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Santa Fe Passenger Diesels
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   Author  Topic: Santa Fe Passenger Diesels  (Read 3754 times)
Norm_Anderson
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Santa Fe Passenger Diesels
 
« on: May 1st, 2004, 10:50pm »
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The Santa Fe was among the most energetic of passenger Diesel customers, amassing large fleets of locomotives to power their many varnish runs.  What follows here is an attempt to present these purchases in chronological order, with incidental discussions of the numbering system.  Note:  With one or two exceptions, the Diesels here are presented as originally delivered and numbered; the many re-numberings of subsequent years have been masterfully detailed elsewhere.
 
 
EMC,  "Boxcab" Type
 
In the Summer of 1935, Santa Fe took delivery of two 1,800-hp Diesel Road Engines from Electro-Motive Corporation (EMC).  Though EMC had long been active in the production of "doodlebug"-type motive power, these were among the very first true Road Engines, able to be "plugged into" the front end of any train.  Each unit contained an Operator's Cab, so it could be operated independently, but in practice they were almost always operated as a pair.  Santa Fe gave them the operating Road Numbers 1 and 1A (some sources insist they were originally numbered 1A and 1B; however, the preponderance of the evidence seems to support the former).  However they were numbered, they were quickly accorded the nicknames "Amos 'n Andy", after an immensely popular radio comedy duo of the time.   The engines were subjected to rigorous performance trials throughout the Autumn and Winter of 1935-36, and their dependability so impressed Santa Fe management that the decision was made to launch a brand-new premium passenger service utilizing the new and revolutionary power.  Thus was born the Super Chief on May 12, 1936.
 
 
EMD,  Model "E-1"
 
These 1,800-hp units were, internally, not much different from the Boxcabs of 1935.  But oh, Brother, what a difference on the outside!  EMC had been purchased by General Motors, which turned the company into its Electro-Motive Division.  EMD's stylistic department introduced the innovations that would be the basis for all the "E"-series and "F"-series units to follow over the next three decades, not least of which was the striking new "Warbonnet" paint scheme.  The E-1s came in two variants: those with an operator's cab, called "A-units", and cabless boosters, called "B-units".  Santa Fe adopted the somewhat confusing practice of labeling A-units by number only, and B-units with the suffix "A".  Thus, Locomotive No. 2 is an "A-unit", and locomotive No. 2A is a "B-unit", not an "A-unit".  Santa Fe's E-1 fleet was as follows (numbers in parentheses indicate year built or delivered):
 
2 and 2A  (1937)     powered original streamlined Super Chief
 
3 and 3A  (1938 )     powered second streamlined Super Chief
 
4 and 4A  (1938 )     backup power for the Super Chief
 
5  (1938 )     El Capitan
 
6  (1938 )     El Capitan
 
7  (1938 )     San Diegan
 
8  (1938 )     Golden Gate*
 
9  (1938 )     Golden Gate*
 
*   Units 8 and 9 first spent two months in Kansas Cityan/Chicagoan service.
 
Units 5 through 9 operated alone-- each locomotive powered one short consist.
 
 


« Last Edit: Jul 3rd, 2004, 2:31pm by Norm_Anderson » Logged
Norm_Anderson
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Re: Santa Fe Passenger Diesels
 
« Reply #1 on: May 1st, 2004, 10:59pm »
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The First Rebuilds:
 
In late 1938, original 1935 Boxcabs 1 and 1A apparently suffered an on-board fire, and were recalled by the Topeka Shops.  During the rebuilding, the units had their cabs raised to provide better grade-crossing protection, and had slightly rounded noses applied, as well as a "Warbonnet" paint treatment.  Lucius Beebe opined that their new, heavy-browed look was somewhat "menacing" (perhaps so, to an observer at trackside) but it was Karl Zimmermann who nailed it, saying they looked "like E-1s that had run into a brick wall".  The engines also emerged with different numbers: No. 1 became No. 10, and No. 1A became the "new" No. 1.  These units were then assigned to the Kansas Cityan and Chicagoan streamliners, running between Chicago and Wichita.
 
(In 1940, No. 10 was reconfigured again, this time emerging as a cabless booster unit.)
 
 
EMD, Model "E-3":
 
 
11 and 11A were an A-B pair purchased in 1939, and were the only set of E-3s owned by Santa Fe.
 
 
ALCo, Model "DL-109/DL-110":
 
In 1940, Santa Fe took delivery of a single A-B pair of these first-generation ALCos.  The cab-equipped "A-unit" was Model DL-109, and the cabless booster was Model DL-110.  Santa Fe assigned them numbers
 
50 and 50A
 
 
 
 
EMD, Model "E-6":
 
In 1940 and 1941, Santa Fe purchased the following:
 
12 and 12A
 
13 and 13A
 
14 (a solo unit-- there was no 14A)
 
15 and 15A
 
 


« Last Edit: May 1st, 2004, 11:41pm by Norm_Anderson » Logged
Norm_Anderson
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Re: Santa Fe Passenger Diesels
 
« Reply #2 on: May 2nd, 2004, 12:40am »
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EMD, Model "FT":
 
 
EMD's "F-series" was designed for freight service, but its popularity and performance exceeded aven the builder's expectations.  Each unit was rated at 1,350 horsepower, making a total of 5,400 horsepower for each four-unit set.  EMD's sales pitch, in a world of 40-foot (and 40-ton) freight cars, was that no Dispatcher would ever call a train that 5,400 horsepower couldn't get over the road on time.  The FT, then, was billed as all the locomotive a railroad would ever need.  Beginning in 1940, Santa Fe was among the first to place orders for these rugged and versatile machines.  In fact, Santa Fe ordered the very first production-model FT, and issued it Road Number 100.  From 1940 through 1945, Santa Fe would order a total of 80 four-unit FT sets.
 
In keeping with then-standard Santa Fe practice, the "A-unit" would receive Number 100 (or 100L); the first "B-unit" would be numbered 100A; the second "B-unit" would be Number 100B, and the trailing "A-unit" would carry Number 100C.  (I have to again thank author Karl Zimmermann for pointing out that there was an initial dispute with the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers over what to do with that second "A-unit".  This was uncharted territory for Santa Fe.  All Diesel purchases up 'til then (with the exception of the 1935 Boxcabs) had been single "A-units" or else A-B pairs.  The BLE position was that two "A-units" means two cabs, thus technically equalling two locomotives, which needed to be staffed by two locomotive crews.  Until the issue could be sorted out, Santa Fe ordered some of its earliest four-unit FT sets in A-B-B-B configuration.)
 
However they were configured, it was bound to be confusing for the novice...
 
"That 135A, is that an A-unit?"   "No, it's a B-unit".
 
"Then what about 135B?"     "That's a B-unit, too."
 
"Then is 135C a C-unit?"     "No, it's an A-unit."
 
"But I thought they were F-units..."   "Yeah, but..."
 
"Who's on First?"     "I dunno..."
 
"THIRD BASE!!!"
 
 
By the time Santa Fe decided to try out the FT in passenger service, World War II had erupted, and the War Production Board had restricted EMD to building freight units only.  Not until the final months of the War, in 1945, was Santa Fe allowed to purchase a four-unit FT set expressly outfitted for passenger service (though it came dressed in the blue-and-yellow freight paint scheme!)  This set, No. 167 LABC, was a tremendous success.  As quickly as practicable, Santa Fe sent ten other already-owned FT sets back to EMD for refitting as passenger units.  These units returned wearing the dazzling red-and-silver "Warbonnet" paint scheme.  In a bit of irony, No. 167 (the first "Passenger FTs" to arrive on the property) remained in their blue-and-yellow livery all through the refurbishing of the other FT sets, and were the last FTs to receive the Warbonnet.
 
After a few years, as newer F-3s and F-7s became commonplace, the "Passenger FTs" were repainted again, back into their blue-and-yellow freight livery.
 
To recap:
 
100 LABC through 156 LABC were freight FTs.
 
157 LABC through 168 LABC were the "Passenger FTs"
 
169 LABC through 179 LABC were freight FTs.
 


« Last Edit: May 2nd, 2004, 1:16pm by Norm_Anderson » Logged
EvergreenRailfan
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Re: Santa Fe Passenger Diesels
 
« Reply #3 on: May 2nd, 2004, 12:43am »
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The Santa Fe used "passengerized" versions of GE U-Boats for some of the trains. Did they ever get to be used on the Chiefs, specifically the Super Chief and the San Francisco Chief? If not, what services were they used on?

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Norm_Anderson
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Re: Santa Fe Passenger Diesels
 
« Reply #4 on: May 2nd, 2004, 12:50am »
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Hi, Evergreen,
 
I'm getting a little ahead of myself here, but second-generation power was: ten GE U-28CGs (delivered in 1966), normally assigned to the Texas Chief; six washboard-sided U-30CGs (1967) were often found on the San Diegans and the truncated, final-years version of the Grand Canyon; and, of course, the nine massive, clean-lined FP-45s (also 1967) were purchased expressly for The Super Chief.
 
Regards,
 
Norm


« Last Edit: May 2nd, 2004, 12:55am by Norm_Anderson » Logged
Norm_Anderson
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Re: Santa Fe Passenger Diesels
 
« Reply #5 on: May 2nd, 2004, 12:55pm »
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EMD, Model "F-3"
 
 
After the War, EMD unveiled its new, updated, 1,500-horsepower Model F-3.  Once again, Santa Fe was an eager buyer, purchasing 21 four-unit, 6,000-hp sets in 1946.  The railroad's last prewar EMD passenger power were E-6 pair 15 and 15A; therefore, the arriving F-3s took up the numbering sequence where the E-6s had left off.  Thus, the F-3s were numbered from 16 LABC to 36LABC.
 
 
A Brief Note about Number Boards:  The "L" (for "Lead") locomotive never displayed the "L" in its number boards-- the designation appeared on paper, and in the small painted-on number, in black lettering superimposed on the narrow red "Warbonnet" stripe, at the rear bottom corner of the locomotive.  In addition, a small black letter "L" could be found centered in the vertical yellow "nose stripe", just above the pilot beam and below the large "Santa Fe" oval.  (And no, contrary to what many railfans of the day insisted with a wink, the "L" did not stand for "Lionel"!)  Thus, the Number Boards on unit 19L would read simply 19.  The "C" unit, however, did display that designation in Number Boards reading 19C.  These units also had a small "C" on the nose stripe where the "L" was affixed on the Lead unit.  [FTs, with square number-windows in the locomotives' sides, did not display the "C" suffix.]
 
 
Fairbanks-Morse,  "Erie-Builts":
 
Santa Fe purchased only one three-unit, 6,000-hp set of these locomotives, an A-B-A trio delivered in 1946 and numbered
 
90L  -  90A  -  90B
 
 
 
 
ALCo,  Model "PA":
 
 
Beginning in 1946, and continuing through 1948, Santa Fe purchased twenty-eight "A-units" and sixteen "B-units" of this muscularly stylish 2,000-hp locomotive.  The first dozen sets were delivered in A-B-A configurations totalling 6,000 horsepower.  The prewar ALCo DL-109/DL-110 pair were numbered 50 and 50A, so the twelve postwar ALCo PA sets were numbered 51 LAB  to  62 LAB.
 
In 1948, Santa Fe ordered four more A-B pairs of PAs, and assigned them numbers 70 LA to 73 LA.
 
"But wait a minute," I hear you cry.  "Why the gap between 62 and 70?"  Glad you asked, my sharp-eyed friend...  Here's why:
 
Santa Fe decided to convert its A-B-A sets to A-B sets, and the trailing "A-units" were re-numbered.  (Remember, the following are all "A-units"):  51B was renumbered 63, 52B was renumbered 64, 53B was renumbered 65, and so on.  My source says this renumbering occurred in 1949, but I suspect this may be a typo: unless Santa Fe was unusually foresighted, it seems unlikely they would have deliberately created a "gap" in the numbering, just knowing it would be filled-in later.  it seems more reasonable to assume that renumbering occurred before the 1948 delivery of the A-B pairs, or else the A-B pairs were delivered later than 1948.  I'm betting on the former...
 
To recap:  After the dust settled, Santa Fe's PA fleet contained twenty-eight "A-units", numbered 51 through 78, and sixteen "B-units", numbered 51A through 62A, and 70A through 73A.


« Last Edit: Jul 3rd, 2004, 2:39pm by Norm_Anderson » Logged
Norm_Anderson
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Re: Santa Fe Passenger Diesels
 
« Reply #6 on: May 2nd, 2004, 1:42pm »
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EMD, Model "F-7":
 
The 1,500-horsepower F-7 became the most popular first-generation Diesel locomotive produced by any locomotive builder.  Santa Fe fielded a vast fleet of F-7s, in both freight and passenger service.  The first passenger F-7s began to arrive in 1949, and carried Road Numbers continuing the series where the F-3s had left off:
 
In 1949, four sets numbered 37 LABC to 41 LABC.
 
Then, in 1952, six more sets, numbered 42 LABC to 47 LABC.
 
 
At the same time, Santa Fe began to retrofit many of their F-3s with the newer style of fans and radiator grilles, so that to all but the most dedicated rivet-counter, the two looked virtually identical (this was in fact Santa Fe's intent).  The surest way to tell is by the unit's number.  Some have supposed that all passenger Fs with two-digit numbers were F-3s, and that the F-7s were all numbered in the 300 series.  Not so: F-3s ran only to unit 36.  F-units numbered 37 or higher are F-7s, not F-3s.
 
*  Santa Fe also maintained a large fleet of blue-and-yellow freight F-7s, carrying the updated and simplified freight paint scheme.  These eighty-one four-unit sets carried numbers 200 LABC to 280 LABC.
 
The next large batch of Passenger F-7s could not continue the current numbering series, which had reached to Number 47.  Numbers 50 through 74 were held by ALCo locomotives; 100's were assigned to the freight FTs; 200's were assigned to the freight F-7s.  Therefore, the Passenger F-7s that began to arrive in 1953 were assigned numbers in the 300 series.  They were numbered 300 LABC to 344 LABC.  (Well, maybe not exactly-- a source, now forgotten, suggested that some of these later F-7 purchases were only A-B pairs, so some of the higher 300s may only have been designated LA.  Unfortunately, I don't know which specific ones these are.  If I find the source again, I'll modify this post and properly credit the source with a link.)
 
 
EMD, Model "E-8m":
 
Santa Fe fielded a fleet of E-8 locomotives (eight "A-units" plus five "B-units") which were not purchased new from EMD.  Rather, they were actually the original E-1 fleet, plus the two 1935 Boxcabs, dressed up and refitted for contemporary service.  This rebuilding took place in 1952 and 1953.  These E-8m units were numbered 80 through 87, and 80A through 84A.


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Norm_Anderson
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Re: Santa Fe Passenger Diesels
 
« Reply #7 on: May 2nd, 2004, 2:03pm »
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SECOND-GENERATION POWER:
 
 
GE,  Model "U-28CG":
 
 
During the mid-1960s, as other railroads were frantically trying to divest themselves of their passenger operations, Santa Fe was still purchasing brand-new motive power for its passenger trains.  First to arrive, in 1966, were ten General Electric "U-boats", specially modified for passenger service.  Their assigned Road Numbers, 350 through 359, even continued the numbering series used by the F-7 fleet.  But despite their passenger gearing, steam generators, and the splashy red-and-silver "Warbonnet" paint scheme, these locomotives still managed to shout "Freight Train Coming!" everywhere they went.  These units could usually be found, in pairs operated "pachyderm-style", at the head of the Texas Chief.
 
 
GE,  Model "U-30CG":
 
 
The following year, 1967, saw the arrival of six new, 3,000-hp U-30CGs.  General Electric tried to give these units a more "passenger-looking" appearance, with full-width carbodies, a somewhat rounded nose, and ribbed side panels.  The results received mixed reviews.  These units were usually assigned to Southern California runs, where they could be seen, operating solo, powering such trains as the San Diegan or the last-years, three- or four-car incarnation of the Grand Canyon.  (Some Southern California railfans referred to the U-30CGs as "Uglies").  The six units were numbered 400 through 405.
 
 
 
EMD,  Model "FP-45":
 
 
Also delivered in 1967 were nine massive, Warbonneted 3,600-horsepower FP-45s, the most powerful passenger locomotives Santa Fe ever purchased, specifically to power the flagship Super Chief/El Capitan.  Assigned in pairs and operated "pachyderm-style", they carried Trains 17 and 18 between Chicago and Barstow, Calif. (aging F-units still did the honors over Cajon Pass into Los Angeles).  In contrast to the freight-unit appearance of the U-28CGs and U-30CGs, these FP-45 "cowl units" were clean-lined, almost sleek in their own angular way, and exuded an air of mastery and supreme confidence.  Two FP-45s provided more horsepower than a complete four-unit set of F-7s.
 
The FP-45s were numbered 100 through 108.


« Last Edit: Jul 3rd, 2004, 2:45pm by Norm_Anderson » Logged
Pennsy
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Re: Santa Fe Passenger Diesels
 
« Reply #8 on: May 2nd, 2004, 2:26pm »
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Hi Norm,
 
Looks like you have been pretty busy accumulating all that good data.
 
With respect to the FP-45's, you can see one at the Perris RR and Trolley museum in Perris, CA. It is in operating condition, and in fairly good shape. I climbed aboard her once and she is still a good looking engine. Her size amazes you, and those C-C trucks just catch your eye. The Warbonnet colors just bring a smile to your face.  
 
Keep up the good work.


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Norm_Anderson
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Re: Santa Fe Passenger Diesels
 
« Reply #9 on: May 2nd, 2004, 2:48pm »
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Thanks, Alan,
 
If I ever get out to Southern California again, the OERM will definitely be on my "must-visit" list.  It's been thirty years since I was there, and I'm thrilled they have an operable FP-45!  I've heard their collection has continued to grow-- maybe I'll have to get a motel room in Perris or Elsinore and spend several days there.  (Oh, to dream...)
 
Regards,
 
Norm


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ClydeDET
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Re: Santa Fe Passenger Diesels
 
« Reply #10 on: May 3rd, 2004, 9:41am »
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Dallas has an FP-45 at the Age of Steam Museum in Fair Park, Warbonnet colors and all (with one of the round-end chair/obs lightweights behind). Not operable AFAIK.
 
Iron Horses of the Santa Fe Trail by McMillan has  LOT of data (including renumbering schemes) on early Santa Fe diesels, and EARLY DIESEL DAYS ON THE SANTA FE has even more, including a LOT of material on the early runs of Amos & Andy. And tales of the F-Ms explaining why they were decidedly minority power in Santa Fe passenger service despite good results from F-M switchers.


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SSW9389
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Re: Santa Fe Passenger Diesels
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« Reply #11 on: Jul 25th, 2004, 7:30am »
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Three of Santa Fe's U30CG lead a Southbound freight through Fort Worth on May 10, 1973. The U30CGs and U28CGs were withdrawn from passenger service in the Spring of 1969 after a wreck near Chillicothe, Illinois led the Santa Fe to believe the GEs were the cause.

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SSW9389
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Re: Santa Fe Passenger Diesels
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« Reply #12 on: Jul 25th, 2004, 7:33am »
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U28CGs in freight service 1972.

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SSW9389
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Re: Santa Fe Passenger Diesels
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« Reply #13 on: Nov 15th, 2004, 7:49pm »
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Here's an FP45 working a westbound freight through West Bellemont, AZ.

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ATSF_railfan
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Re: Santa Fe Passenger Diesels
 
« Reply #14 on: Nov 28th, 2004, 10:56am »
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Quite the data.
 
One question: Didn't the Super Chief also use F7 A's & B's? Or were the E1's more common on the train?
 


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Re: Santa Fe Passenger Diesels
 
« Reply #15 on: Nov 28th, 2004, 11:51am »
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Hi Norm,
 
They certainly did. They even used FP-7's, with their steam heating equipment. Probably FP-7B's as well.


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Norm_Anderson
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Re: Santa Fe Passenger Diesels
 
« Reply #16 on: Nov 30th, 2004, 10:31am »
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on Nov 28th, 2004, 10:56am, ATSF_railfan wrote:       (Click here for original message)
Quite the data.
 
One question: Didn't the Super Chief also use F7 A's & B's? Or were the E1's more common on the train?
 

 
Hi, ATSF_railfan and fellow Chicophile!
 
For a "thumbnail summary" of the Super through the years, check out the "Super Chief Consists" thread here on the Santa Fe board...  but, to briefly summarize:
 
The Super Chief and El Capitan were pulled by the rakish, slant-nosed E's until about the end of WW2, when the E's were replaced by the "Passenger FT's".  The F-3s replaced the FTs, and the F7s replaced the F3s.  The displaced units were bumped down to second-tier services.  The only passenger engines that apparently did not often appear on the Super were the Alcos (though they may have made the occasional rare appearance).
 
Regards,
 
Norm


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ATSF_railfan
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Re: Santa Fe Passenger Diesels
 
« Reply #17 on: Dec 5th, 2004, 10:15am »
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on Nov 30th, 2004, 10:31am, Norm_Anderson wrote:       (Click here for original message)

 
Hi, ATSF_railfan and fellow Chicophile!
 
For a "thumbnail summary" of the Super through the years, check out the "Super Chief Consists" thread here on the Santa Fe board...  but, to briefly summarize:
 
The Super Chief and El Capitan were pulled by the rakish, slant-nosed E's until about the end of WW2, when the E's were replaced by the "Passenger FT's".  The F-3s replaced the FTs, and the F7s replaced the F3s.  The displaced units were bumped down to second-tier services.  The only passenger engines that apparently did not often appear on the Super were the Alcos (though they may have made the occasional rare appearance).
 
Regards,
 
Norm

 
Thanks Norm! I'll be sure to check that thread out...


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SSW9389
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Re: Santa Fe Passenger Diesels
 
« Reply #18 on: Jan 11th, 2005, 10:41pm »
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Another note here on Santa Fe second generation passenger power. The last 20 F45s #1920-1939 were delivered with steam lines and often ran in tandem with FP45s on the Super Chief and San Francisco Chief. This would put them in passenger service for the three years until Amtrak started.  
 
on May 2nd, 2004, 2:03pm, Norm_Anderson wrote:       (Click here for original message)
SECOND-GENERATION POWER:
 
 
GE,  Model "U-28CG":
 
 
During the mid-1960s, as other railroads were frantically trying to divest themselves of their passenger operations, Santa Fe was still purchasing brand-new motive power for its passenger trains.  First to arrive, in 1966, were ten General Electric "U-boats", specially modified for passenger service.  Their assigned Road Numbers, 350 through 359, even continued the numbering series used by the F-7 fleet.  But despite their passenger gearing, steam generators, and the splashy red-and-silver "Warbonnet" paint scheme, these locomotives still managed to shout "Freight Train Coming!" everywhere they went.  These units could usually be found, in pairs operated "pachyderm-style", at the head of the Texas Chief.
 
 
GE,  Model "U-30CG":
 
 
The following year, 1967, saw the arrival of six new, 3,000-hp U-30CGs.  General Electric tried to give these units a more "passenger-looking" appearance, with full-width carbodies, a somewhat rounded nose, and ribbed side panels.  The results received mixed reviews.  These units were usually assigned to Southern California runs, where they could be seen, operating solo, powering such trains as the San Diegan or the last-years, three- or four-car incarnation of the Grand Canyon.  (Some Southern California railfans referred to the U-30CGs as "Uglies").  The six units were numbered 400 through 405.
 
 
 
EMD,  Model "FP-45":
 
 
Also delivered in 1967 were nine massive, Warbonneted 3,600-horsepower FP-45s, the most powerful passenger locomotives Santa Fe ever purchased, specifically to power the flagship Super Chief/El Capitan.  Assigned in pairs and operated "pachyderm-style", they carried Trains 17 and 18 between Chicago and Barstow, Calif. (aging F-units still did the honors over Cajon Pass into Los Angeles).  In contrast to the freight-unit appearance of the U-28CGs and U-30CGs, these FP-45 "cowl units" were clean-lined, almost sleek in their own angular way, and exuded an air of mastery and supreme confidence.  Two FP-45s provided more horsepower than a complete four-unit set of F-7s.
 
The FP-45s were numbered 100 through 108.



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sergio_vadora
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Re: Santa Fe Passenger Diesels
 
« Reply #19 on: Jan 27th, 2005, 3:01am »
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When you see Sante Fe F7 A-B-B-A set on passenger trains and no steam generator coach following means that the engines has own generator itself?
 
Thanks.
CIAO
Sergio, Italy


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