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Roll call
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BNSF_1088
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Roll call
 
« on: Mar 18th, 2006, 11:53am »
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Published: Saturday, March 18, 2006
 
Roll call
 
 
 
Here's how area members of Congress were recorded on major roll call votes in the week ending March 17.
 
U.S. House
 
U.S. port operations
 
Voting 38-377, the House on March 15 refused to strip a pending appropriations bill (HR 4939) of language that would prevent Dubai Ports World, a company owned by Dubai of the United Arab Emirates, from operating any U.S. port. The ban was added to the bill before the company's announcement March 9 that it would relinquish an entity that operates terminals at six major U.S. ports.
 
A yes vote was to strip the ban from the bill.
 
Voting yes: Jim McDermott, D-7, Dave Reichert, R-8, Adam Smith, D-9
 
Voting no: Jay Inslee, D-1, Rick Larsen, D-2, Brian Baird, D-3, Doc Hastings, R-4, Cathy McMorris, R-5, Norman Dicks, D-6
 
War, Katrina spending
 
Voting 348-71, the House on March 16 approved $91.1 billion in deficit spending for the current fiscal year, including $67.6 billion for operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, $19 billion for Gulf Coast hurricane recovery and $4.1 billion in foreign aid. The emergency appropriations bill (HR 4939), which awaits Senate debate, would raise total Iraq-Afghanistan outlays to about $400 billion since Sept. 11, 2001.
 
The bill includes $2 billion for countering roadside bombs; $850 million for upgraded armor for Abrams tanks and Bradley Fighting Vehicles; $480 million for better Humvee armor; $485 million for training Iraqi and Afghan forces; and $423 million for small-scale Iraq reconstruction projects ordered by U.S. field commanders.
 
A yes vote was to pass the bill.
 
Voting yes: Larsen, Baird, Hastings, Dicks, Reichert, Smith
 
Voting no: Inslee, McDermott
 
Not voting: McMorris
 
Deficit dispute
 
Voting 89-332, the House on March 16 defeated an amendment to strip HR 4939 (above) of its $19 billion for Gulf Coast hurricane recovery, on the grounds that the sum is not emergency spending.
 
A yes vote backed a separate bill for hurricane recovery.
 
Voting no: Inslee, Larsen, Baird, Hastings, McMorris, Dicks, McDermott, Reichert, Smith
 
U.S. port security
 
Voting 208-210, the House on March 16 defeated an amendment to HR 4939 (above) to increase spending for U.S. port security by $1.2 billion in fiscal 2006. In part, the amendment sought to expand overseas container inspections to all 140 ports that ship directly to the United States, more than tripling the number of ports doing such inspections.
 
A yes vote backed the amendment.
 
Voting yes: Inslee, Larsen, Baird, Dicks, McDermott, Smith
 
Voting no: Hastings, McMorris, Reichert
 
U.S. Senate
 
U.S. port security
 
Voting 43-53, senators on March 15 refused to increase security spending for ports in the fiscal 2007 budget resolution (S Con Res 83) by $965 million. The funds were to be obtained by closing unspecified corporate tax loopholes. The budget had already authorized $4 billion for border and port security in 2007. About $600 million of the $965 million add-on was to be granted directly to U.S. ports; $155 million was for installing container-screening technology; $100 million was for hiring 400 additional port inspectors, and $100 million was for research and development.
 
A yes vote backed the amendment.
 
Voting yes: Maria Cantwell, D, Patty Murray, D
 
"Pay as you go"
 
On a tie vote of 50-50, senators on March 14 refused to reinstate "pay as you go" fiscal discipline to S Con Res 83 (above). Under "pay-as-you-go," cuts in taxes or increases in mandatory spending programs, such as Medicare and Social Security, must be offset elsewhere in the budget so they don't add to annual deficits. If not offset, they need 60 votes for approval. The plan was a congressional budgeting tool from 1991-2002, and was then dropped to facilitate Bush administration tax cuts, among other reasons.
 
Kent Conrad, D-N.D., said: "We had a strong pay-go rule in effect from 1991 until 2002. ... We went into surplus to such an extent we stopped raiding Social Security trust funds to pay other bills. Then our colleagues on the other side got control of the White House and both houses of Congress, and they ended the pay-go rule."
 
Judd Gregg, R-N.H., said pay-go "sounds like something that makes sense. But to be honest, what pay-go is, is a tax increase. It is that simple. ... It is doing it through a technical vehicle, but it is clearly going to have that result."
 
A yes vote was to reinstate pay-go.
 
Voting yes: Cantwell, Murray
 
Medicare drug plan
 
On a tie vote of 49-49, the Senate on March 15 refused to extend the sign-up deadline for the new Medicare prescription-drug benefit from May 15 to Dec. 31. The amendment to S Con Res 83 (above) also would have allowed participants to change plans once during 2006 without penalty. In a separate vote, senators gave the secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services discretion to extend the May 15 deadline, allow a penalty-free, one-time change in plans during the extended period, and waive any other penalties incurred during the extension.
 
A yes vote was to set a Dec. 31, 2006, sign-up deadline.
 
Voting yes: Cantwell, Murray
 
Amtrak budget
 
Voting 44-53, senators on March 15 defeated an amendment to increase the Amtrak budget in S Con Res 58 (above) by $550 million, to the $1.45 billion needed to fully operate the rail passenger agency. The $550 million was to have been raised by closing unspecified corporate tax loopholes.
 
A yes vote was to fully fund Amtrak.
 
Voting yes: Cantwell, Murray
 
Debt ceiling increase
 
Senators on March 16 voted, 52-48, to raise the national debt ceiling by $781 billion, to $8.965 trillion, so the Treasury can continue to pay its bills. The measure (HJ Res 47) took effect immediately.
 
Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, said the national debt has risen by about $3 trillion since President Bush took office, with "about 30 percent of the increase" attributable to the president's tax cuts.
 
"The rest of this increase ... is due to the recession, the war in Iraq, and the increased spending on homeland security, also related to the war on terror," he said.
 
Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., said the bill "allows this administration to continue to rack up another $800 billion on the nation's credit card," in contrast to five years ago, when "we were debating what to do with the largest surplus in the nation's history, $5.6 trillion."
 
A yes vote was to raise the national debt ceiling.
 
Voting no: Cantwell, Murray
 
2007-2011 federal budget
 
Voting 51-49, the Senate on March 16 approved a five-year budget (S Con Res 83) that sets Republican revenue, spending and deficit policies through fiscal 2011. For 2007, the blueprint envisions nearly $2.8 trillion in spending and a deficit of $359 billion. The bill caps discretionary domestic spending at $889 billion in 2007 while allowing major increases for defense and homeland security along with robust entitlement growth. Medicare spending will rise by $55 billion, or 17 percent. The measure awaits House action.
 
Budget Committee Chairman Judd Gregg, R-N.H., said he would have liked to impose entitlements restraint, "but that is not possible, primarily because I get no votes from the (Democratic) side of the aisle."
 
Kent Conrad, D-N.D., said the GOP budget "increases the debt $600 billion a year, each and every year of its term. ... This budget explodes the debt."
 
A yes vote was to approve the budget plan.
 
Voting no: Cantwell, Murray
 
Entitlement curbs
 
Voting 43-57, senators on March 16 defeated an amendment to slow the growth of entitlement spending by $10 billion over the next five years. President Bush has asked Congress to impose $65 billion in curbs over five years in programs such as Medicare and Medicaid, but the underlying measure (S Con Res 83, above) disregards his request. This amendment sought to impose some of the Medicare cuts sought by Bush.
 
John Cornyn, R-Texas, said "if we don't do something in the next 30 years about entitlement spending, we won't have a dime of revenue to pay for other items that are important, such as defense, education ... and payments to health care providers."
 
Kent Conrad, D-N.D., said the "good faith" amendment was technically flawed in its approach to curbing Medicare spending.
 
A yes vote backed the amendment.
 
Voting no: Cantwell, Murray
 
Thomas Voting Reports  


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BNSF_1088
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Re: Roll call
 
« Reply #1 on: Mar 18th, 2006, 11:54am »
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on Mar 18th, 2006, 11:53am, BNSF_1088 wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Published: Saturday, March 18, 2006
 
Roll call
 
 
 
Here's how area members of Congress were recorded on major roll call votes in the week ending March 17.
 
U.S. House
 
 
Amtrak budget
 
Voting 44-53, senators on March 15 defeated an amendment to increase the Amtrak budget in S Con Res 58 (above) by $550 million, to the $1.45 billion needed to fully operate the rail passenger agency. The $550 million was to have been raised by closing unspecified corporate tax loopholes.
 
A yes vote was to fully fund Amtrak.
 
Voting yes: Cantwell, Murray
 



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