get antsy given all this Homeland Security stuff currently in vogue. Farview was once a popular tourist stop.  
 
Remnants of the Honesdale branch and the north leg of the Wye still exist but mostly on private property. The wye itself is on some commercial property that is posted and off limits.  
 
Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Feb 3rd, 2011, 8:40pm
Hopefully we can all get out if the snow melts!  
 
Thanks for the map links.
Is that what that round building was? I though it was something out of a Harry Potter movie! Interesting.  
 
In the early 90's I worked for a Laboratory system company that installed systems in Jails in PA & NJ. After finishing up, I left the jail and drove over to the Fairview station to take a picture. I had just lifted my camera when I heard the dreaded "HEY YOU!!". A guard in a pickup truck wanted to know what I was up to since NO PICTURES were allowed anywhere near the jail. I told him that I was just going to shoot the station but he wouldn't allow it. He pointed toward the exit and I left.  
The last time I was in the area I noticed lots of warning signs, so I passed on trying that again.
Posted by: henryS Posted on: Feb 5th, 2011, 3:40pm
None of those map links don't open for me. Is anybody else having problems with this? Thanks!
 
Here's the message I get:
 
Safari can’t open the page.
Safari can’t open the page “ ftp://ftp.dot.state.pa.us/public/pdf/BPR_PDF_FILES/Maps/Type_10_GHS_Historical_Scans/Lackawanna_1980.pdf ”. The error is: “The operation couldn’t be completed. (NSURLErrorDomain error -1.)” (NSURLErrorDomain:-1) Please choose Safari > Report Bugs to Apple, note the error number, and describe what you did before you saw this message.
Posted by: henryS Posted on: Feb 5th, 2011, 3:51pm
OK, links seem to be working now. BTW, the 1923 map is inaccurate: it doesn't use the correct symbol for electric railroad for the L&WV (Laurel Line), a (mostly) outside third rail line betw. Scranton and W-B.
Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Feb 6th, 2011, 8:44am

[This second map is from 1953, notice the Honesdale Branch has been cut back below White's Crossing. The Switchback is gone, the honesdale branch was abandoned in 1931, but part of it was kept in service to allow rail access to the Coal Breaker above Carbondale. (Racket Brook Breaker?)
 
The Racket Brook Breaker was just on the other site of Rt6, so possibly it still was in business after 1931. (Anyone know for sure?) I was told that coal was still being loaded on the branch. This may have been minerun coal that was transported to another D&H breaker. Interesting stuff.
Posted by: mike_nepa Posted on: Feb 10th, 2011, 5:08pm
Sounds like exploring the northern section might be a problem.  
 
Mike
 
 
 
on Feb 3rd, 2011, 11:40am, Geoff wrote:       (Click here for original message)
If the snow melts!
 
The steam RR station in Waymart is owned by a local historian IIRC. The stone base to the water tank is still there also, it is used for something (Garden Shed?) and has a door and roof. Water tank is long gone.  
 
The station at Farview still exists. It is owned by the prison and is in use, be careful if you take photos of it, they might get antsy given all this Homeland Security stuff currently in vogue. Farview was once a popular tourist stop.  
 
Remnants of the Honesdale branch and the north leg of the Wye still exist but mostly on private property. The wye itself is on some commercial property that is posted and off limits.  
 

Posted by: Geoff Posted on: Feb 11th, 2011, 11:23am
When the Jail was built many artifacts of the gravity were removed. One of the stone posts was relocated to the parking overlook on Rt 6 that has the historical marker and lump of Anthracite.  
 
Part of the old roadbed has been obliterated by the prison.  
 
There was a publication done on the history of the Honesdale branch, it is listed on the Honesdale historical society's web page but is no longer available. Also the Historical Society has a VHS program on the branch, they had a showing at Steamtown several years ago.  
 
Would love to find a copy of either or both!
Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Feb 12th, 2011, 9:11am
on Feb 11th, 2011, 11:23am, Geoff wrote:       (Click here for original message)
When the Jail was built many artifacts of the gravity were removed. One of the stone posts was relocated to the parking overlook on Rt 6 that has the historical marker and lump of Anthracite.  
 
Part of the old roadbed has been obliterated by the prison.  
 
There was a publication done on the history of the Honesdale branch, it is listed on the Honesdale historical society's web page but is no longer available. Also the Historical Society has a VHS program on the branch, they had a showing at Steamtown several years ago.  
 
Would love to find a copy of either or both!

 
Sounds interesting, I didn't know they existed. I'll also have to see what is available.  
I added the yellow line to the map which shows the Gravity loaded track above plane one in Carbondale. In the 70's you could find it easily on the other side of Racket Brook. With the new housing, it may be more difficult to get to, but it should still be easy to locate.
Posted by: NKP759fan Posted on: Feb 12th, 2011, 10:09am
I'm sorry for my lack of presence in this forum Gentlemen, work has taken up most of my time LOL, but very interesting pics, keep em coming! I was offroading on the old PCC Gravity Railroad in the Elmhurst Area and went through the old tunnel carved out of solid rock, very amazing how intact it still is. Although it's not D&H related, I will post pics of it along with many other relics of that era!
Posted by: mike_nepa Posted on: Feb 14th, 2011, 5:45pm
I too have offroaded that area and been through the old gravity tunnel. There are some remains of the planes in the area. There is also an old trolley line that once served Moosic Lakes when it was an amusement park. The pictures are posted on my site. (the old one for now until I move them over)
 
Mike
   
 
on Feb 12th, 2011, 10:09am, NKP759fan wrote:       (Click here for original message)
I'm sorry for my lack of presence in this forum Gentlemen, work has taken up most of my time LOL, but very interesting pics, keep em coming! I was offroading on the old PCC Gravity Railroad in the Elmhurst Area and went through the old tunnel carved out of solid rock, very amazing how intact it still is. Although it's not D&H related, I will post pics of it along with many other relics of that era!

Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Mar 25th, 2011, 6:45pm
on Feb 6th, 2011, 8:44am, NEFAN wrote:       (Click here for original message)

[This second map is from 1953, notice the Honesdale Branch has been cut back below White's Crossing. The Switchback is gone, the honesdale branch was abandoned in 1931, but part of it was kept in service to allow rail access to the Coal Breaker above Carbondale. (Racket Brook Breaker?)
 
The Racket Brook Breaker was just on the other site of Rt6, so possibly it still was in business after 1931. (Anyone know for sure?) I was told that coal was still being loaded on the branch. This may have been minerun coal that was transported to another D&H breaker. Interesting stuff.

 
It looks like the Racket Brook Breaker was in business until 1957. It's out put was very low, so I doubt it was still a rail shipper at that time. I'm still interested in finding out when the track above Carbondale was finally ripped out.
Posted by: dhsxdf Posted on: Oct 25th, 2012, 11:15pm
The question was asked how did they get to the Honesdale Branch from the D&H main at Carbondale.
Just North of Pike St. on track #2 was a switch call Lookout Jct. which took you onto the Honesdale Branch. Later yeas after Honesdale Branch was removed it was called the Racket Brook Lead which ended at a point north of Wayne St. (it crossed Wayne St.) The track ran along side Courtland Ave to the Racket Brook Breaker. (I knew it in my time as the Jim Beddy Breaker) The tracks (2) extended all way to Lincoln Ave were empty hoppers were kept. This area is still a empty lot on the South side of Lincoln Ave,( 4 houses East of Marion Community Hospital)if you look north it is now Morgan St and is now paved, follow to E. Garfield Ave, North side of  E. Garfield the right of way is still visable, should be able to follow it to Rt 6.
About one or two miles South of Wayne St there was another switch called Quackenbush and went to the DeAgelis Breaker which was located behind Russell Park sports field. Operations on this lead end in 1970 - 71. The DeAgelis breaked worked many years later with the use of trucks. I am not sure when it finally closed, I think it had a fire that did it in. I am not sure when the Racket Brook Breaker closed and when the tracks were taken up.
I do hope this helped you guys out. If anyone would like me to show you some of  the area I would only be happy to do it.
tpeagle@echoes.net
Posted by: dhsxdf Posted on: Oct 25th, 2012, 11:53pm
I want to make a correction to my last post.
 
It is not Morgan St it is Morgan Place, I forgot they had to change it from St. to Pl. city already had a Morgan St.
The switch to the DeAngelis breaker is Bushwick not Quackenbush, where I got that I will never know, that's what happens when you get old.
Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Oct 27th, 2012, 10:19am
thanks - Great information! I walked most of that branch back in the mid 70's, but it was torn up by that time. I have a photo I took of a crossbuck posted here. It was where the branch crossed over Wayne St near that retaining wall.  
 
I remember the line crossing Pike St. I thought is was on Gordon, but my memory is from along time ago also.  
 
I find it interesting that the branch existed up to Lincoln ave  into the 70's. Where exactly was the Jim Beddy breaker street location? Amazing that it was that close to the hospital.  
 
I am familiar with the DeAgelis Breaker. Most of those old breakers seemed to have burnt down in their last years.
 
The D&H also served the Powderly breaker. Would you know when that trackage was last used?
Posted by: dhsxdf Posted on: Oct 27th, 2012, 3:59pm
The Racket Brook Breaker and the Jim Beddy breaker were one in the same, it changed oweners over the years.
The Powderly Breaker was long gone but sideing was still used for a long while. The sideing was fixed up in the late 70's and coal loading plant was being built at the Northend of Carbondale Yard behind ready mix co. There was a deal in the making about using the culm for fuel, it was to be shipped to Korea and there were test loads sent to the docks in New Jersey that were shipped to Korea. The hoppers were loaded at the Powderly sideing. It was to be used in their power plants. There were great expectations on all sides and the Koreans felt that it was a good enough grade to use in their power plants. For some reason the deal fell through and that was the end. The steel was up for the loading plant and thats where it stood for a few years until some one took it down.
I had some pictures taken when the inspection train was in Carbondale  looking at the plant being built. I cannot find those pictures if I do I will scan them for all to see.
Posted by: dhsxdf Posted on: Oct 27th, 2012, 6:09pm
Here is the photo I promised of the inspection train. If you look on the left side over PA 19 you will see the steel work of the breaker.
Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Oct 27th, 2012, 8:34pm
Wow - amazing. I barely remembered that structure and I never thought the PA's visited the yard. You may want to post this in the D&H in Carbondale area too. - Wow.
 
The Culm banks have mostly disappeared from the valley. That bank north of the Carbondale yard though, seems about the same as I remember years ago.
Posted by: TJ_1867 Posted on: Oct 28th, 2012, 10:20pm
  Lookout Jct, was a term we used even when i hired out, although the tracks where gone by then. On a northbound freight, if you got an approach signal for DF Cabin, the freight would be required to stop at Pike Street, as to not block the crossings in Carbondale, the headman would go and punch up the gates at the crossing cabin, and then call the Hudson Operator from the block line phone, and tell him you where at "Lookout Jct." So even when they tore the tracks out, they kept the names.
 
            TJ
Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Oct 29th, 2012, 9:56am
That is very interesting. I wonder where the name "lookout Jct" came from? The line did have some great views above Carbondale and Simpson. I remember walking it in the 70's and you could look down the mountain from above Simpson and see the valley & D&H Penn Division tracks below.
Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Nov 11th, 2012, 6:53pm
Does any one know of a detailed RR map Of Honesdale cira 1940's? There is some track next to the road at a higher elevation than the LASB track downtown.  There is also a coal loader on the same roadway. I assume it was ERIE, but it could be D&H.
Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Jun 23rd, 2014, 8:46pm
Found this interesting post card. It has the caption "Single Loop D.H. Ry" on the back and someone wrote Carbondale Pa.
 
While it looks like a Gravity train, notice the steam engine in the front. I know the D&H attempted to use steam on parts of the Gravity but not sure where this is.
Posted by: Matthew_L Posted on: Jun 30th, 2014, 8:23pm
Interesting! That curve looks very tight.
Posted by: wm1111 Posted on: Jun 30th, 2014, 8:41pm
Locomotive almost appears to be a narrow gauge Porter.
 
wm
Posted by: mike_nepa Posted on: Jul 3rd, 2014, 6:52pm
I wonder if that is a picture of Shepards Crook. Part of that gravity section was used as a locomotive route. The map I have is from the late 1800's when it was still the light track of the gravity. It was modified for a steam locomotive route and that might explain the bridge that is seen in the postcard.
 
Nice find!  
Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Jul 6th, 2014, 10:32am
It could be since the D&H tried to run locomotives on parts of the gravity. This  may be before they changed over to the switchback.  
 
The post card is from Germany, so there may be some artistic license with the tracks and terrain.
Posted by: mike_nepa Posted on: Jul 9th, 2014, 4:53pm
There is information out there that does show they did indeed convert part of the Gravity to a locomotive route. What became the Archbald and Honesdale branches were part of the light track of the Gravity.
 
Mike
Posted by: mike_nepa Posted on: Aug 17th, 2016, 11:08am
This year I found a small bridge along the Honesdale Branch, near Childs. Still has the span and ties, rails long gone. The abutments do look like they are from the gravity era.
Posted by: NEFAN Posted on: Aug 24th, 2016, 4:42pm
Nice find. I'm sure some of the bridges and such were retained when the gravity was changed to a steam RR.
Posted by: Matthew_L Posted on: May 31st, 2017, 8:43pm
Artifacts of the grvity RR have been found!  
 
Quote:
WHITE MILLS - An avid, amateur history detective, Clark Williams surprised the Wayne County Historical Society, April 22, with a rare artifact of the gravity railroad that operated in Hawley.
 
Williams set the corroded, double iron wheels and approximately four foot length of old strap iron on the Society’s display table at the Thomas Kennedy Local History Festival. The annual event, bringing together numerous local organizations that promote local history, met at the Dorflinger Glass Factory Museum in White Mills for the first time.
 
Williams, who loves exploring local history- on foot and in the field- explained he found these artifacts about 15 years ago on a Palmyra Township farm adjacent to the Marble Hill neighborhood, immediately outside the Borough of Hawley and off Old Gravity Road. He stopped by one day on his motorcycle, and inquired at the resident’s house if he knew anything about old gravity railroad leftovers that Williams knew might be on the man’s land.
 
<snipped>
 
What he found
 
The two wheels he presented, were pulleys that were inserted side by side in the middle of the track on Plane #13. These wheels served to keep the cable in place and smoothly rolling.
 
The strap iron is a section of the rail. The rail shows a tongue and groove at the ends, where it fit in place between other sections.

 
The full article can be read at: http://www.neagle.com/news/20170501/pulleys-rail-from-gravity-rr-found-near-hawley
Posted by: mike_nepa Posted on: Jun 25th, 2017, 8:06am
I walked along plane 10 one day with a metal detector and I found all this within 2 hours.  
I actually found more spikes, but did not keep them, there are still artifacts to find.
 
Mike
Posted by: Matthew_L Posted on: Jun 26th, 2017, 8:07pm
Excellent find!
Posted by: mike_nepa Posted on: Nov 12th, 2017, 7:30am
I have found 6 sections of strap rail so far but only parts of pulleys. Have yet to find one intact.